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ага, угу, так...

English translation: ah! oh! I see!

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22:59 Jul 6, 2002
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Russian term or phrase: ага, угу, так...
В диалоге - собеседник № 1 (родной язык украинский) во время долгих реплик собеседника № 2 все врем употребляет эти слова.
Явно не в качестве согласия, просто для поддержания разговора, и желания вынудить второго говорить, говорить, говорить ...
Как это лучше перевести?
protolmach
United States
English translation:ah! oh! I see!
Explanation:
Douglas Adams likes "ah-oh", and of course there's always the supremely expressive hmm, wow, you don't say, really... etc.
Selected response from:

Yuri Geifman
Canada
Local time: 11:45
Grading comment
Thank you!
Special thanks to SERGEY for wonderful explanation!

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +9u-huh, mmm, yeah, right
Irene Chernenko
4 +6ah! oh! I see!
Yuri Geifman
5 -1ah or hmm
Libero_Lang_Lab
4alright, righhht, wellll, yeahhh sort of, ssssurexxxsergey
3sorry, it's still about 'blimey'xxxsergey


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
u-huh, mmm, yeah, right


Explanation:
that's it

Irene Chernenko
Russian Federation
Local time: 18:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 259

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  julls
3 hrs

agree  AYP
3 hrs

agree  Jolanta Schimenti: My two cents: aha, yes, yep, exactly, right, like that, O.K.,
5 hrs
  -> lol - the mind boggles

agree  Zoya ayoz
5 hrs

agree  rapid
7 hrs

agree  Yelena.
9 hrs

agree  Tatiana Neroni
1 day3 hrs

agree  Vitaliy Vorobyov
1 day10 hrs

agree  xxxOleg Pashuk
1 day15 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
ah! oh! I see!


Explanation:
Douglas Adams likes "ah-oh", and of course there's always the supremely expressive hmm, wow, you don't say, really... etc.

Yuri Geifman
Canada
Local time: 11:45
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 389
Grading comment
Thank you!
Special thanks to SERGEY for wonderful explanation!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  julls: u guys both are right ;)
3 hrs

agree  AYP
3 hrs

agree  Jolanta Schimenti
5 hrs

agree  Zoya ayoz
5 hrs

agree  Tatiana Neroni
1 day3 hrs

agree  Vitaliy Vorobyov
1 day10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
alright, righhht, wellll, yeahhh sort of, ssssure


Explanation:
that's what i normally utter

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Note added at 2002-07-07 14:04:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

also \'blimey\', \'crikey\', but that\'s BrE and the British always smile when they hear that from me

xxxsergey
Local time: 16:45
PRO pts in pair: 324
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20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
ah or hmm


Explanation:
There have been a variety of interjections or 'fillers' suggested, most of which could possibly be used. It depends
a) on strength of interjection required; ah and hmmm are the most non-committal and ambiguous if you like and based on what you have described I would go with them. Interjections such as right or uh-huh carry a little more implied opinion.
b) the tone or register of the dialogue
c) the character of the speaker. Things like Blimey and crikey are very old fashioned, far too expressive and generally used with a touch of irony in modern day (British) English.

Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:45
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1214

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  xxxsergey: 'blimey' and 'crikey' are not old fashioned at all, nothing ever becomes old fashioned in England from my experience! i hear them about once a week, but again i go to pubs in east london a lot, and they are used quite often when there is a need to fill a
14 hrs
  -> like i said, blimey and crikey are used in modern day english ( i use them myself, and as someone who was born in east london hear them quite often too). however, they do contain a nuance of irony. also v. regionally specific - south england only.
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1 day10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
sorry, it's still about 'blimey'


Explanation:
couldn't fit in everything i wanted to say in subtext -

'blimey' and 'crikey' are not old fashioned at all, nothing ever becomes old fashioned in England from my experience! i hear them about once a week, but again i go to pubs in east london a lot, and they are used quite often when there is a need to fill a gap in conversation. [blimey - also 'cor blimey' - Brit. coarse sl. (corrupt. of (god) blind me!)] - the other person sometimes would be even thinking about his own thing, but still say 'blimey' to keep the conversation going .... may be even as an excuse and to hide that he wasn't listening and lost me for a moment, hence the need to make it more expressive ... ...

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Note added at 2002-07-08 10:04:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ukrainians, belorussians, russians and the slavonic peoples in general are more phlegmatic and melancholic than, say, the english and west europeans, so when a ukrainian says \'ага, угу, так - понурив голову\' the english would say \'right\', alright, sure, \'blimey\' in the same situation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 10:05:06 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ukrainians, belorussians, russians and the slavonic peoples in general are more phlegmatic and melancholic than, say, the english and west europeans, so when a ukrainian says \'ага, угу, так - понурив голову\' the english would say \'right\', alright, sure, \'blimey\' in the same situation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 10:10:12 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ukrainians, belorussians, russians and the slavonic peoples in general are more phlegmatic and melancholic than, say, the english and west europeans, so when a ukrainian says \'ага, угу, так - понурив голову\' the english would say \'right\', alright, sure, \'blimey\' in the same situation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-08 10:18:37 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

i wonder why it\'s doing this when i click only once

xxxsergey
Local time: 16:45
PRO pts in pair: 324
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