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ликующая гопота

English translation: triumphant yobs

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07:48 Apr 1, 2008
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Journalism / politics
Russian term or phrase: ликующая гопота
This is from an article by Yulia Latynina about Nashi. It appears in the title and once in the text:

страшная месть "ликующей гопоты"

«Коммерсантъ» написал статью о том, что Кремль отправил «Наших» в отставку. «В нынешних условиях ликующая гопота не нужна», – приводились в статье слова одного из кремлевских чиновников.

I can't find the term anywhere, although from the general tone of the article I'm guessing its either a swear word or slang.

Please help!
xxxmark_youngma
Local time: 07:58
English translation:triumphant yobs
Explanation:
.

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Note added at 19 mins (2008-04-01 08:07:58 GMT)
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It's somewhat close to `rednecks' in American English usage.

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Note added at 39 mins (2008-04-01 08:27:24 GMT)
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Taking into account that Nashi is a rather miltant movement of young people who often behave violent and whose political views are `black & white', with the blind support of Putin's regime (that's why `triumphant' or `elated'), the phrase sounds very logical. It's not a swear word, but rather a disdainful, pejorative word. A collective noun for the big mass or crowd of uneducated and aggressive young men.
Selected response from:

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 09:58
Grading comment
Thanks very much everyone for your help. It's filled the big hole in my translation!
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
1 +5triumphant yobs
Kirill Semenov
3 +1jubilant riff-raffchap
3jubilant riff-raffchap
3 -1what i think
Vladimir Dubisskiy


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +5
triumphant yobs


Explanation:
.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 mins (2008-04-01 08:07:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It's somewhat close to `rednecks' in American English usage.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 39 mins (2008-04-01 08:27:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Taking into account that Nashi is a rather miltant movement of young people who often behave violent and whose political views are `black & white', with the blind support of Putin's regime (that's why `triumphant' or `elated'), the phrase sounds very logical. It's not a swear word, but rather a disdainful, pejorative word. A collective noun for the big mass or crowd of uneducated and aggressive young men.

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 09:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 11
Grading comment
Thanks very much everyone for your help. It's filled the big hole in my translation!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Oleksandr Melnyk: Согласен с тем, что термин "гопота" происходит от слова "гопник". Точного перевода не знаю.
7 mins
  -> yob - это я нашёл именно британский вариант. Вроде бы подходит по описанию.

agree  ayast: apparently so, however you redneck reference i'm not altogether sure about, it's rather a marginalized youth from a working family often a small-time criminal
34 mins
  -> Yes, that's why I said it was "somewhat close". Just to give an idea of the meaning. :)

agree  Konstantin Kisin: Good one.
51 mins

agree  Olga Judina
10 hrs

agree  Vladimir Chumak: Их называют "гопники". Их называют "жлобы". Их называют урлой, а также лохами, иногда - шпаной. Их называют и хамами. Но имя им - гопнички. (c) Майк Науменко
17 hrs
  -> Точно, Майк. И ещё там же: "Это гопники! Это гопники! Они мешают мне жить"
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
jubilant riff-raff


Explanation:
One of many possible versions

chap

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Shelley Fairweather-Vega: Current Digest of the Post-Soviet Press used "jubilant street rowdies" to translate this term in the original Kommersant article cited.
6 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
jubilant riff-raff


Explanation:
One of possible versions

chap
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
what i think


Explanation:
it's "ликующая голота"

from Ukrainian holota (golota) = Russian голь, голытьба = the poor, destitute

exultant destitute crowd

or even (considering the attitude of the author)

exultant, triumphant lowlifes, thugs, ruffians

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Note added at 23 mins (2008-04-01 08:11:34 GMT)
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By the way:

Please consider that the phrase "страшная месть" can be reminiscent of the story by famous classical writer Nikolai Gogol with the very same name ("Cтрашная месть" or Terrible Revenge) and that story has strong Ukrainian colouring, so to say - it can be related with the usage of (also Ukrainian) word 'golota"

Nikolai Gogol
Evenings near the village of Dikanka, Part 2, A Terrible Revenge.

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Note added at 21 hrs (2008-04-02 05:35:01 GMT)
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Interesting enough but my version about

exultant, triumphant lowlifes, thugs, ruffians

seems to fit no matter it's "goPota" or "goLota" :-))

(simply because both words turned to be pretty close in meaning)


Vladimir Dubisskiy
United States
Local time: 01:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you. The info about Gogol was particularly useful.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Kirill Semenov: "гоПота" is related to "гоПники", so no mistakes here in the source Russian. "ГоПники" are mainly rednecks. + Владимир, это совершенно разные слова. "ГопотА" - ударение на последний слог. Неужели никогда не слышали про "гопников"?
5 mins
  -> consider it together with "страшная месть" see my note поэтому я и написал, что просто так подумалось. Про "гопников" слышал, "гоПота" не слышал никогда.

agree  ayast: lowlifes, thugs, ruffians no doubt, but it's only by accident that gopnik and golota are semantically similar
45 mins
  -> yes, thank you, - that's why I put "what i think"

disagree  Mikhail Kropotov: A figment of your ailing imagination, nothing more
6 hrs
  -> says who? :-))

neutral  Olga Judina: Я, вроде бы, и не отрицала, что "Страшная месть" IS the name of Gogol's work. А вот где у Гоголя про гопников?
1 day1 hr
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