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vo ves gorizont, neizvestno otkuda

English translation: Out of nowhere...

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10:29 Jun 2, 2002
Russian to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Russian term or phrase: vo ves gorizont, neizvestno otkuda
neizvestno otkuda poyavilsya grozovoy front vo ves gorizont.
Olga
English translation:Out of nowhere...
Explanation:
This is my suggestion for "neizvestno otkuda" - So: "Storm clouds appeared out of nowhere, covering the entire horizon" - or something to that effect...
Selected response from:

Emil Tubinshlak
Canada
Local time: 02:59
Grading comment
thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4Out of nowhere...Emil Tubinshlak
4 +3covering the entire horizon, out of nowhereJim F.
2 +4Storm clouds covering the entire horizon appeared from we knew not where
Jack Doughty
4 +2The storm front covering the whole horizon appeared from somewhereAYP
4out of the blue...
Victor Yatsishin
2spanning the horizon; out of nowheresteven tucker


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Storm clouds covering the entire horizon appeared from we knew not where


Explanation:
This is probably a literary text rather than a meteorological one, and I think the above describes the situation best, though not very close to a word-for-word translation.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14038

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  GaryG: or the literal "storm front", but perhaps that's US weather usage. For example, I've noticed that a forecast of "clear" in the US is "fine" in Australia
1 hr
  -> Thank you. Thought about "storm front" too but couldn't confirm that the expression exists.

agree  Jim F.: I like "storm front" too.
2 hrs

agree  myrafla: First of all, the original text is awkward -is it meteorologist writing novels? Shoot, what is the guy to do? Translate. OK. Second of all, the text is apparently literary. My version: "...Out of the blue the thunderclouds covered the entire horizon".
6 hrs
  -> Yes, it is odd; you could almost turn it into a poem: "Vo ves gorizont, grozovoy front".

agree  Сергей Лузан: we knew not where from - grammatically correct, but not so nice.
1 day2 hrs
  -> I don't think my word order is any less grammatically correct than yours. "We knew not whence" would be better grammatically but "whence" is rarely used.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
The storm front covering the whole horizon appeared from somewhere


Explanation:
-

AYP
Local time: 09:59
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 90

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Сергей Лузан: some place (???)
1 day25 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Milana_R
1 day17 hrs
  -> Thank you, Milana.
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Out of nowhere...


Explanation:
This is my suggestion for "neizvestno otkuda" - So: "Storm clouds appeared out of nowhere, covering the entire horizon" - or something to that effect...

Emil Tubinshlak
Canada
Local time: 02:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 153
Grading comment
thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jim F.
32 mins

agree  xxxBrainworks
11 hrs

agree  Сергей Лузан: Possible option.
22 hrs

agree  Milana_R
1 day15 hrs
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
covering the entire horizon, out of nowhere


Explanation:
a (the) storm front covering the entire horizon came out of nowhere. or storm clouds covering the entire horizon came out of nowhere.

For Olga: "thundery front" and "covering all horizon" are just too awkward in my opinion as a native English speaker, the use of either in isolated texts on the Internet notwithstanding. "Thunderhead" would be "grozovaya tucha" since a "thunderhead" is a type of cloud (cumulonimbus) or a part of a cloud. [see Webster's New Universal Unabbridged Dictionary] as I mentioned in my e-mail to you earlier.

Jim F.
United States
Local time: 02:59

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Olga Simon: You convinced me.
1 hr
  -> Thanks Olga.

agree  Сергей Лузан: It sounds quite pretty.
20 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Milana_R
1 day13 hrs
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
spanning the horizon; out of nowhere


Explanation:
(Seemingly or suddenly) out of nowhere there arose a storm front spanning (or that spanned) the horizon.

steven tucker
United States
Local time: 00:59
PRO pts in pair: 6
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1 day49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
out of the blue...


Explanation:
Storm clouds appeared out of the blue to cover the whole horizon.

Victor Yatsishin
Belarus
Local time: 09:59
PRO pts in pair: 4
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