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Привет, тезка!

English translation: Greetings to another (David)! Greetings to my namesake!

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Russian term or phrase:Привет, тезка!
English translation:Greetings to another (David)! Greetings to my namesake!
Entered by: David Welch
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14:17 Oct 17, 2002
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Russian term or phrase: Привет, тезка!
Как вообще по-английски это можно хорошо и бытовушно так сказать?
Oyra
Russian Federation
Local time: 19:57
Greetings to another (David)! Greetings to my namesake!
Explanation:
"Hi, namesake..." ? well, I have never heard it used in a greeting in English, although it could be done. If I sent an email to someone with "Hi, namesake" it seem odd.

So, "Greetings to another, or fellow, (David, Vera, Jose, Misha, etc..)" would just sound better....or, "Greetings to my namesake" would at least sound like English...

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Note added at 2002-10-17 16:23:31 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I would just add here that \"my namesake\" is used as a set phrase, rather than just \"namesake\" in English.

Of course, in Russian, it is natural to say \"тезка\" without \"моя\"....
Selected response from:

David Welch
United States
Local time: 12:57
Grading comment
Спасибо большое всем за комментарии!!! Интересно, откуда в русском языке взялось слово "тезка", жалко, что его в английском нету. :-(
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +7Greetings to another (David)! Greetings to my namesake!David Welch
5 +3Hi, Liza too!
Elizabeth Adams
4 +3Hi ! That's my name too!!Burravoe Ltd
3 +4Hi namesake!
Larissa Boutrimova
5Hi, my homonym! ; Hello, (my) homonym!xxxVera Fluhr
2 -1Snap!
Jack Doughty


  

Answers


24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Hi namesake!


Explanation:
Just like that

Larissa Boutrimova
Canada
Local time: 12:57
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 692

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxVera Fluhr: м.б. лучше с местоимением - my namesake ?
40 mins
  -> Да, наверное, лучше. Спасибо

agree  Olex
44 mins
  -> Спасибо

agree  Emil Tubinshlak: Or 'dear namesake'
1 hr
  -> Спасибо

neutral  xxxOleg Pashuk: I dont't think anybody says "namesake" in this way...
8 hrs

agree  Montefiore
14 hrs
  -> Thank you
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28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Snap!


Explanation:
Can't think of an answer to cover all circumstances, but this might work sometimes. If someone came up to me and said "Hello, my name's Jack Doughty", I might say "Snap!" before going on to say that was my name too.

(Comes from a card game in which you have to call "Snap!" if two cards of the same value are dealt out in succession to win the pile.)

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14042

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  David Welch: Жеры фунны, бут мост оф ус донт плаы санп!
1 hr
  -> I don't know anyone who plays sanp, but the expression is used even by people who don't know anything about snap.

neutral  Irene Chernenko: I know what you're getting at, Jack, but this is more commonly used when people happen to say the same thing at the same time. Aussie version: Jinx!
7 hrs
  -> Yes, I'm only saying it's possible, that's all. "Jinx" is interesting - I'd only ever heard that word as meaning a hoodoo, a kind of curse.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Hi, my homonym! ; Hello, (my) homonym!


Explanation:
Конечно, в совсем уж бытовушном варианте слово homonym имеет немного иронический оттенок..

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-17 15:39:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Определение термина (homonym = тезка ) и пример его употребления содержится здесь :

What happens if an homonym (same first name and last name) is already a Populis.com member? How can I sign up for Populis.com\'s services? ...
www.populis.com/en/help/faqregistration.htm

Еще один пример употребления (взят из интернетного чата):
Hello hello, my homonym ....
books.dreambook.com/jesselovesjames/lovepower.h

Ларисино предложение мне тоже нравится.
Слово namesake, по-моему, тоже можно употреблять и с местоимением, и с Hello вместо Hi
Например:

Hello namesake Signed on: Wed Jul 31 11:08:28 CDT 2002
www2.msstate.edu/~lgb4/guestbook.html

xxxVera Fluhr
Local time: 18:57
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 913

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxOleg Pashuk: Sorry, but I never heard this term (but then again, I never heard alotsa words:-)
13 hrs
  -> thanks for your remarks, please see the samples above
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
Greetings to another (David)! Greetings to my namesake!


Explanation:
"Hi, namesake..." ? well, I have never heard it used in a greeting in English, although it could be done. If I sent an email to someone with "Hi, namesake" it seem odd.

So, "Greetings to another, or fellow, (David, Vera, Jose, Misha, etc..)" would just sound better....or, "Greetings to my namesake" would at least sound like English...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-17 16:23:31 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I would just add here that \"my namesake\" is used as a set phrase, rather than just \"namesake\" in English.

Of course, in Russian, it is natural to say \"тезка\" without \"моя\"....

David Welch
United States
Local time: 12:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 59
Grading comment
Спасибо большое всем за комментарии!!! Интересно, откуда в русском языке взялось слово "тезка", жалко, что его в английском нету. :-(

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Larissa Boutrimova: Possibly. :-))
37 mins

agree  Irene Chernenko: This is by far the most natural-sounding suggestion for something that English speakers tend not to say.
42 mins
  -> Yes, this is just my point. We rarely use this.

agree  zmejka: greetings to my namesake - !!
1 hr

agree  marfus: w/Irene Chernenko
7 hrs

agree  Mark Vaintroub
8 hrs

agree  Montefiore
13 hrs

agree  Zoya ayoz
14 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Hi ! That's my name too!!


Explanation:
Another more natural expression.

Burravoe Ltd
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:57
PRO pts in pair: 50

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jack Doughty: Probably better than my suggestion.
3 mins

agree  marfus
6 hrs

agree  Zoya ayoz
13 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Hi, Liza too!


Explanation:
Hi (name) too!
Hi (name) number 2!
Hi other (name)!
Hi wannabe!

ok, I'm regressing to elementary school at this point, but adults do not really make a big deal of the fact that they have the same name. Sorry, but it's true

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-17 16:55:05 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

and you could only use these if you already knew the person (please don\'t try this with a new acquaintance)

Elizabeth Adams
United States
Local time: 09:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 252

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexandre Khalimov: what about name-brother? just asking
4 mins
  -> I wouldn't, but maybe someone else would.

agree  xxxOleg Pashuk
6 hrs

agree  artyan
11 hrs
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