KudoZ home » Russian to English » Military / Defense

Честь имею!

English translation: I am honored!

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
11:38 Jun 16, 2005
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Military / Defense / Idioms/Jargon
Russian term or phrase: Честь имею!
The expression that ends every military award or retirement ceremony. My question is, when the honoree makes this terse statement, what exactly is the thought? Is it simply that "It has been my honor [to serve]"? Or is it that "I am a man of honor", or "I am leaving/I stand with my honor [intact]", or "I have stood the test of honor." Any pithy 3-4 syllable translations?
xxxJoeYeckley
English translation:I am honored!
Explanation:
Or honoured, as I would spell it. I don't think we have an exact equivalent.
The formula for ending any sort of official letter or application in the RAF was "I have the honour to remain, Sir, Your Obedient Servant". I always thought this was excessively grovelling.
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:37
Grading comment
Truly the best literal translation. Still doesn't ring well... It seems too delicate a phrase for the VDV tough receiving his award for heroism. Something *barkable* like "Proud to Serve!" sounds better, but at the cost of losing the cultural/historical flavor.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +9I am honored!
Jack Doughty
5 +1I have the honour (to ask, to declare, to report)
Yuri Smirnov
5Честь имею! = Honour I have !
Alexander Onishko
4May I take my leave, or similar...
Nina Tchernova
1 +2below please2rush
2"I have (the) honour!"
Kirill Semenov
2My honor!
Magister


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Честь имею!
Честь имею! = Honour I have !


Explanation:
Военная литература : Проза : Пикуль В.С. Честь имею. Исповедь ...
Пикуль Валентин Саввич Честь имею. Исповедь офицера Генштаба ... Пикуль В.С.
Честь имею. — М.: Голос, 1996. 1996 — 576 с. Тираж 1 000 000 (2-й завод 100 001 ...
militera.lib.ru/prose/russian/pikul6/title.html -
====
Pikul V..-Honour I have. :: RusKniga.com :: St. Petersburg ::
... [Advanced Search]. Web Camera in our Store. Books Number in catalogue: B-797. Order
FREE Catalogue by phone: 1-800-531-1037. Pikul V..- " Honour I have. ". ...
www.rusbooks.com/sell.asp?ItemId=797

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2005-06-16 11:46:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

аnother variant -> \"Have Honor\"

eBooks
Have Honor by Pikul. 12/01/2004. Novels. iSilo3. 53. Pendekar Sadis by Asmaraman
Kho Ping Ho. 09/19/2004. Novels. LIT. 724. Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. ...
www.memoware.com/?start=0&screen=search_ results&sort_by=rating&p=category%5E!Novels~!

Alexander Onishko
Local time: 06:37
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in category: 46

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Magister: Александр, думаю, что в качестве перевода названия романа В.Пикуля Ваш вариант безупречен, так как хорошо передает главный смысл высказывания и его эмоциональную окраску. Вопрос же, задан, думается, по поводу фразы, являющейся просто формой прощания.
13 mins

neutral  Yuri Smirnov: Правильный пример неправильного употребления
20 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
Честь имею!
I am honored!


Explanation:
Or honoured, as I would spell it. I don't think we have an exact equivalent.
The formula for ending any sort of official letter or application in the RAF was "I have the honour to remain, Sir, Your Obedient Servant". I always thought this was excessively grovelling.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 212
Grading comment
Truly the best literal translation. Still doesn't ring well... It seems too delicate a phrase for the VDV tough receiving his award for heroism. Something *barkable* like "Proud to Serve!" sounds better, but at the cost of losing the cultural/historical flavor.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yuri Smirnov: That's it. Gorvelling. But they use it nowadays as proud! That's what I am talking about.
3 mins
  ->  Thank you. It's used that way in English too.

agree  Kirill Semenov
12 mins
  ->  Thank you.

agree  Kurt Porter
27 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Michael Moskowitz: And so am I.
46 mins
  -> Thank you. And I by you.

agree  James Fite
2 hrs
  ->  Thank you.

agree  Blithe
2 hrs
  ->  Thank you.

agree  Dorene Cornwell
10 hrs
  ->  Thank you.

agree  Robert Donahue
1 day22 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Kevin Kelly
3 days23 hrs
  -> Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Честь имею!
My honor!


Explanation:
I think it must mean "I'm a man of honor", and I would tanslate it as
"My honor!" It's quite simple,too.

Magister
Local time: 06:37
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 16
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Честь имею!
"I have (the) honour!"


Explanation:
This is a standard polite formula for a military/police officer. Something close to "esprit de corps!" or the stating his appreciation of the honour of the regiment. In old times the phrase was used mostly when leaving a gathering (accompanied by saluting gesture) or when introducing himself (Честь имею представиться) or when greeting someone. You may find a proper phrase which is said in such cases in English when a military man renders a salute.

