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Хоу Король Леса

English translation: ....King of the Forest

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13:54 Aug 10, 2002
Russian to English translations [PRO]
/ Name of a racehorse
Russian term or phrase: Хоу Король Леса
It is the Russian rendition of the name of a stallion belonging to King Edward VII of England. Faberge made a figurine of it for the king in 1909. The first part of the name may be a faulty rendition.
John Sowerby
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:52
English translation:....King of the Forest
Explanation:
Not sure about that first word, but I suspect that the rest of the name would be as above as it sounds more like the name of a horse...

Not much help.... but I did dig out this link which I think might lead you to the answer. It is from the International Museum of the Horse (oh yes, there is such a thing - in Kentucky):

http://www.imh.org/imh/imhmain.html


In particular there is information about an exhabition on the horse in British History with a strong emphasis on Royal equine history. Couldn't see a mention of your Faberge figurine, but perhaps you could contact the organisers -details should be on the site - and they will be able to answer your question...

APRIL 26 - AUGUST 24, 2003

All the Queen's Horses: the Role of the Horse in British History will be one of the most ambitious exhibitions ever to come to the US from the United Kingdom. Featuring between 350 to 400 priceless works of art and artifacts, the exhibition will explore the rich equestrian heritage of England, Scotland, and Wales from approximately 500 BC to the present. Many of the pieces included in this world-exclusive exhibition have never been exhibited in America.

Three years in the making, the exhibition is being assembled from public and private collections throughout Britain including those of the British Museum, Royal Collections, British Library, Royal Mews, Royal Armouries Museums, Victoria and Albert Museum, Tate (Britain) Museum, Oxford's Ashmolean Museum, National Museums of Scotland, National Horseracing Museum, and the Museum of London. The value of artifacts and artwork is expected to approach $100,000,000.

Artifacts under consideration begin with the earliest known example of human art ever found in Britain - a flat bone with a detailed incised horse's head dating from 10,000 BC. Other artifacts currently under negotiations include a third century BC Scottish pony chanfron (head-armor); several gilded bronze Roman cavalry helmets with masks; one knight from the famous 12th century Lewis chessmen; Henry V's war saddle; Henry VIII's Burgundian horse armor, stirrups, and hawking glove; Elizabeth I's sidesaddle; the spurs of Charles I; miniature carriages of Queen Victoria's children, and various items from the current Royal Family.

All the Queen's Horses will also feature a stellar collection of approximately 40 paintings selected not only for their artistic merit, but also for their ability to enhance the exhibition's outstanding collection of artifacts. While negotiations continue, some of the artists expected to be represented include George Stubbs, J. F. Herring, Sr., H. B. Chalon, James Pollard, Sir Alfred Munnings and John Wooton.

One of the exhibition's highlights will be the complete reconstruction of an eighth century, Anglo-Saxon warrior and horse gravesite. The site was discovered near Cambridge in 1997. A fiberglass reproduction of the burial pit will be cast and, shortly before the exhibition opens, archaeologists will transport the actual skeletons and grave goods to the park where they will be placed into the pit as they were originally found.

The horse has been an integral part of the fabric of British history for more than two millennium. In 55 BC Celtic warriors used cavalry and horse-drawn chariots to oppose Caesar's invasion. As a result, horses were essential cargo for the successful second Roman invasion in 45 AD, and remained a critical element in Rome's four centuries of occupation. With the coming of the Viking raiders in the 7th century, horses were routinely stolen from local inhabitants, providing the marauders with the mobility necessary to seek their plunder.

Horses have played an important role in the English monarchy since the early Anglo-Saxon rulers. When William the Conqueror and his Norman knights invaded the island in 1066, their advanced cavalry techniques and larger horses won the day at Hastings. In the fourteenth century Edward III integrated mounted archers using the native longbow into his army, elevating the English to one of the most respected military forces in Europe. Henry VIII, an avid fan of the medieval tournament, imported heavier breeding stock from the continent in an effort to develop an English horse capable of carrying the heavy armor of the day - this despite the fact that the heavy warhorse had already become passй on the battlefield. Charles II was known to have raced against his courtiers in Newmarket, and established the Town Plate race which he won in 1671.

In England today, the Royal family remains intimately involved with horses. Queen Elizabeth II is still an avid rider and also maintains a stable of excellent Thoroughbred runners. Prince Phillip remains one of the leading carriage competitors in the world, while Princess Anne has represented her country as a member of the English three-day-event team.

Selected Artifacts

HONORARY CHAIRPERSONS
Governor Paul E. Patton
The Marquess of Tavistock
Sir Christopher Meyer, Her Majesty's Ambassador to the United States of America
William S. Farish, United States Ambassador to the Court of St. James's


Selected response from:

Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:52
Grading comment
Thank you very much. Certainly the main problem was the first part, but it's not helped by 'les' being 'wood' or 'forest'; my gut reaction was 'King of the Forests'.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
2 +5....King of the Forest
Libero_Lang_Lab
1 +1I forgot to add this comment to Dan:Diane Fontainebleau Pochй
1How/(Hough/Hou/ Houe/ Howe) the Wood King/ (Forest King)
Сергей Лузан


  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
How/(Hough/Hou/ Houe/ Howe) the Wood King/ (Forest King)


Explanation:
Try google. Good luck, John Sowerby!

