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Przekłady Akwilli, Teodocjana, Symmacha

English translation: the Versions of Aquila, Theodotion and Symmachus

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Polish term or phrase:Przekłady Akwilli, Teodocjana, Symmacha
English translation:the Versions of Aquila, Theodotion and Symmachus
Entered by: Caryl Swift
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17:54 Mar 17, 2007
Polish to English translations [PRO]
Religion / bible
Polish term or phrase: Przekłady Akwilli, Teodocjana, Symmacha
..
plotka
Local time: 06:02
the Versions of Aquila, Theodotion and Symmachus
Explanation:
"(2) Version of Aquila

In the second century, to meet the demands of both Jews and Christians, three other Greek versions of the Old Testament were produced, though they never took the place of the Septuagint. Only fragmentary remains of them are preserved, chiefly from Origen's "Hexapla" (q.v.). The first and the most original is that of Aquila, a native of Sinope in Pontus, a proselyte to Judaism, and according to St. Jerome, a pupil of Rabbi Akiba who taught in the Palestinian schools, 95-135. Aquila, taking the Hebrew as he found it, proves in his rendering to be "a slave to the letter". When his version appeared, about 130, its rabbinical character won approval from the Jews but distrust from the Christians. It was the favoured among the Greek-speaking Jews of the fourth and fifth centuries, and in the sixth was sanctioned by Justinian for public reading in the synagogues. Then it rapidly fell into disuse and disappeared. Origen and St. Jerome found it of value in the study of the original text and of the methods of Jewish interpretation in the early Christian years.

(3) Version of Theodotion

Another Greek version practically contemporaneous with Aquila's was made by Theodotion, probably an Ephesian Jew or Ebionite. It held a middle place among the ancient Greek translations, preserving the character of a free revision of the Septuagint, the omissions and erroneous renderings of which it corrected. It also showed parts not appearing in the original, as the deuterocanonical fragments of Daniel, the postscript of Job, the Book of Baruch, but not the Book of Esther. It was not approved by the Jews but was favourably received by the Christians. Origin gave it a place in his "Hexapla" and from it supplied parts missing in the Septuagint. St. Irenæus used its text of Daniel, which was afterwards adopted in the Church.

(4) Version of Symmachus

This appeared at the close of the second century. Its author was an Ebionite of Jewish or Samaritan origin. Giving the sense rather than the letter of the Hebrew, he turned its idioms into good Greek, used paraphrases, and translated independently of the earlier versions. His work, though finished and intelligible to readers ignorant of Hebrew, sometimes failed to give the real meaning of the original. It was but little used by the Jews. St. Jerome admired its literary qualities and was often guided by it in preparing the Vulgate. "
( From: http://tinyurl.com/2x4n6l )


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Note added at 31 mins (2007-03-17 18:26:01 GMT)
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:-)
Selected response from:

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 06:02
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3the Versions of Aquila, Theodotion and Symmachus
Caryl Swift


  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the Versions of Aquila, Theodotion and Symmachus


Explanation:
"(2) Version of Aquila

In the second century, to meet the demands of both Jews and Christians, three other Greek versions of the Old Testament were produced, though they never took the place of the Septuagint. Only fragmentary remains of them are preserved, chiefly from Origen's "Hexapla" (q.v.). The first and the most original is that of Aquila, a native of Sinope in Pontus, a proselyte to Judaism, and according to St. Jerome, a pupil of Rabbi Akiba who taught in the Palestinian schools, 95-135. Aquila, taking the Hebrew as he found it, proves in his rendering to be "a slave to the letter". When his version appeared, about 130, its rabbinical character won approval from the Jews but distrust from the Christians. It was the favoured among the Greek-speaking Jews of the fourth and fifth centuries, and in the sixth was sanctioned by Justinian for public reading in the synagogues. Then it rapidly fell into disuse and disappeared. Origen and St. Jerome found it of value in the study of the original text and of the methods of Jewish interpretation in the early Christian years.

(3) Version of Theodotion

Another Greek version practically contemporaneous with Aquila's was made by Theodotion, probably an Ephesian Jew or Ebionite. It held a middle place among the ancient Greek translations, preserving the character of a free revision of the Septuagint, the omissions and erroneous renderings of which it corrected. It also showed parts not appearing in the original, as the deuterocanonical fragments of Daniel, the postscript of Job, the Book of Baruch, but not the Book of Esther. It was not approved by the Jews but was favourably received by the Christians. Origin gave it a place in his "Hexapla" and from it supplied parts missing in the Septuagint. St. Irenæus used its text of Daniel, which was afterwards adopted in the Church.

(4) Version of Symmachus

This appeared at the close of the second century. Its author was an Ebionite of Jewish or Samaritan origin. Giving the sense rather than the letter of the Hebrew, he turned its idioms into good Greek, used paraphrases, and translated independently of the earlier versions. His work, though finished and intelligible to readers ignorant of Hebrew, sometimes failed to give the real meaning of the original. It was but little used by the Jews. St. Jerome admired its literary qualities and was often guided by it in preparing the Vulgate. "
( From: http://tinyurl.com/2x4n6l )


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 31 mins (2007-03-17 18:26:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

:-)

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 06:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 48
Notes to answerer
Asker: Wow, dziękuję

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