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forsere

English translation: negotiate

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Norwegian term or phrase:forsere
English translation:negotiate
Entered by: brigidm
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05:12 Jun 28, 2007
Norwegian to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Norwegian term or phrase: forsere
Marketing text for dairy products. Sentence reads: "Ofte skal flere fjorder forseres, og lokalsamfunnet strekker seg gjerne litt ekstra for å få melka fram til meieriet."
I'm not sure how to interpret "forsere" here as it doesn't fit my dictionary definitions.
brigidm
Norway
Local time: 10:10
negotiate
Explanation:
Frederika is correct about the meaning: force, overcome, surmount. The word is also used in the same sense in (archaic) English: 'How the Count of Foix forced the pass called la Garde'. I would say something like 'several fjords must be negotiated...'
Selected response from:

Diarmuid Kennan
Ireland
Local time: 09:10
Grading comment
Nice one, Diarmuid. Thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1negotiate
Diarmuid Kennan
3cross
Thomas Deschington
3force (their way through)Frederika Heden


  

Answers


34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
force (their way through)


Explanation:
I'd say you could use "force" in English as well, in a construction like "force their way through" or something such. That's what it (basically) means in Norwegian as well. Once upon a time they probably -had- to "force" their way through the fjords. Today it might not need as much effort and you could probably use "pass through" or "cross" if you want to 'soften' it up.

Frederika Heden
Sweden
Local time: 10:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
negotiate


Explanation:
Frederika is correct about the meaning: force, overcome, surmount. The word is also used in the same sense in (archaic) English: 'How the Count of Foix forced the pass called la Garde'. I would say something like 'several fjords must be negotiated...'

Diarmuid Kennan
Ireland
Local time: 09:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Nice one, Diarmuid. Thanks.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Frederika Heden: negotiate is a good one, I didn't spontaneously think of that =)
2 hrs
  -> Thanks
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
cross


Explanation:
I think in this context it simply means "to cross" or "traverse". Unless the waters are very rough, you don't have to "force" your way across a fjord.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2007-06-28 09:41:32 GMT)
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If you do a search in Google on "forsere" and "fjell" for example, you see that the word is used in the sense of "getting over", "climb", "cross", etc. It seems as though common usage has adopted a slightly different meaning than in the dictionary.

Thomas Deschington
Poland
Local time: 10:10
Native speaker of: Native in NorwegianNorwegian
PRO pts in category: 9
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