Сергей Лузан
Russian Federation
Local time: 07:52
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 1276
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +5
....King of the Forest


Explanation:
Not sure about that first word, but I suspect that the rest of the name would be as above as it sounds more like the name of a horse...

Not much help.... but I did dig out this link which I think might lead you to the answer. It is from the International Museum of the Horse (oh yes, there is such a thing - in Kentucky):

http://www.imh.org/imh/imhmain.html


In particular there is information about an exhabition on the horse in British History with a strong emphasis on Royal equine history. Couldn't see a mention of your Faberge figurine, but perhaps you could contact the organisers -details should be on the site - and they will be able to answer your question...

APRIL 26 - AUGUST 24, 2003

All the Queen's Horses: the Role of the Horse in British History will be one of the most ambitious exhibitions ever to come to the US from the United Kingdom. Featuring between 350 to 400 priceless works of art and artifacts, the exhibition will explore the rich equestrian heritage of England, Scotland, and Wales from approximately 500 BC to the present. Many of the pieces included in this world-exclusive exhibition have never been exhibited in America.

Three years in the making, the exhibition is being assembled from public and private collections throughout Britain including those of the British Museum, Royal Collections, British Library, Royal Mews, Royal Armouries Museums, Victoria and Albert Museum, Tate (Britain) Museum, Oxford's Ashmolean Museum, National Museums of Scotland, National Horseracing Museum, and the Museum of London. The value of artifacts and artwork is expected to approach $100,000,000.

Artifacts under consideration begin with the earliest known example of human art ever found in Britain - a flat bone with a detailed incised horse's head dating from 10,000 BC. Other artifacts currently under negotiations include a third century BC Scottish pony chanfron (head-armor); several gilded bronze Roman cavalry helmets with masks; one knight from the famous 12th century Lewis chessmen; Henry V's war saddle; Henry VIII's Burgundian horse armor, stirrups, and hawking glove; Elizabeth I's sidesaddle; the spurs of Charles I; miniature carriages of Queen Victoria's children, and various items from the current Royal Family.

All the Queen's Horses will also feature a stellar collection of approximately 40 paintings selected not only for their artistic merit, but also for their ability to enhance the exhibition's outstanding collection of artifacts. While negotiations continue, some of the artists expected to be represented include George Stubbs, J. F. Herring, Sr., H. B. Chalon, James Pollard, Sir Alfred Munnings and John Wooton.

One of the exhibition's highlights will be the complete reconstruction of an eighth century, Anglo-Saxon warrior and horse gravesite. The site was discovered near Cambridge in 1997. A fiberglass reproduction of the burial pit will be cast and, shortly before the exhibition opens, archaeologists will transport the actual skeletons and grave goods to the park where they will be placed into the pit as they were originally found.

The horse has been an integral part of the fabric of British history for more than two millennium. In 55 BC Celtic warriors used cavalry and horse-drawn chariots to oppose Caesar's invasion. As a result, horses were essential cargo for the successful second Roman invasion in 45 AD, and remained a critical element in Rome's four centuries of occupation. With the coming of the Viking raiders in the 7th century, horses were routinely stolen from local inhabitants, providing the marauders with the mobility necessary to seek their plunder.

Horses have played an important role in the English monarchy since the early Anglo-Saxon rulers. When William the Conqueror and his Norman knights invaded the island in 1066, their advanced cavalry techniques and larger horses won the day at Hastings. In the fourteenth century Edward III integrated mounted archers using the native longbow into his army, elevating the English to one of the most respected military forces in Europe. Henry VIII, an avid fan of the medieval tournament, imported heavier breeding stock from the continent in an effort to develop an English horse capable of carrying the heavy armor of the day - this despite the fact that the heavy warhorse had already become passй on the battlefield. Charles II was known to have raced against his courtiers in Newmarket, and established the Town Plate race which he won in 1671.

In England today, the Royal family remains intimately involved with horses. Queen Elizabeth II is still an avid rider and also maintains a stable of excellent Thoroughbred runners. Prince Phillip remains one of the leading carriage competitors in the world, while Princess Anne has represented her country as a member of the English three-day-event team.

Selected Artifacts

HONORARY CHAIRPERSONS
Governor Paul E. Patton
The Marquess of Tavistock
Sir Christopher Meyer, Her Majesty's Ambassador to the United States of America
William S. Farish, United States Ambassador to the Court of St. James's




Libero_Lang_Lab
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:52
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1214
Grading comment
Thank you very much. Certainly the main problem was the first part, but it's not helped by 'les' being 'wood' or 'forest'; my gut reaction was 'King of the Forests'.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  GaryG: My guess for the 1st word is "Howe"
1 hr
  -> yeah, who knows... admittedly you get some strange equestrian monikers but that still sounds odd to me...

agree  xxxOleg Pashuk
11 hrs

agree  Diane Fontainebleau Pochй
16 hrs

agree  Rusinterp
1 day2 hrs

agree  Сергей Лузан
4 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
I forgot to add this comment to Dan:


Explanation:
I also think the first word is 'Howe'.
Howe was a contemporary of Edward VII, and, I found a pedigree 'Howe Tally Ho', 1890 at:



    Reference: http://www.pris.bc.ca/horses/cb/cbwebpgs/Pedigree.htm
Diane Fontainebleau Pochй
United States
Local time: 21:52
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Libero_Lang_Lab: that is good sleuth work - this suggests that the horse in question could have been from the same bloodline as tally ho
10 hrs
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