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 06:37
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 20
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Честь имею!
I have the honour (to ask, to declare, to report)


Explanation:
Заголовок статьи “Честь имею!” - фразеологическое выражение. Согласно толковым словарям русского языка, это выражение – устарелое, употребляется со словами просить, предложить, сообщить как формула вежливости в речи, обращенной к вышестоящему лицу (см. Ожегов С. И. и Шведова Н. Ю. Толковый словарь русского языка. М., 1997, стр. 882, статья честь, заромбовая часть).
http://www.expertizy.narod.ru/prim/pr002.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 mins (2005-06-16 11:48:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A politeness formula towards the higher-status person.
Recently it starts being used wrongly (mostly by the military) in the meaning not of being honoured to do something, but of having the honour as such.
Alexander Onishko\'s example is a perfect illustration of this, newly assigned, meaning to the old formula.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2005-06-16 11:55:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Осипов Валерий Данилович - \"Единый язык человечества\"
\"Старорежимное\" выражение из лексикона военных \"честь имею\" стали понимать, как
офицерский аутотренинг, как напоминание себе и другим того, ...
www.universalinternetlibrary.ru/book/osipov/4.shtml

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2005-06-16 11:58:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t know why, but it doesn\'t let me copy the whole paragraph from the above given link. But it repeats just what I said: nowadays it\'s being used wrongly.

Yuri Smirnov
Local time: 06:37
Native speaker of: Native in BelarusianBelarusian, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vladimir Dubisskiy: not sure about nowadays - i doubt if anybody is using it... - only as a joke, probably (unfortunately)
14 hrs
  -> Да вы что! Российское телевидение не смотрите? Круглые сутки! Офицеры, офицеры... И Пикуль туда же, и вот, к примеру... http://www.cn.com.ua/N196/politics/monologues/monologues.htm... Сплошь и рядом!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Честь имею!
May I take my leave, or similar...


Explanation:
Sometimes it is just a part of a set phrase which runs as follows: Честь имею откланяться, meaning simply an elaborate leave-taking

Nina Tchernova
Local time: 11:37
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Честь имею!
below please


Explanation:
1. Честь имею, имею честь
- Формула учтивого, вежливого обращения; (просить, предложить, сообщить) формула вежливости в речи, обращенной к вышестоящему лицу:
Честь имею представиться. Иванов
Имею честь представить вам моего друга.
I have the honour to acquaint you with the following — офиц. имею честь сообщить вам следующее
I beg to report — осмелюсь /имею честь/ доложить
I have the honour to inform you — имею честь сообщить вам
to whom have I the honour of speaking? — с кем имею честь (говорить)?
I have the honour to inform you that — офиц. (я) имею честь сообщить Вам, что...
I have the honour to report — имею честь сообщить

2. Честь имею, честь имею кланяться
- Прощайте, до свидания; формула вежливого официального приветствия при прощании:
Очень жалко, что напрасно обеспокоил.. Честь имею кланяться.

"...До революции признаком хорошего воспитания у мужчин было приветствие: "Здравия желаю!", прощались словами: "Честь имею!"..."
http://www.speakrus.ru/articles/strel1.htm


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs 37 mins (2005-06-17 03:16:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

А вот интересные выдержки из идеографического словаря:
\"приветствую!\" (выражаю приветствие)
- \"здравствуй<те>! прост: здорово. здорово живете [живешь].
- \"здравия желаю [желаем]. привет (разг). приветствую <вас>.
- \"мое [наше] почтение (устар). наше вам <с кисточкой> (прост).
- \"честь имею (устар). | очень приятно.
- \"низкий вам поклон.
- \"примите уверения в совершеннейшем почтении (устар).
- \"как живете-можете?\" (прост).
- \"доброе утро! с добрым утром! добрый день! добрый вечер!
- \"добро пожаловать!
- \"хлеб да соль! чай да сахар!
- \"на здоровье (носите рубашку #).


\"пока!\" (расставание)
- \"до <скорого> свидания [-ья]. до скорого (разг).
- \"до встречи. до завтра.
- \"прощай<те>. | пока.
- \"всего доброго. всего (прост).
- \"всего хорошего [наилучшего.лучшего].
- \"всех благ (разг). | будь<те> здоров<ы>.
- \"не поминай<те> лихом. | честь имею <кланяться>.
- \"доброго пути. счастливого пути!
- \"в добрый час! в добрый путь!
- \"счастливо оставаться! | наше вам <с кисточкой> (прост).
- \"мое [наше] почтение!
- \"попутного ветра! семь футов под килем!
- \"спокойной ночи.

http://rhymes.amlab.ru/thesaurus/thes_56.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs 47 mins (2005-06-17 03:26:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"... в нашем воинском приветствии «здравия желаю» сохранилась старославянская форма русского слова «здоровье», давно вышедшая из обихода...\"
http://www.znanie-sila.ru/golden/issue_60.html

\"Здравствуй! - приветствие, пожелание здоровья наряду со \"Здравия желаю!\", которое применялось и во множественном числе. После 1917 года особенно прижились иностранные формы приветствия: \"Доброе утро!\", \"Добрый день!\" и т.д., которые не несут энергетики пожелания здоровья, а фиксируют факт состояния погодных условий. Пожеланием приятных обстоятельств (но не здравия) и дополнением к основному приветствию эти выражения могут стать только в форме: \" С добрым:\"...\"
http://sozonov.udm.net/dict.htm


2rush
Kazakhstan
Local time: 08:37
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ann Nosova
6 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Vladimir Dubisskiy: по моему до революции "здравия желаю" в качестве приветствия из "воспитанных" мужчин употребляли только дворники и городовые(ну, отставные унтера, может быть) :-))) А в остальном, что ж, верно.
14 hrs
  -> Возможно Вы и правы ;)) Хотя, думаю, пожелать здоровья никому не возбраняется, что я и сделаю, воспользовавшись случаем... ;) Здравия желаю Вам и всем-всем-всем!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search