KudoZ home » Portuguese to English » Art/Literary

"tia"

English translation: very snob lady

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Portuguese term or phrase:tia
English translation:very snob lady
Entered by: ana_brum
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

16:09 Jul 5, 2002
Portuguese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Portuguese term or phrase: "tia"
fala-se em Portugal muito das "tias", senhoras pretenciosas e ao mesmo tempo ridículas, que gostam de estar na moda e sentirem-se importantes
ana_brum
Local time: 04:54
for this context see explination below."busybody" or "snob"
Explanation:
This word is pretty tricky. As you probably know,it means "aunt", and it is used a lot with "older" teachers in schools, especially from children 10 and under. It can also mean "old-made". One possibility for this context would be "busybody" if the person is meddlesome.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 16:23:13 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

and snob in a polite sense. In this case you could almost translate the line and leave \"tia\" as is since the meaning is defined in the text.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 16:26:13 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

excuse me, old made should be old maid.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 16:48:37 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I just thought of \"a nice little old lady\" in the sense that tia is also another way of kindly (and tenderly) describing these women.
Selected response from:

Robin Santos
Brazil
Local time: 00:54
Grading comment
Esta é complicada, eu sei, mas desde já agradeço a todos a vossa colaboração. Uma “tia” é alguém que acima de tudo é extremamente “snob”, sem ser necessariamente velha ou mexeriqueira. Embora “snob” descreva na perfeição o tipo de pessoa que as “tias” são, é uma palavra que infelizmente não me resolve o problema. “Madam” seria uma opção, se o texto fosse só para UK, mas como também é para US, não poderei utilizar este termo. Entretanto vou deixar “tia” (e.g. "tia" Helena went to her yoga class) e fornecer uma nota explicativa como sugere Robin. Se alguém tiver mais alguma ideia, agradeço que me contacte.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +5for this context see explination below."busybody" or "snob"Robin Santos
5 +1madams
BrazBiz
5mutton dressed as lambNeeharika Lorimer
5showy ladies
Maria Luisa Duarte
5Style or Clothes QueenJane Lamb-Ruiz
4"ladies who lunch"kda
4snob is a noun
Daniel Marcus
4 -1Yentagrasa


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
madams


Explanation:
Ana, na Inglaterra as "tias" como você descreveu são as "madams", mesmo tipo de comportamento!

BrazBiz
Brazil
Local time: 00:54
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 147

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Toze
2 mins
  -> Também já morou na Inglaterra, Toze?

disagree  Marian Greenfield: not in the U.S.
5 mins
  -> As you can see above I wrote, in England...

agree  Aida Macedo
6 mins
  -> Obrigada, Aida

disagree  Robin Santos: for USA translation - "madam"is either used in extremely formal settings, but is not used as a slang term as is described in the asker's text
7 mins
  -> My answer states " In England"!!!!!

neutral  hmercer: se o texto também for lido por americanos, pode ser terrível: "madam" também é dona de prostíbulo
50 mins
  -> então depende mesmo do público alvo do texto da Ana Brum!!

agree  suesimons
1 hr
  -> Tks, Sue
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
for this context see explination below."busybody" or "snob"


Explanation:
This word is pretty tricky. As you probably know,it means "aunt", and it is used a lot with "older" teachers in schools, especially from children 10 and under. It can also mean "old-made". One possibility for this context would be "busybody" if the person is meddlesome.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 16:23:13 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

and snob in a polite sense. In this case you could almost translate the line and leave \"tia\" as is since the meaning is defined in the text.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 16:26:13 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

excuse me, old made should be old maid.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 16:48:37 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I just thought of \"a nice little old lady\" in the sense that tia is also another way of kindly (and tenderly) describing these women.

Robin Santos
Brazil
Local time: 00:54
PRO pts in pair: 4
Grading comment
Esta é complicada, eu sei, mas desde já agradeço a todos a vossa colaboração. Uma “tia” é alguém que acima de tudo é extremamente “snob”, sem ser necessariamente velha ou mexeriqueira. Embora “snob” descreva na perfeição o tipo de pessoa que as “tias” são, é uma palavra que infelizmente não me resolve o problema. “Madam” seria uma opção, se o texto fosse só para UK, mas como também é para US, não poderei utilizar este termo. Entretanto vou deixar “tia” (e.g. "tia" Helena went to her yoga class) e fornecer uma nota explicativa como sugere Robin. Se alguém tiver mais alguma ideia, agradeço que me contacte.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marian Greenfield: make that Old Maid (like the card game)
2 mins

agree  Enza Longo
17 mins

agree  Dito: snob, but maybe you are looking for more informal equivalents?
27 mins

agree  Sylvio Kauffmann
3 hrs

agree  Margarida Florida: snob
1 day23 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Yenta


Explanation:
Main Entry: yen·ta
Pronunciation: 'yen-t&
Function: noun
Etymology: Yiddish yente, from the name Yente
Date: 1923
: one that meddles; also : BLABBERMOUTH, GOSSIP

(pessoa faladeira.


    webster
grasa
Brazil
Local time: 20:54
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Dito: never heard it in UK
4 mins
  -> It si very used here, so it is I am familiar( perhaps because the US>NW has much of influence from Ireland) There are many local house cleaning business ( fofoqueiras, trabalham lequarando da vida alheia) Afirmo com certeza YENTA ta correto.

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: yenta is a Jewish term that is probably better known in the US but UK also...
7 mins
  -> Many hits on google

disagree  Robin Santos: I agree that these women do some of this, but the word is kind of harsh
8 mins
  -> so it Tia.. I would not want to be called "tia" in this context.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

48 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Style or Clothes Queen


Explanation:
In NY, one can prepend (!) words like style,nail, clothes etc to the word queen to mean a woman who is pretentious about some aspect of her being. Clothes queen, nail queen etc.

Re the Yenta: Yenta is the idea of an older woman who gossips about others; not someone concerned with their looks..a yenta is concerned with criticizing other women's looks

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 16:59:48 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ALSO: Gossip queen

PLEASE NOTE: THE WORD IS USED ALSO IN STRAIGHT TERMINOLOGY

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 17:08:22 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

FINAL: Style and gossip queen

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 3273
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
showy ladies


Explanation:
"showy" describes well their behaviour, it's all a show with these "tias", i.e. given to or marked by ostentation.

"showy" aqui indicaria um comportamento ostentoso e chamativo

Maria Luisa Duarte
Spain
Local time: 05:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 1916
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
"ladies who lunch"


Explanation:
Esta frase refere-se as senhoras da classe alta-media que sempre andam na moda, gostam de almocar em restaurantes chiques (elas nao trabalham porque nao tem necessidade). Elas sao fofoqueiras e gostam de falar de todo mundo. Elas so pensam em dinheiro e roupas e fofoca.

kda

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: I have never seen this expression
12 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
mutton dressed as lamb


Explanation:
This is an expression used in the UK (don't know about the US) when an older lady dresses up using clothes not appropriate for her age. These people usually act in the same way as the 'tias' you described

Neeharika Lorimer
Local time: 04:54
PRO pts in pair: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
snob is a noun


Explanation:
Ana. So pra dizer que a palavra snob nao se usa antes da palavra 'lady' porque eh substantivo. Pode dizer 'very snobbish lady'

Daniel Marcus
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:54
PRO pts in pair: 136
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search