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ciężkie naruszenie obowiązków pracowniczych

English translation: gross dereliction of duty / gross misconduct in office

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Polish term or phrase:ciężkie naruszenie obowiązków pracowniczych
English translation:gross dereliction of duty / gross misconduct in office
Entered by: Marek Daroszewski (MrMarDar)
Options:
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11:03 Oct 31, 2007
Polish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
Polish term or phrase: ciężkie naruszenie obowiązków pracowniczych
myślałem, że znajdę w glosariuszu a nie znalazłem a myślę, że coś takiego powinno być
Marek Daroszewski (MrMarDar)
Local time: 13:09
gross dereliction of duty
Explanation:
A person twice reported for gross dereliction of duty shall be punished by reduction of rank and if, after being reduced to a lower position for six months ...
Selected response from:

maciejm
Poland
Local time: 13:09
Grading comment
Dzięki
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4gross misconduct
Adam Lankamer
4 +1gross dereliction of duty
maciejm
4 +1gross breach of employee dutiesJolo
1poparcie dla wersji Adama
inmb


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
gross misconduct


Explanation:
http://tinyurl.com/3xrc7o

Adam Lankamer
Luxembourg
Local time: 13:09
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in category: 1511
Notes to answerer
Asker: jeszcze bym coś dodał...


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Maciek Drobka: Przykładem 'gross misconduct' są napaść na innego pracownika lub kradzież. To chyba za ostre wyrażenie. Ale nie jestem pewien.
6 mins
  -> bo za ciężki naruszenie się wylatuje, to musi być ostre ;-)

agree  Magda K: dokładnie tak to się tłumaczy.
15 mins

agree  IwonaASzymaniak
2 hrs

agree  inmb: zdecydowanie jestem za tą wersją; podałem uzasadnienie jako osobną odpowiedź (z braku miejsca)
1 day8 hrs

agree  bartek
2692 days
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
gross breach of employee duties


Explanation:
zwrot słownikowy

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Note added at 2 hrs (2007-10-31 13:53:30 GMT)
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naruszenie

° breach, infringement, violation
ciężkie naruszenie obowiązków pracowniczych gross breach of employee duties; naruszenie tajemnicy handlowej violation of a trade secret; istotne naruszenie obowiązku wynikającego z umowy material breach of a contractual obligation

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Note added at 2 hrs (2007-10-31 13:56:13 GMT)
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Article 07.09.05Under the new proposals, an organisation commits a gross breach of duty if its failure constitutes conduct falling far below what can be reasonably expected ...
www.beachcroft.co.uk/beachcroft/news-room/articles/article-... - 22k - Kopia


Jolo
PRO pts in category: 33
Notes to answerer
Asker: ale to się nie sklada - nie występuje ani razu :(

Asker: Jolo, ja wiem, że te terminy są poprawne i występują powszechnie, ale oddzielnie. Ale łącznie po prostu nie. Stąd szukam potwierdzenia na coś co znalazłem i myślę, że dobrze oddaje owe 'naruszenie obowiązków pracowniczych'. Ale nie chcę nic sugerować.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  IwonaASzymaniak
1 min
  -> Dziękuję
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
gross dereliction of duty


Explanation:
A person twice reported for gross dereliction of duty shall be punished by reduction of rank and if, after being reduced to a lower position for six months ...



    Reference: http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/legal_library/cn/legal_library...
maciejm
Poland
Local time: 13:09
Native speaker of: Polish
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
Dzięki
Notes to answerer
Asker: O! to jeszcze inaczej - i nie powiem, że mi sie nie podoba :-)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  bartek
3 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
poparcie dla wersji Adama


Explanation:
Inaczej mi się nie zmieści:

Sprawdziłem brytyjską wersję LexisNexis i niewiele znalazłem w najnowszej wersji Employment Act na ten temat. Ale w wyniku przeszukiwania pełnotekstowego wyszło mi coś takiego, jak ponizej.

Wydaje mi się, że sytuacja wymieniona pod (11) jest dokładnym odpowiednikiem takiego przypadku, którego szukasz.

HTH


568. Essential features of disciplinary procedures; reasonable behaviour.
Disciplinary procedures should not be viewed primarily as a means of imposing sanctions. Rather they should be seen as a way of encouraging improvement amongst employees whose conduct or standard of work is unsatisfactory1. Some organisations may prefer to have separate procedures for dealing with issues of conduct and capability2. When drawing up and applying disciplinary procedures, employers should always bear in mind the requirements of natural justice3 and the fact that their actions, if judged by a court or tribunal, will be judged against a standard of 'reasonableness'. Accordingly, disciplinary procedures should:


(1) be put in writing;

(2) specify to whom they apply;

(3) be non-discriminatory;

(4) provide for matters to be dealt with without undue delay;

(5) provide for information to be kept confidential;

(6) tell employees what disciplinary action might be taken4;

(7) specify the levels of management which have the authority to take disciplinary action5;

(8) require employees to be informed of the complaints against them and of the supporting evidence before any meeting;

(9) give employees a chance to have their say before management reaches a decision6;

(10) provide employees with the right to be accompanied7;

(11) provide that, except in cases of gross misconduct8, no employee is to be dismissed for a first breach of discipline9;

(12) require management to investigate fully before any disciplinary action is taken10;

(13) ensure that employees are given an explanation for any sanction;

(14) allow employees to appeal against a decision11.
When operating disciplinary procedures, employers should be particularly careful not to discriminate on the grounds of gender, race, disability, age, sexual orientation or religion12.

