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rødberget

English translation: the hematite ore / red rock /reddle

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Norwegian term or phrase:rødberget
English translation:the hematite ore / red rock /reddle
Entered by: Christine Andersen
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16:09 Sep 3, 2008
Norwegian to English translations [PRO]
Science - Geology / type of rock with mineral deposits
Norwegian term or phrase: rødberget
Området er verdenskjent. Jern og sjeldne mineraler ble skjøvet opp fra ca.100 km stort dyp i tilførselsrøret til vulkanen. Innholdet i **rødberget** er ca. 50 % jern .... Den siste istiden dekket området med marine sedimenter som stopper mye av strålingen fra de radioaktive bergartene.

At first I thought rødberget might be a place name, as it came up in short headings and captions, but I can see it is not.

Grateful for any help - I've drawn a blank!
Christine Andersen
Denmark
Local time: 06:23
the hematite ore
Explanation:
:o)
Selected response from:

Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 06:23
Grading comment
Thanks, Sven, this was the one when I checked it out. But an explanation or reference would have saved my beauty sleep ;-)
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5the hematite ore
Sven Petersson
4the red (mountain) rockMichele Fauble
3 +1Rodberget (Red Mountain)
Hanne Rask Sonderborg
3reddle, ruddle
jeffrey engberg


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
the hematite ore


Explanation:
:o)

Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 06:23
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2
Grading comment
Thanks, Sven, this was the one when I checked it out. But an explanation or reference would have saved my beauty sleep ;-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Michele Fauble: Technically correct, but the Norwegian doesn't use a technical term, instead referring to it as 'red rock' - a stylistic difference.
2 days5 hrs
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Rodberget (Red Mountain)


Explanation:
See
"GLOSSARY OF GEOGRAPHIACAL NAMES
MANY names of geographical features mentioned in this book are of
Scandinavian or, in some cases, German origin. The following list
gives English equivalents for the more common geographical terms
in this category which occur in the text or maps: (...) Rodberget Red Mountain"
http://www.archive.org/stream/whiledesert000393mbp/whiledese...

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Note added at 36 mins (2008-09-03 16:46:20 GMT)
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If they don't mean the mountain, but the rock, I found "Hematitic ferro-carbonate (rodberg)" in
http://books.google.com/books?id=9aVUTgKDNYEC&pg=PA320&dq="H...

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Note added at 39 mins (2008-09-03 16:49:38 GMT)
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I still think that in the particular sentence you have, they do mean a specific mountain, because rødberget is in the definite form (-et).

Hanne Rask Sonderborg
Local time: 00:23
Native speaker of: Native in DanishDanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mari Noller: This one sounds logical to me :)
1 hr
  -> Thank you Mari!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
reddle, ruddle


Explanation:
rud·dle Audio Help (rŭd'l) Pronunciation Key
n. Red ocherous iron ore, used in dyeing and marking.

tr.v. rud·dled also red·dled or rad·dled, rud·dling also red·dling or rad·dl·ing, rud·dles also red·dles or rad·dles
To dye or mark with or as if with red ocher: ruddle sheep.


[Probably diminutive of rud, red, from Middle English rudde, from Old English rudu; see reudh- in Indo-European roots.]

jeffrey engberg
Norway
Local time: 06:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
the red (mountain) rock


Explanation:
This is just a way of referring to the "bergart" that is reddish in color due to the high iron context.


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Note added at 6 hrs (2008-09-03 22:21:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

That should be "... red iron conTENT".


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Note added at 6 hrs (2008-09-03 22:23:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"... HIGH iron conTENT"


Michele Fauble
United States
Local time: 21:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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