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Что ты имеешь в виду? Что имею то и введу.

English translation: What's your point? - 12 inches long and pointy!

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13:47 Apr 29, 2009
Russian to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Russian term or phrase: Что ты имеешь в виду? Что имею то и введу.
Hello everyone

I know what the above means, but i'm struggling to find a solution.

Thanks for your help.
Lucy Collins
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:05
English translation:What's your point? - 12 inches long and pointy!
Explanation:
I thought I'd rise up to the challenge too.

Sounds a little more vulgar than in Russian, but the idea is more or less the same.

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Note added at 10 days (2009-05-09 20:57:26 GMT) Post-grading
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Thank you, Lucy!
Selected response from:

Aleksey Chervinskiy
United States
Local time: 19:05
Grading comment
I think this fits in well with the tone of the rest of the text well which is quite colloquial. It's also very idiomatic.

It is slightly more explicit than the Russian, but I don't think many readers would find it offensive - the British like a bit of innuendo!

Fantastic translation.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +8- What do you imply?! - Whatever I have, I will apply!
Alexander Onishko
5Pun (look for an explanation inside)
Alexandra Liashchenko
3 +2What's your point? - 12 inches long and pointy!
Aleksey Chervinskiy
4Nothing mean, that’s what I mean/
Andrew Vdovin
4meaning
Larissa Dinsley
3 +1What do you mean? What you see is what I mean.
Angela Greenfield
3What's your point? "Where am I to put my 'point' " - now that's the question.MatthewLaSon
2 +1see explanation
Evgenia Starkova
3What have you got in mind? What I've got a mind to put in.
Michael Korovkin
3I didn't get it - What you see is what you get
Dulat
3play around with...IronDog
Summary of reference entries provided
this is slangy-dirty
Vladimir Dubisskiy

Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Pun (look for an explanation inside)


Explanation:
This should be translated not literally but using an in-tune equival


Alexandra Liashchenko
United States
Local time: 19:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in category: 18
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
- What do you imply?! - Whatever I have, I will apply!


Explanation:
:)

Alexander Onishko
Local time: 02:05
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in category: 71

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tatiana Lammers: something like that =)
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Tatiana!

agree  sukirat anand: by far the naughtiest of this lot
2 hrs
  -> Thank you :)

agree  Aleksey Chervinskiy
2 hrs

agree  Anna Fominykh & family
2 hrs

agree  svetlana cosquéric
3 hrs

agree  Arkadi Burkov
4 hrs

agree  Alexander Kupriyanchuk: It is also possible to make this translation rythmic, shorter and more explicit: "What do you imply?! / WHAT I have - I will apply!" (This irregularity with "what" fits into the style and context). :))
5 hrs

agree  klp
5 days
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
see explanation


Explanation:
Here is my variant, though it isn't perfect, it can give you an idea to work with:
"I don't understand what you mean, somehow it doesn't stick."
"I can stick it in for you!"
(Or: "I will stick mine in, no problem")

Evgenia Starkova
Netherlands
Local time: 01:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Russian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anna Fominykh & family
2 hrs
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
play around with...


Explanation:
assert/insert...

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Note added at 40 mins (2009-04-29 14:27:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

For example, "Is this an assertion? -- No, it's an insertion."

IronDog
Local time: 04:05
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Alexander Kupriyanchuk: A very good direction, too. However, this is a rhyme, not a play of words, and MORE explicit and even ruder that the Russian original.
6 hrs
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
What do you mean? What you see is what I mean.


Explanation:
I would stick to the original.

In Russian one can understand this elusion as both obscene and not so much so. Depends on the intention of the speaker and the corrupted morals of the listener. :-)



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 43 mins (2009-04-29 14:30:44 GMT)
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Часто пишут по другому: что имею, то и в вИду. (на слух воспринимается как "введу", отсюда игра слов). По крайней мере, раньше так, как у вас написано, не писали. Это в последнее время стали писатьс "е", чтобы у читателя уже точно сомнения не было в отношении того что они имеют В ВИДУ. ;-))

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Note added at 1 hr (2009-04-29 15:09:13 GMT)
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Фраза происходит из очень старой серии анекдотов о поручике (или же все-таки поруТчике??) Ржевском и Наташе. Вот этот анекдот:
Танцует порутчик Ржевский с Наташей Ростовой на балу. Порутчик прижымаетНаташу к стенке.- Ржевский, вы хотите меня розпять?- Разшесть.- Что, вы имеете в виду?- Что, имею то и в виду.

