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Diretoria Colegiada

English translation: College of Directors

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Portuguese term or phrase:Diretoria Colegiada
English translation:College of Directors
Entered by: Rosemary Polato
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12:44 Mar 24, 2002
Portuguese to English translations [PRO]
Portuguese term or phrase: Diretoria Colegiada
A Diretoria Colegiada da Agência..
Rosemary Polato
Brazil
Local time: 18:43
Round-table Board of Directors / College of Directors/ Full Board of Directors
Explanation:
First: Answering your "Directorate" question: No. This word is seldom used. A Group of Directors is called a Board of Directors unless there is some other title available. E.G. the directors of a Commission may be called Commissioners.

Now as to your original question:

"College" comes from the Latin root co-legere (to read together). It therefore means people who work together studying (and making decisions upon) written material.

It was mentioned above that this often means that there is no boss, head or chief. I don't believe that this is necessarily so.

The Supreme Court is collegiate, but there is a Chief Justice. And any meeting will turn to chaos unless there is, at least, a moderator.

In the strict sense, every Board of Directors (diretoria) is collegiate. They sit, they listen, they vote, they decide.

But, in this case, by emphasising the collegiate nature of the Directors, they mean something different.

I think that what they actually mean is "Round-table Board of Directors". You might even try "College of Directors" which would have exactly the same meaning in English as it would in Potuguese.

However, they might also mean that all the Directors are present. This would be the "Full Board of Directors"
Selected response from:

Theodore Fink
Local time: 17:43
Grading comment
Many thanks.
I liked "College of Directors" and will use it.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1The Board of Directors of the Agencies
Robert INGLEDEW
4Round-table Board of Directors / College of Directors/ Full Board of Directors
Theodore Fink
4Office of..
biancaf202


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
The Board of Directors of the Agencies


Explanation:
or the Board of Directors of the Association of Agencies.

I am not sure whether the context is commercial or Governmental agencies.

Hope this helps.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-24 13:51:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This implies shared government where each one of the Directors has the same authority. Something similar to the Swiss style of Government. It seems to imply that there is no General Director, but that all the members of the Board have the same authority.

Robert INGLEDEW
Argentina
Local time: 18:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 307

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr. Chrys Chrystello
10 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Office of..


Explanation:
Esample:
The main functions of the Office of the Attorney General are to have general charge, supervision and direction of the legal business of the State and to act as legal advisor and representative of the major departments, various boards, commissions, officials and institutions of State Government.

Plus, see sites below.


    Reference: http://www.fbi.gov/fbinbrief/todaysfbi/hqorg.htm
    Reference: http://caag.state.ca.us/
biancaf202
Local time: 16:43
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Round-table Board of Directors / College of Directors/ Full Board of Directors


Explanation:
First: Answering your "Directorate" question: No. This word is seldom used. A Group of Directors is called a Board of Directors unless there is some other title available. E.G. the directors of a Commission may be called Commissioners.

Now as to your original question:

"College" comes from the Latin root co-legere (to read together). It therefore means people who work together studying (and making decisions upon) written material.

It was mentioned above that this often means that there is no boss, head or chief. I don't believe that this is necessarily so.

The Supreme Court is collegiate, but there is a Chief Justice. And any meeting will turn to chaos unless there is, at least, a moderator.

In the strict sense, every Board of Directors (diretoria) is collegiate. They sit, they listen, they vote, they decide.

But, in this case, by emphasising the collegiate nature of the Directors, they mean something different.

I think that what they actually mean is "Round-table Board of Directors". You might even try "College of Directors" which would have exactly the same meaning in English as it would in Potuguese.

However, they might also mean that all the Directors are present. This would be the "Full Board of Directors"

Theodore Fink
Local time: 17:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 337
Grading comment
Many thanks.
I liked "College of Directors" and will use it.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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