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passado

English translation: insipid

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Portuguese term or phrase:passado
English translation:insipid
Entered by: Henrique Serra
Options:
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14:48 Jun 29, 2007
Portuguese to English translations [PRO]
Science - Agriculture / Citrus cropping
Portuguese term or phrase: passado
I need an adjective in English to express that something is "passado", in the sense that it has reached a point beyond maturity and has lost its pleasant taste.

My text says that when oranges remain on the tree beyond the point when they should be harvested, their juice becomes "passado", meaning it tastes unpleasant because of low acidity.

Can I use "stale" in this situation? Or would "vapid" be a better option? I think the latter term is not frequently used and is probably unsuitable, but who am I to say?

Thanks for any suggestions or comments.

Preciso de um adjetivo em inglês para expressar que algo está "passado", no sentido de que está além da maturidade e perdeu o sabor agradável.

Meu texto diz que quando laranjas permanecem no pé além do ponto em que devem ser colhidas, o suco resultante fica "passado", isto é, o sabor é desagradável porque houve perda de acidez.

Pode-se usar "stale" nesse caso? Ou seria melhor "vapid"? Acho que este último é um termo pouco usado e inadequado, mas quem sou eu para achar?

Agradeço qualquer sugestão ou comentário.
Henrique Serra
Local time: 14:59
insipid
Explanation:
Rex: First, you have to remember that sugar is a part of Brix, but Brix is not sugar. If you go back and study a few later BrixTalk posts, you may spot the place where I commented on the "insipid" label used in Florida to address overly ripe oranges that had stayed on the tree too long. Taste is far more than just sugar. There are acids, flavonoids, aminos, antioxidants, oils and who knows what else involved. If the tree is in poor soil and does not have adequate resources to create what I call "goodies," that does not mean the leaves will cease making sugar and if the fruit remains on the tree past proper harvest time that sugar will accumulate.

http://www.westonaprice.org/farming/nutrient-dense.html

Other options: tasteless, lose their taste, etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2007-06-29 18:01:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Citrus is harvested by hand. At this point, there have not been any widely accepted methods of mechanical harvest. The time of harvest is dictated by the market or in some cases by legal maturity standards. Citrus is more forgiving than some other crops in that harvesting can be delayed somewhat and fruit quality is not decreased too much by the extra time on the tree. This varies with variety. However, if fruit are left on the tree too long, quality deteriorates as acid levels decrease and the taste becomes insipid.

http://www.answers.com/topic/cit-rus
Selected response from:

Amy Duncan
Brazil
Local time: 14:59
Grading comment
Thanks to all respondents, particularly to Amy. I decided to use a combination of "insipid" and "off" (off-flavored) in my context.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1overripe
Ben Kohn
4insipidAmy Duncan
3loses its fresh taste
Muriel Vasconcellos
3 -1stale
Denise Miranda


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
stale


Explanation:
Stale sounds good to me. Vapid é mais apropriado para "sem gosto", sem graça.

Denise Miranda
Local time: 14:59
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ben Kohn: Hmm, to me stale implies having lost its freshness or taste, usually due to contact with air (stale bread). A stale juice would be one that had gone off after having been produced and left out the fridge or something like that.
37 mins

disagree  xxxLumen: Stale is more used for bread/cake/pastries, not for juice.
14 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
overripe


Explanation:
for fruit, we say overripe. ;)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 29 mins (2007-06-29 15:17:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Henrique, sorry, I can't think of a specific adjective we would use for juice. There may be one but I can't remember using or seeing it.
I think I would say: When the oranges are left on the tree until they reach the point of being harvested, the resulting juice is adversely affected due to the ripeness/overripeness of the fruit.

Ben Kohn
United Kingdom
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Clauwolf
1 hr
  -> Thsnks, Clauwolf!
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
insipid


Explanation:
Rex: First, you have to remember that sugar is a part of Brix, but Brix is not sugar. If you go back and study a few later BrixTalk posts, you may spot the place where I commented on the "insipid" label used in Florida to address overly ripe oranges that had stayed on the tree too long. Taste is far more than just sugar. There are acids, flavonoids, aminos, antioxidants, oils and who knows what else involved. If the tree is in poor soil and does not have adequate resources to create what I call "goodies," that does not mean the leaves will cease making sugar and if the fruit remains on the tree past proper harvest time that sugar will accumulate.

http://www.westonaprice.org/farming/nutrient-dense.html

Other options: tasteless, lose their taste, etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2007-06-29 18:01:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Citrus is harvested by hand. At this point, there have not been any widely accepted methods of mechanical harvest. The time of harvest is dictated by the market or in some cases by legal maturity standards. Citrus is more forgiving than some other crops in that harvesting can be delayed somewhat and fruit quality is not decreased too much by the extra time on the tree. This varies with variety. However, if fruit are left on the tree too long, quality deteriorates as acid levels decrease and the taste becomes insipid.

http://www.answers.com/topic/cit-rus

Amy Duncan
Brazil
Local time: 14:59
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks to all respondents, particularly to Amy. I decided to use a combination of "insipid" and "off" (off-flavored) in my context.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
loses its fresh taste


Explanation:
Since you didn't give us context, we don't know how the word occurs in your project, but you migiht be able to rephrase the sentence.

Another possibility might be "becomes bitter," from the following example, but it's not quite the same because it's about time lapse after it's squeezed.

Navel oranges can be juiced for immediate consumption, but **navel orange juice becomes bitter after a few hours**. With the exception of navel, ...
aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/Citrus/oranges.htm

Muriel Vasconcellos
United States
Local time: 10:59
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 72
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