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Joao Santos

English translation: zhwaun

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Portuguese term or phrase:João
English translation:zhwaun
Entered by: Sormane Fitzgerald Gomes
Options:
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14:08 Jul 13, 2006
Portuguese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Linguistics
Portuguese term or phrase: Joao Santos
How to pronounce the name "Joao".

[zhoao] or [yoao] ?

Thanks

Conrext: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1452136
Igor Kreknin
Local time: 21:08
zhwaun (see below)
Explanation:
Let’s start with the first letter. In Portuguese, unlike Spanish, the
“J” is pronounced in a way similar (but not exactly) to how we say it
in English. In English, we really “hit” the “J” sound in words like
jug, jar, and, yes, even John. In Portuguese, the “J” is pronounced in
a slightly softer way (your tongue sort of hits the back of your teeth
when you pronounce it in English, but the Portuguese pronunciation has
you holding your tongue behind your teeth for a little bit longer) and
sounds like the first sound you hear in the name Zsa Zsa (as in
Gabor). When you say Zsa Zsa’s name, just say the “Zs” part out loud
(don’t pronounce the “a”) and keep making that sound. You’ve just said
the Portuguese “J” sound. (You should see me sitting here at my
computer and saying these sounds over and over again and thinking
about how to spell them!)

You go right into the next sound in “João.” Keep making that “Zs” (as
in Zsa Zsa) sound and go right into a “wuh” sound (like the very first
“wuh” sound in the word “wonder”). So now you have Zs + wuh . . .

. . . and from those sounds, you go right into the next sound (like a
cute phonetic train). Your next sound sort of starts in the middle of
that “wuh” sound (and here’s where it gets nasally—the tilde over the
“a” is your clue for that)—and goes right into a VERY nasally “ow”
sound that almost sounds like the “ow” in the English word “gown.” You
really open your mouth wider for that “ow” part. And you sort of
swallow the “w” so that you hardly hear it. Your lips form the “w” but
you don’t really pronounce it. It’s sort of how you wrap up the word
nicely, if that makes any sense. See? This is very tricky!

So, you put it all together (like cars of a train) and you’ve got “Zs”
(as in Zsa Zsa) + “wuh” (as in wonder) + “ow” (as in gown). Zs + wuh +
ow.

Here is a link from Merriam Webster with an audio sound for you to
hear to help you have an idea how to pronounce it:
http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/joao

Google Answers: Pronouncing Joao
In Portuguese, unlike Spanish, the “J” is pronounced in a way similar (but ... http://www.mw.com/dictionary/joao They list the pronunciation as: zhwaun (the ...
answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=738105 - 11k

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2006-07-13 14:23:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also here (female voice):

Joao Pessoa. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English ...
SYLLABICATION:, João Pes·so·a. PRONUNCIATION:, zhwou p -s. A city of northeast Brazil near the Atlantic Ocean north of Recife. ...
www.bartleby.com/61/62/J0046200.html - 20k
Selected response from:

Sormane Fitzgerald Gomes
United States
Local time: 14:08
Grading comment
Thanks a lot! Nice pronunciation in Portuguese, maybe to start learning it? :) All the best!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +5zhwaun (see below)Sormane Fitzgerald Gomes


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
zhwaun (see below)


Explanation:
Let’s start with the first letter. In Portuguese, unlike Spanish, the
“J” is pronounced in a way similar (but not exactly) to how we say it
in English. In English, we really “hit” the “J” sound in words like
jug, jar, and, yes, even John. In Portuguese, the “J” is pronounced in
a slightly softer way (your tongue sort of hits the back of your teeth
when you pronounce it in English, but the Portuguese pronunciation has
you holding your tongue behind your teeth for a little bit longer) and
sounds like the first sound you hear in the name Zsa Zsa (as in
Gabor). When you say Zsa Zsa’s name, just say the “Zs” part out loud
(don’t pronounce the “a”) and keep making that sound. You’ve just said
the Portuguese “J” sound. (You should see me sitting here at my
computer and saying these sounds over and over again and thinking
about how to spell them!)

You go right into the next sound in “João.” Keep making that “Zs” (as
in Zsa Zsa) sound and go right into a “wuh” sound (like the very first
“wuh” sound in the word “wonder”). So now you have Zs + wuh . . .

. . . and from those sounds, you go right into the next sound (like a
cute phonetic train). Your next sound sort of starts in the middle of
that “wuh” sound (and here’s where it gets nasally—the tilde over the
“a” is your clue for that)—and goes right into a VERY nasally “ow”
sound that almost sounds like the “ow” in the English word “gown.” You
really open your mouth wider for that “ow” part. And you sort of
swallow the “w” so that you hardly hear it. Your lips form the “w” but
you don’t really pronounce it. It’s sort of how you wrap up the word
nicely, if that makes any sense. See? This is very tricky!

So, you put it all together (like cars of a train) and you’ve got “Zs”
(as in Zsa Zsa) + “wuh” (as in wonder) + “ow” (as in gown). Zs + wuh +
ow.

Here is a link from Merriam Webster with an audio sound for you to
hear to help you have an idea how to pronounce it:
http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/joao

Google Answers: Pronouncing Joao
In Portuguese, unlike Spanish, the “J” is pronounced in a way similar (but ... http://www.mw.com/dictionary/joao They list the pronunciation as: zhwaun (the ...
answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=738105 - 11k

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2006-07-13 14:23:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also here (female voice):

Joao Pessoa. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English ...
SYLLABICATION:, João Pes·so·a. PRONUNCIATION:, zhwou p -s. A city of northeast Brazil near the Atlantic Ocean north of Recife. ...
www.bartleby.com/61/62/J0046200.html - 20k

Sormane Fitzgerald Gomes
United States
Local time: 14:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Thanks a lot! Nice pronunciation in Portuguese, maybe to start learning it? :) All the best!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  rhandler: Great explanation, Sormane. Your pronunciation key (like Google's) beats that of The American Heritage
43 mins
  -> Thanks, rhandler. I think so too, but I didn't write any of that. I found that online.

agree  Kemper Combs
54 mins
  -> Tks.

agree  Karen Haggerty: Yeah!
2 hrs
  -> Tks.

agree  Luciano Monteiro
8 hrs
  -> Tks.

agree  Michele Fauble: The Portuguese "j" sound is not normally found at the beginning of a word in English, but it does occur between vowels, as in 'treasure', 'pleasure', 'measure'.
12 hrs
  -> Tks. Great examples : - )
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Changes made by editors
Jul 13, 2006 - Changes made by Sormane Fitzgerald Gomes:
Field (specific)Sports / Fitness / Recreation » Linguistics
Jul 13, 2006 - Changes made by Sormane Fitzgerald Gomes:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


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