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радио-"тарелка"

English translation: wireless

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Russian term or phrase:радиоточка (устар.)
English translation:wireless
Entered by: Elaine Freeland
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21:52 Jan 5, 2003
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Russian term or phrase: радио-"тарелка"
This is a very basic one-station radio receiver Russian people were provided with during the World War II. They started to make them in 1932, if I'm not mistaken. It was a black cardboard dish without, if I remember correctly, even a volume knob.

On second thoughts, any recognisable to an English speaker type of a war-time radio might do. This given work allows me to play with different names (not necessarily a Russian "dish" as such): all I need is that the image of a "war radio" announcing air raids and all-clears is familiar enough to the English-speaking readers.

(But if there used to be anything remotely resembling that cardboard dish, I'd rather go for it.)

Thank you!

Elaine
Elaine Freeland
Local time: 10:57
Tannoy?
Explanation:
This is a difficult one. I lived through German air raids in London during the war. Air raid warnings were given by sirens. They were not given by radio as such, but could be given by a public address system, which might be broadcasting a radio programme but could be interrupted for such a warning. The loudspeakers were usually made by a firm called Tannoy. A Tannoy loudspeaker was a square wooden box with a round fretwork panel in the middle of it, behind which was the loudspeaker itself. The name "Tannoy" was picked out in the fretwork. It became a generic name, as "Hoover" did for vacuum cleaners, and something might be said to be announced "over the Tannoy" whatever sort of loudspeakers were used.
But you couldn't really call this a radio, so it might not do for your purpose.

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Note added at 2003-01-06 07:00:46 (GMT)
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Radio/wireless
Although the word \"radio\" was widely used during the Second World War, the more common colloquial term at that time for radio in general or for a domestic radio set was \"wireless\".
So that might give it a bit more of a period flavour.
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:57
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for your detailed and thoughtful answers! And especial thanks to Mr Doughty -- I believe I need to go for wireless, and Tannoy, too, is a precious addition to my modest cerebral database. Have a good week! Elaine
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3Russian WWII radio with flat, hard-paper speakerxxxOleg Pashuk
3Dynamic
Mark Vaintroub
2Tannoy?
Jack Doughty
1Tarelka - Tarielka
Jack Slep
1speaker cone
Yuri Geifman


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Dynamic


Explanation:
just a very weak thought...

Mark Vaintroub
Canada
Local time: 04:57
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 675
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Tannoy?


Explanation:
This is a difficult one. I lived through German air raids in London during the war. Air raid warnings were given by sirens. They were not given by radio as such, but could be given by a public address system, which might be broadcasting a radio programme but could be interrupted for such a warning. The loudspeakers were usually made by a firm called Tannoy. A Tannoy loudspeaker was a square wooden box with a round fretwork panel in the middle of it, behind which was the loudspeaker itself. The name "Tannoy" was picked out in the fretwork. It became a generic name, as "Hoover" did for vacuum cleaners, and something might be said to be announced "over the Tannoy" whatever sort of loudspeakers were used.
But you couldn't really call this a radio, so it might not do for your purpose.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-06 07:00:46 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Radio/wireless
Although the word \"radio\" was widely used during the Second World War, the more common colloquial term at that time for radio in general or for a domestic radio set was \"wireless\".
So that might give it a bit more of a period flavour.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14042
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for your detailed and thoughtful answers! And especial thanks to Mr Doughty -- I believe I need to go for wireless, and Tannoy, too, is a precious addition to my modest cerebral database. Have a good week! Elaine
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
speaker cone


Explanation:
I've seen that mentioned in some book, I think it just means a radio speaker cone.

Yuri Geifman
Canada
Local time: 04:57
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 389
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Russian WWII radio with flat, hard-paper speaker


Explanation:
Here is the picture of it:
http://www-koi8-r.edu.yar.ru/russian/tvorch/garnov/twerizy/e...

Or:
Broadcasting receiver with flat paper speaker
http://home.onego.ru/~vitalybr/tran.htm

Or simply:
Ekco AD65–type radio
www.vintageradio.co.uk/radiosales2.htm




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Note added at 2003-01-05 23:54:26 (GMT)
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Old flat-dish radio?

xxxOleg Pashuk
PRO pts in pair: 619
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
Tarelka - Tarielka


Explanation:
Sorry, Elaine, this is of no help, but the alternate transliteration in a Google search offer the following site about a "dish" (UFO)". FYI... Interesting....

http://home.dmv.com/~tbastian/russ.htm

Jack Slep
Local time: 04:57
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 2126
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