В начале своей жизни эта фраза писалась через "И", но воспринималась на слух совершенно однозначно. :-)

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Note added at 1 hr (2009-04-29 15:12:03 GMT)
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Ошибки в правописании не мои, а с сайта "Анекдот.ру"

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Note added at 1 hr (2009-04-29 15:18:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Альберт Иорданов. Эротические рассказы http://www.proza.ru/2007/12/04/56


Angela Greenfield
United States
Local time: 19:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in category: 112

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tevah_Trans: Angela, do you have a quote of the "в виду"? Because I've always seen it in the obsene way, but would love to see if it's mentioned that way someplace. Thanks!
26 mins
  -> даю

agree  Anna Fominykh & family
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Anna.

neutral  Alexander Kupriyanchuk: agree re. the notes above. If it were “в виду”, I'd be even more committed supporter. Your version can be admired. It (and “в виду”) is intended for well-bred people with good manners, in other word, for a tiny minority:) “Введув
6 hrs
  -> Thanks!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
meaning


Explanation:
I believe, the actual meaning is: What do you mean? - Don't ask stupid questions. You know what I mean.
The rest is folklore. :) As long as you can find something which sounds as obscene as this. And it is definitely obscene.

Larissa Dinsley
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:05
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in category: 51
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13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
I didn't get it - What you see is what you get


Explanation:
- I didn't get it.
- What you see is what you get.

Dulat
Kazakhstan
Local time: 06:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
What have you got in mind? What I've got a mind to put in.


Explanation:
Very vulgar and silly – in both languages. The retards' talk.

Michael Korovkin
Italy
Local time: 01:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 104
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1 day16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Nothing mean, that’s what I mean/


Explanation:
What do you mean?
Nothing mean, that’s what I mean.


Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 07:05
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 83
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
What's your point? - 12 inches long and pointy!


Explanation:
I thought I'd rise up to the challenge too.

Sounds a little more vulgar than in Russian, but the idea is more or less the same.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 days (2009-05-09 20:57:26 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thank you, Lucy!

Aleksey Chervinskiy
United States
Local time: 19:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Russian
PRO pts in category: 28
Grading comment
I think this fits in well with the tone of the rest of the text well which is quite colloquial. It's also very idiomatic.

It is slightly more explicit than the Russian, but I don't think many readers would find it offensive - the British like a bit of innuendo!

Fantastic translation.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexandra Taggart: Could not be better translated!
2 hrs
  -> Спасибо!

agree  Dmitry Venyavkin
2 hrs
  -> Спасибо!

agree  Vladimir Dubisskiy: this is it.
2 hrs
  -> Спасибо!

disagree  Alexander Kupriyanchuk: A naturalism, not a play on words! By far more explicit/rude than the original. Especially with that lenght. Unless the character is Stallone at the start of his career, who was famous for the “12 inches long…” Analogies with porno and porno stars not OK.
3 hrs
  -> You make a good point in support of my statement that it's more vulgar than the Russian phrase. 12 Inches shouldn't be taken literally, of course (not even in Stallone's case). It's a hyperbole, and by no means do I insist on that number.

neutral  Michael Korovkin: What a disapointment! And I was ready to tell my female students that I know a guy in the States – with 12". Would've stimulated the trasatlantic air travel something awful! But really, your version is really good, the number of inches notwithstanding
11 days
  -> Veni, vidi, agnosci... Пришел Коровкин и понял все буквально
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1477 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
What's your point? "Where am I to put my 'point' " - now that's the question.


Explanation:
Hello,

The best that I can do.


I hope this helps.

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Note added at 1477 days (2013-05-16 01:12:16 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

What's your point? "Where am I to put my 'point'?" - now that's the question.

MatthewLaSon
Local time: 19:05
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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Reference comments


1 hr peer agreement (net): +5
Reference: this is slangy-dirty

Reference information:
this is slangy-dirty answer (especially with that "vvEdu" if some sex-related talks/relationships are present and, especially, if it was said by a male. I mean if, say, a question was asked by a female and the answer provided by a male.

Vladimir Dubisskiy
United States
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in category: 39

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Tatiana Lammers
23 mins
agree  Anna Fominykh & family
1 hr
agree  Alexander Kupriyanchuk
4 hrs
agree  Alexandra Taggart
6 hrs
agree  klp
5 days
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