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GRUNNTID

English translation: Basic hours

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Norwegian term or phrase:Grunntid
English translation:Basic hours
Entered by: Andy Bell
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09:39 Mar 22, 2002
Norwegian to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
Norwegian term or phrase: GRUNNTID
"Avtalte prosentsatser for utarifferte riggarbeider. Beregens av sum grunntid".
A contract for siteworkers. My initial thoughts along the lines of "Agreed percentages for untariffed rig/siteworkers. To be calculated from the total basic-time". Any help appreciated.

TIA

Andy
Andy Bell
Local time: 04:55
basic hours
Explanation:
In the UK Minimum wage regulation this is the term used (presume you're asking for British terms !? See below how It's used:
"Regulation 22: sets out how to calculate the hours of salaried hours work where the worker has worked for
longer than the basic hours under the contract. This maintains the principle that the worker should be paid the
national minimum wage on average for every hour worked. When excess hours are worked, Regulation 22
applies instead of Regulation 21. Regulation 22 accordingly contains a different definition of "basic hours",
based on whether the hours in the worker’s contract are varied upwards or downwards during the year; and on
how many variations have been made. The purpose of this calculation is to establish the correct start-point in
each case from which the excess hours must be counted.
Regulation 22: also defines what is meant by the "calculation year" for the contract, which will run differently
for workers already employed on 1 April 1999 (when the Regulations are due to come into force) and workers
who start with a new employer after that time."

My second reference is Norwegian document which demonstrates how the term is used in contracts with a University, from which you can deduct that "grunntid" is basically equivalent to "basic hours"



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-22 10:07:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

oops! My a\'s seem to be falling out of the text. Sorry!
Selected response from:

Hege Jakobsen Lepri
Local time: 16:55
Grading comment
Thanks very much Hege. I had aslo seen reference to "grunntid" in the context of - "we will available at the given time of 10-00 until 16-00" etc, and so that confused me a little. But I think your answer seems ok to me. Thanks for the effort involved.

Cheers

Andy
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1basic hours
Hege Jakobsen Lepri
4base hours
Elaine Scholpp
4base time
Tore Bjerkek


  

Answers


26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
basic hours


Explanation:
In the UK Minimum wage regulation this is the term used (presume you're asking for British terms !? See below how It's used:
"Regulation 22: sets out how to calculate the hours of salaried hours work where the worker has worked for
longer than the basic hours under the contract. This maintains the principle that the worker should be paid the
national minimum wage on average for every hour worked. When excess hours are worked, Regulation 22
applies instead of Regulation 21. Regulation 22 accordingly contains a different definition of "basic hours",
based on whether the hours in the worker’s contract are varied upwards or downwards during the year; and on
how many variations have been made. The purpose of this calculation is to establish the correct start-point in
each case from which the excess hours must be counted.
Regulation 22: also defines what is meant by the "calculation year" for the contract, which will run differently
for workers already employed on 1 April 1999 (when the Regulations are due to come into force) and workers
who start with a new employer after that time."

My second reference is Norwegian document which demonstrates how the term is used in contracts with a University, from which you can deduct that "grunntid" is basically equivalent to "basic hours"



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-22 10:07:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

oops! My a\'s seem to be falling out of the text. Sorry!


    Reference: http://www.dti.gov.uk/er/nmw/nmwover.pdf
    Reference: http://www.hihm.no/pershandbok/ekskon.doc
Hege Jakobsen Lepri
Local time: 16:55
Native speaker of: Native in NorwegianNorwegian
PRO pts in pair: 97
Grading comment
Thanks very much Hege. I had aslo seen reference to "grunntid" in the context of - "we will available at the given time of 10-00 until 16-00" etc, and so that confused me a little. But I think your answer seems ok to me. Thanks for the effort involved.

Cheers

Andy

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tore Bjerkek
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
base time


Explanation:
Similar, but I feel "base" is more commonly used in this case.
Example:

"Our base time charged account provides four hours a month included ....."

Good luck.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-22 12:35:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It struck me after I sent the suggestion that time is not an unit but a concept. Hour is. So Basic hours, as Hege suggested sounds reasonabel in conjuction with calculation of wages.


    Reference: http://members.iinet.net/products/dialup.html
Tore Bjerkek
Canada
Local time: 16:55
Native speaker of: Native in NorwegianNorwegian
PRO pts in pair: 807
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
base hours


Explanation:
Having read the previous suggestions, I think this is the best translation. Basic is better than base because it is closer to "grunn". At least in American English, basic implies simple or easy, whereas base is a more accurate way of designating the bottom or starting point. I agree that it should be hours rather than time.

Elaine Scholpp
Local time: 14:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4
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