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nasza era

English translation: the AD era

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Polish term or phrase:nasza era
English translation:the AD era
Entered by: Józef Kwasniak
Options:
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07:22 Mar 5, 2002
Polish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Polish term or phrase: nasza era
na początku naszej ery
Józef Kwasniak
Local time: 05:43
the AD era / common era
Explanation:
The AD Era to 1900
http://www.angelfire.com/rnb/bashiri/CHRON/Thousand.html


The references of B.C. (before Christ) and A.D. (the year of our Lord) are based upon the Christian dating system. This creates a problem for Jewish people who prefer not to use references to Christ, so they opt for different designations for the same time periods: B.C.E. (i.e., B.C.) and C.E., “common era” (i.e., A.D.).
http://www.ariel.org/qajewcal.html

Recent Jewish research has shed much light on the complex and varied religious and social situation in Palestine during the first century of the Common Era (i.e. the era common to Jews and Christians).
http://www.jcrelations.net/stmnts/lambeth88.htm


The Common Era is common simply because many people, including non-
christians, have agreed to use this dating convention out of convenience.
Since any dating convention must start with some arbitrary point in time,
why not continue to use the one we've been using already for 1400 years
or more. If you choose to identify this era as that of your "Lord", so
be it. Others might choose to identify as the "Common Era", i.e., the
period delineated by this dating convention we all share. It is nothing
more, and that is what makes it less value-laden, despite the arbitrary
point of departure.
http://www.ku.edu/~medieval/melcher/matthias/t22/0119.html

The system, or calendar, we use to work out the number of the year we're in is based on the Common Era (CE). This covers the period from the birth of Christ to the present day. The millennium therefore marks 2000 years since Christ was born.
http://www.learningalive.co.uk/lapages/topical/millennium.ht...
Selected response from:

Jacek Krankowski
Grading comment
Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5A.D.=anno Domini ; B.C. = before Christ = p.n.e.
maciejm
4the AD era / common eraJacek Krankowski
4In the beginning of our era (century- more common usage)
Vladimir Dubisskiy


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
In the beginning of our era (century- more common usage)


Explanation:
Era=one of the five major divisions of geologic time (Paleozoic era)

Vladimir Dubisskiy
United States
Local time: 22:43
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in pair: 59
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
A.D.=anno Domini ; B.C. = before Christ = p.n.e.


Explanation:
comes from Latin. he died in70 A.D.



    Collins English Dictionary.
maciejm
Poland
Local time: 05:43
Native speaker of: Polish
PRO pts in pair: 1491
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
the AD era / common era


Explanation:
The AD Era to 1900
http://www.angelfire.com/rnb/bashiri/CHRON/Thousand.html


The references of B.C. (before Christ) and A.D. (the year of our Lord) are based upon the Christian dating system. This creates a problem for Jewish people who prefer not to use references to Christ, so they opt for different designations for the same time periods: B.C.E. (i.e., B.C.) and C.E., “common era” (i.e., A.D.).
http://www.ariel.org/qajewcal.html

Recent Jewish research has shed much light on the complex and varied religious and social situation in Palestine during the first century of the Common Era (i.e. the era common to Jews and Christians).
http://www.jcrelations.net/stmnts/lambeth88.htm


The Common Era is common simply because many people, including non-
christians, have agreed to use this dating convention out of convenience.
Since any dating convention must start with some arbitrary point in time,
why not continue to use the one we've been using already for 1400 years
or more. If you choose to identify this era as that of your "Lord", so
be it. Others might choose to identify as the "Common Era", i.e., the
period delineated by this dating convention we all share. It is nothing
more, and that is what makes it less value-laden, despite the arbitrary
point of departure.
http://www.ku.edu/~medieval/melcher/matthias/t22/0119.html

The system, or calendar, we use to work out the number of the year we're in is based on the Common Era (CE). This covers the period from the birth of Christ to the present day. The millennium therefore marks 2000 years since Christ was born.
http://www.learningalive.co.uk/lapages/topical/millennium.ht...

Jacek Krankowski
PRO pts in pair: 1633
Grading comment
Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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