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pedido procedente, improcedente e procedente em parte

English translation: petition (US:motion) affirmed / denied / affirmed in part

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Portuguese term or phrase:pedido procedente, improcedente e procedente em parte
English translation:petition (US:motion) affirmed / denied / affirmed in part
Entered by: Manuela Brehm
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14:40 Mar 19, 2002
Portuguese to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
Portuguese term or phrase: pedido procedente, improcedente e procedente em parte
tables justice
UK
Manuela Brehm
Local time: 17:15
Petition (US: motion) affirmed / denied / affirmed in part
Explanation:
Slightly different use in UK and US.

Please astate which you want in the future, thanks.

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Note added at 2002-03-19 15:08:38 (GMT)
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These are decisions made by a Judge.

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Note added at 2002-03-19 15:45:51 (GMT)
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Sorry Valentim: I just noticed you did mention UK! Thanks.

A \"Plea\", as given below, and even as quoted in the respective answer, is a declaration by the accused of \"guilty\" or \"not guilty\". It is not a \"pedido\".
\"Admissible\" etc. are decisions about evidence that can be heard in the case.
\"Request\" and \"granted\" are not legal terms in this context.
\"Application\" can be used in some cases, but here Petition is preferable.
Selected response from:

Theodore Fink
Local time: 12:15
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1Petition (US: motion) affirmed / denied / affirmed in part
Theodore Fink
5plea/ request/ application admissible, not admissible , partially admissibleTelesforo Fernandez
4 +1granted
Ligia Dias Costa
4Plea granted/denied/partly denied
BrazBiz
4valid demand , invalid (or "not valid"), partially validJH Trads


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
valid demand , invalid (or "not valid"), partially valid


Explanation:
instead of valid it is also possible:

having legal force / authority

I hope this helps


    exp legal
JH Trads
United States
Local time: 11:15
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 137
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Petition (US: motion) affirmed / denied / affirmed in part


Explanation:
Slightly different use in UK and US.

Please astate which you want in the future, thanks.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-19 15:08:38 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

These are decisions made by a Judge.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-19 15:45:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry Valentim: I just noticed you did mention UK! Thanks.

A \"Plea\", as given below, and even as quoted in the respective answer, is a declaration by the accused of \"guilty\" or \"not guilty\". It is not a \"pedido\".
\"Admissible\" etc. are decisions about evidence that can be heard in the case.
\"Request\" and \"granted\" are not legal terms in this context.
\"Application\" can be used in some cases, but here Petition is preferable.

Theodore Fink
Local time: 12:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 337
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rosemary Polato
32 mins
  -> Thanks, Rosemary. I really don't know what the others can be thinking about!!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
granted


Explanation:
I believe it is: granted, non-granted or partially granted

Ligia Dias Costa
Portugal
Local time: 17:15
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 194

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  barbarabt: Those are the right terms.
2 hrs
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
plea/ request/ application admissible, not admissible , partially admissible


Explanation:
This is the way I would translate it.
See the two texts :
Yes. Evidence of a withdrawn guilty plea is admissible in a civil action if the court
allowed the withdrawal of the plea as a matter of discretion and not as a ...


... provided in this rule, evidence of the following is not admissible against the
defendant who made the plea or was a participant in the plea discussions:


    Reference: http://www.law.cornell.edu/ny/ctap/comments/i98_0153.htm
    Reference: http://www.oalj.dol.gov/public/part18/refrnc/29_18b2.htm
Telesforo Fernandez
Local time: 21:45
PRO pts in pair: 128
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Plea granted/denied/partly denied


Explanation:
This is what we would use for UK law.

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Note added at 2002-03-19 16:20:05 (GMT)
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on reflection I think this refers to the type of decision handed down by a judge in chambers in the UK to an urgent request for a temporary course of action. Therefore it should be - injunction granted/denied/partly denied

BrazBiz
Brazil
Local time: 13:15
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 147
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