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raízes verbais quantificadoras, incorporadas ao verbo

English translation: quantifying verb roots embedded in the verb

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11:05 Sep 4, 2006
Portuguese to English translations [PRO]
Science - Linguistics / Verbs
Portuguese term or phrase: raízes verbais quantificadoras, incorporadas ao verbo
Além dessas duas formas apresentadas acima, a pluralidade da cláusula pode ser realizada por raízes verbais quantificadoras, incorporadas ao verbo
zabrowa
Local time: 18:23
English translation:quantifying verb roots embedded in the verb
Explanation:
What I REALLY think is more logical is to say "verb root quantifiers," and I'm tempted to think that the author made a mistake. You might want to put this on your list of queries. I do realize that this language has verb root compounds, so I guess it's possible the way it is stated, but it really doesn't make too much sense to me.

... and the Iterative, expressed by reduplication of the verb root. ... **suffixes which are attached to quantifiers and which classify the quantified word**. ...
www.ulcl.leidenuniv.nl/index.php3?c=73



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Note added at 7 days (2006-09-11 19:57:08 GMT)
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"Verb root quantifiers" would be morphemes added to the root with the function of quantifiers. On the other hand, "quantifying verb roots" would mean that the verb would have two roots, and this seems strange to me. My understanding is that when you create a compound (in this case, two roots), one of elements has to become the head. A compound means that the elements lose their individuality. I would assume that this applies to verb roots. And I would think that the author would be using the word "compound" if if fact he/she is talking about two roots conjoined. I could be wrong, but it just seems strange to me.
Selected response from:

Muriel Vasconcellos
United States
Local time: 09:23
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4quantifying verb roots embedded in the verb
Muriel Vasconcellos
3quantifier verbal root, incorporated into the verb
Cristiane Gomes


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
quantifier verbal root, incorporated into the verb


Explanation:
does it seem meaninful to you, Matt?

Cristiane Gomes
Brazil
Local time: 13:23
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
Notes to answerer
Asker: Not really! But I don't think it is your fault. I just wrote the author to see what she thinks... I'll let you know!

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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
quantifying verb roots embedded in the verb


Explanation:
What I REALLY think is more logical is to say "verb root quantifiers," and I'm tempted to think that the author made a mistake. You might want to put this on your list of queries. I do realize that this language has verb root compounds, so I guess it's possible the way it is stated, but it really doesn't make too much sense to me.

... and the Iterative, expressed by reduplication of the verb root. ... **suffixes which are attached to quantifiers and which classify the quantified word**. ...
www.ulcl.leidenuniv.nl/index.php3?c=73



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 days (2006-09-11 19:57:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"Verb root quantifiers" would be morphemes added to the root with the function of quantifiers. On the other hand, "quantifying verb roots" would mean that the verb would have two roots, and this seems strange to me. My understanding is that when you create a compound (in this case, two roots), one of elements has to become the head. A compound means that the elements lose their individuality. I would assume that this applies to verb roots. And I would think that the author would be using the word "compound" if if fact he/she is talking about two roots conjoined. I could be wrong, but it just seems strange to me.

Muriel Vasconcellos
United States
Local time: 09:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2542
Notes to answerer
Asker: I've asked the author. I'll keep you posted...

Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Sep 4, 2006:
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