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жить-поживать и добра наживать

English translation: to live happily everafter

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19:42 Nov 5, 2007
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Russian term or phrase: жить-поживать и добра наживать
Any ideas for the English equivalent?
Emil Tubinshlak
Canada
Local time: 18:11
English translation:to live happily everafter
Explanation:
-

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Note added at 2 mins (2007-11-05 19:45:31 GMT)
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That's a common fair tale ending.

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Note added at 18 mins (2007-11-05 20:01:18 GMT)
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As danya correctly noted, it's "ever after" (with a space).
Selected response from:

Alexander Demyanov
Local time: 18:11
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +9to live happily everafterAlexander Demyanov
5 +1Live well and hoard wealth
Michael Kislov
4to live and prosper
Alex Koudlai


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Zhit' pozhivat' i dobra nazhivat'
Live well and hoard wealth


Explanation:
.

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Note added at 6 mins (2007-11-05 19:49:02 GMT)
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this would convey Russian specificity, the style of the original

Michael Kislov
Russian Federation
Local time: 01:11
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sofiya Skachko: I like when the original flavour is preserved
4 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
Zhit' pozhivat' i dobra nazhivat'
to live happily everafter


Explanation:
-

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 mins (2007-11-05 19:45:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

That's a common fair tale ending.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 mins (2007-11-05 20:01:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As danya correctly noted, it's "ever after" (with a space).

Alexander Demyanov
Local time: 18:11
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 112
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anna Makhorkina
1 min
  -> Thanks, Anna!

agree  erika rubinstein
2 mins
  -> Thanks, Erika!

agree  Amy Lesiewicz
4 mins
  -> Thanks, Amy!

agree  Olga Arakelyan
9 mins
  -> Thanks, Olga!

agree  Arkadi Burkov
9 mins
  -> Thanks, Arkadi!

agree  danya: ever_after 8))
12 mins
  -> Thanks, danya! Of course, it's "ever after"

agree  Andrey Belousov
14 mins
  -> Thanks, Andrey!

agree  Valery Kaminski
16 mins
  -> Thanks, Valery!

agree  The Misha
51 mins
  -> Thanks, The!

agree  Marina Mrouga: Choose the ending you like http://forum.wordreference.com/archive/index.php/t-353872.ht...
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Marina! An interesting forum too.

disagree  Alex Koudlai: the Russian phrase does not contain neither ever no after
17 hrs
  -> Thanks, Alex. The asker didn't ask for a word-to-word translation but rather for a functional equivalent of the expression.
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
to live and prosper


Explanation:
In the Russian phrase three ideas are expressed: 1) жить - to live (to stay alive); 2) поживать - to live day-by-day; 3) добра наживать - to accumulate wealth, to prosper. It seems that the English equivalent must reflect those three, be not too heavy, and be in use, as the Russian phrase itself.

Alex Koudlai
United States
Local time: 18:11
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 14
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
Non-PRO (1): Mark Berelekhis


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Changes made by editors
Nov 5, 2007 - Changes made by Natalie:
Term askedZhit\' pozhivat\' i dobra nazhivat\' » жить-поживать и добра наживать


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