Special consideration should be given to the way in which disciplinary procedures are to operate in exceptional cases, which include:


(a) where the full procedure is not immediately available13;

(b) trade union representatives14;

(c) criminal charges or convictions not related to employment15.
1 ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures para 58. As to the ACAS Code of Practice see para 561 note 3 ante; and as to ACAS Codes of Practice generally see trade, industry and industrial relations vol 47 (2001 Reissue) paras 1444–1445.

2 Ibid para 58. Larger organisations may also have separate procedures to deal with other issues such as harassment or bullying: para 58. Where a policy is in place dealing in a bespoke way with a particular issue at work, especially so when it has been agreed by trade unions, it should be used: Blackburn with Darwen Borough Council v Stanley [2005] All ER (D) 135 (May), EAT (agreed dignity at work policy encompassed accusations of bullying).

3 ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures para 59. This means that employees should be given the opportunity of a meeting with someone who has not been involved in the matter. They should be informed of the allegations against them, together with the supporting evidence, in advance of the meeting. Employees should be given the opportunity to challenge the allegations before decisions are reached and should be provided with a right of appeal: para 59. As to rights of appeal see para 575 post. As to the statutory minimum procedures see para 563 et seq ante.

4 Certain disciplinary actions may need clear contractual authority: see para 562 ante.

5 Heads (8) and (9) in the text lay the basis for the normal requirement of a hearing before a dismissal: see para 575 post.

6 An opportunity to state a case may be viewed as an elementary requirement of natural justice: see para 575 post.

7 Where a trade union representative accompanies the employee, this does not mean per se that the employer recognises the union: Union of Shop, Distributive and Allied Workers v Sketchley Ltd [1981] ICR 644, [1981] IRLR 291, EAT; and see trade, industry and industrial relations vol 47 (2001 Reissue) para 1302. As to the statutory right to be accompanied at a disciplinary hearing see para 586 et seq post.

8 Summary dismissal remains an option for the employer in a case of gross misconduct, and has not been affected legally by the existence of the law on unfair dismissal: see para 617 post. As to gross misconduct see para 567 note 12 ante. If an employer considers an employee guilty of gross misconduct, and thus potentially liable for summary dismissal, it is still important to establish the facts before taking any action. A short period of suspension with full pay may be helpful or necessary, although it should only be imposed after careful consideration and should be kept under review. It should be made clear to the employee that the suspension is not a disciplinary action and does not involve any prejudgement: ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures para 35. The core principle of reasonable behaviour, that employers should give employees the opportunity of putting their case at a disciplinary meeting before deciding whether to take action, applies as much to cases of gross misconduct as it does to ordinary cases of misconduct or unsatisfactory performance: para 36. As to the modified statutory procedure which allows for those very limited cases where despite the fact that an employer has dismissed an employee immediately without a meeting an employment tribunal will, exceptionally, find the dismissal to be fair see para 565 note 12 ante. See also para 564 ante.

9 Head (11) in the text lays the basis for a system of formal warnings in cases other than those of gross misconduct: see para 572 post.

10 This is particularly important in cases of suspected misconduct, especially theft: British Home Stores Ltd v Burchell [1980] ICR 303n, [1978] IRLR 379, EAT; and see ILEA v Gravett [1988] IRLR 497, EAT. As to investigation see para 570 post.

11 ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures para 60. As to appeals see para 575 post.

12 Ibid para 4. For these purposes, race includes colour, nationality, and ethnic or national origins: para 4. When dealing with disciplinary issues in the workplace employers should bear in mind that they are required under the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 to make reasonable adjustments to cater for employees who have a disability (see discrimination vol 13 (2007 Reissue) para 507 et seq), for example providing for wheelchair access if necessary: ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures para 10.

13 Special arrangements may be necessary for handling disciplinary matters among nightshift workers, employees in isolated locations or depots or others who may be difficult to reach, albeit within the parameters of the appropriate statutory procedures where they apply: ibid para 41. As to the meaning of references to appropriate statutory procedures see para 565 note 42 ante.

14 Disciplinary action against a trade union representative can lead to a serious dispute if it is seen as an attack on the union's functions. Although normal disciplinary standards should apply, if disciplinary action is contemplated the case should be discussed, after obtaining the employee's agreement, with a senior trade union representative or permanent union official: ibid para 42. See further para 652 post.

15 If an employee is charged with, or convicted of, a criminal offence not related to work, this is not in itself reason for disciplinary action: ibid para 43. The employer should establish the facts of the case and consider whether the matter is serious enough to warrant starting the disciplinary procedure: para 43. The main consideration should be whether the offence, or alleged offence, is one that makes the employee unsuitable for his type of work: para 43. Similarly, an employee should not be dismissed solely because he is absent from work as a result of being remanded in custody: para 43. See further para 653 post.



Search Terms: [('gross misconduct')](1872)

Source: [Halsbury's Laws of England]

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Date/Time: Thursday, November, 1, 2007, 19:20 GMT Back to Top


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inmb
Local time: 13:09
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Polish
PRO pts in category: 462
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Changes made by editors
Nov 5, 2007 - Changes made by Marek Daroszewski (MrMarDar):
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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