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Бух

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19:52 Jun 19, 2017
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Russian term or phrase: Бух
From a book I am translating:

"...А до этого у них была нечаянная встреча в доме главного бухгалтера совхоза — Буха — как звали того в ауле."

I am thinking of the best way of conveying this diminutive, and the best I can think of is "Bean-counter". I am basically on the scrounge for other suggestions.

Thanks!
Simon Hollingsworth
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:56
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Summary of answers provided
3 +1booker
mk_lab
3 +1the Man/the Big Cheese himself/the Big Kahuna/the Head Honcho/Mr. Big Shot
Frank MacroJanus
3 +1Ledger
Mikhail Kropotov
3AccoRashid Lazytech
3Buchstermrrafe
3ChiefyEl oso
2BookieThe Misha


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
booker


Explanation:
"Бух" is simply reduced joky form of "бухгалтер". It seams that "booker" is the same for "bookkeeper"

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Note added at 22 mins (2017-06-19 20:14:40 GMT)
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Or even just "Book"

mk_lab
Ukraine
Local time: 09:56
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Nice idea, thank you


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  svetlana cosquéric: если следовать логике, то тогда "Book". Всё-таки из немецкого бухгалтер-то...
6 mins
  -> Спасибо
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Ledger


Explanation:
Maybe it's just me, but Ledger sounds like a real nickname.

Mikhail Kropotov
Russian Federation
Local time: 09:56
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 336

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  The Misha: This might work although I still have my doubts about the linguistic prowess of those Central Asian kolkhoznikies. Maybe it's because I have come across way too many of them myself back at the time.
2 hrs
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34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Chiefy


Explanation:
One possible way of conveying the diminutive ''Бух'' [Главбух] is by transforming the word "chief" into a diminutive, while omitting ''accountant'' altogether.


El oso
Russian Federation
PRO pts in category: 11
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
the Man/the Big Cheese himself/the Big Kahuna/the Head Honcho/Mr. Big Shot


Explanation:
I read this as an emphasis of the importance of the guy. You can pick the term that best suits the rest of the context.
cccccccccccccccccccc
"The Man" is a slang phrase that may refer to the government or to some other authority in a position of power. In addition to this derogatory connotation, it may also serve as a term of respect and praise.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man

Frank MacroJanus
United States
Local time: 02:56
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in category: 44

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mrrafe: The Man obviously can't be a name, but would be a funny alternative instead of a name. And yes, Big Kahuna is guaranteed funny (even in Hawaii?). Cf. J Mitchell, Big Enchilada ( https://dictionaryblog.cambridge.org/2013/01/28/words-of-wat... ).
9 mins
  -> Thank you, mrrafe. So, Mr. Hollingsworth now can localize the translation to any part of the world. The Big Shishka has a Russian flavor.

neutral  The Misha: I just don't see the peasants in a Central Asian village under the Soviets calling anyone Head Honcho or Big Cheese or Big Kahuna. Unless, of course, we are turning that village into Disneyland here, or the Sin City:)
1 hr
  -> I have no idea where and when this is taking place. This is why I provided several alternatives.
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52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Buchster


Explanation:
-ster is a mocking suffix for a surname in US EN. E.g., The Hilzster vs. the Trumpster. Evokes a state of being, and a hamster. Possibly from The Hulkster, for World Wrestling Federation champion Hulk Hogan.

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Note added at 57 mins (2017-06-19 20:49:31 GMT)
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http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/the-trumpster-mark-hamill-...

Also evokes Dumpster, trade name for a large trash bin. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dumpster

Cf. dumpster fire https://www.google.com/search?q=dumpster&oq=dumpster&aqs=chr...

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Note added at 1 hr (2017-06-19 21:34:06 GMT)
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-nik also is a humorous suffix calque, like "nudnik" in US EN from Russian Yiddish.

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Note added at 1 hr (2017-06-19 21:34:33 GMT)
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Thus, Buchnik.


    https://www.google.com/search?q=ster&oq=ster&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i65j0l4.1682j0j9&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
mrrafe
Local time: 02:56
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Bookie


Explanation:
I think the name should depend on whether you call the man's position chief bookkeeper or chief accountant. If he is a bookkeeper, than Bookie may work since it clearly carries across the origin of the nickname - something Buch or Buchster doesn't quite do, because really, home many of your readers do you expect to know German? (Well, maybe in Europe, but in the US it would be a lost cause. Unless good Ashkenazi Jewish folks from Brooklyn come to the rescue:)). That said, I am fully aware of the new connotations, totally absent from the original, that Bookie brings in. Still I think it is somewhat better and more fun than Booker here (Booker Prize, anyone)?

Now, if you call him an accountant, methink you could probably go with County - and yes, again, I am fully aware of the new can of worms I am opening here. I am just thinking out loud.

I don't like Bean Counter at all. It's perfectly fine for referring to someone in the 3rd person, but as a nickname it's way too long, and it's probably what everybody and his brother would expect you to call the guy, which kind of makes it a cliche. And where's the fun in that?

The Misha
Local time: 02:56
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 76

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  mrrafe: See the link to the original, in the Discussion Entries. I think we all were headed down the wrong path. The original is a parable including a literate woman who happens to be an accountant. What drives the narrative is her books, not her accountancy.
4 hrs
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18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Acco


Explanation:
accountant

Rashid Lazytech
Local time: 11:56
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
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