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ne pro vashu chest'

English translation: Not for the likes of you!

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Russian term or phrase:ne pro vashu chest'
English translation:Not for the likes of you!
Entered by: Jack Doughty
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14:58 Mar 29, 2004
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Russian term or phrase: ne pro vashu chest'
novel circa 1900.
Context:
A gang of robbers stop a wagon.
They ask: Den'gi est'?
Someone replies from inside the wagon: Est', da ne pro vashu chest'!
Emily Justice
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:02
Not for the likes of you!
Explanation:
This might be a suitably contemptuous expression.
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:02
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone. Jack's suggestion is perfect for my purposes.
A particular thanks to Kirill as well for pointing out the rhyme and explaining the way in which the expressions is used.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1Not for the likes of you!
Jack Doughty
4 +1Naught to do with you!
shlepakoff
4Few, but not for you!
Sergei Tumanov
4but none for youbeserg
3 +1not for you, not for people like you, you do not deserve it
Kirill Semenov


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Naught to do with you!


Explanation:
"Naught to do with you!" is a 'period' way of saying "None of your business" (just like "ne pro vashu chest'" has long been replaced with "ne tvoye delo")

shlepakoff
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marcus Malabad: you mean 'obsolete' way of saying...
4 mins
  -> Thanks Marcus. "Obsolete" to the modern ear and eye, yes, but "period" to someone trying to reconstruct the speech of 1900's (a specific period in point).

neutral  Sergei Tumanov: "не твое дело" и "не про твою честь" обозначают разные вещи
2 hrs
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
not for you, not for people like you, you do not deserve it


Explanation:
That is the literal meaning: "not for people of your rank". But in fact, this is a popular (and quite an old-fashioned) rhymed and mocking refusal to give something: "Do you have ...?" -- "Yes, I do, but not for you", something like that.

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 23:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 381

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sergei Tumanov: раньше в России существовало обращение "Ваша честь"что-то типа "Your honour" Фраза буквально значит "Деньги есть, но не для вас, Ваша честь!" с юмором указывая на неуважение к собеседнику, "Есть, но не дам"
2 hrs
  -> here "честь" may imply initially a social status. The meaning is "you do not have the rights of those who might lawfully ask/demand for this"
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
but none for you


Explanation:
an option

beserg
Local time: 23:02
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Not for the likes of you!


Explanation:
This might be a suitably contemptuous expression.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 605
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone. Jack's suggestion is perfect for my purposes.
A particular thanks to Kirill as well for pointing out the rhyme and explaining the way in which the expressions is used.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Knowles: I think this would have the right period flavour as well.
55 mins
  -> Yes. Not quite as old-fashioned as "naught", but it sounds suitable for the 19th century.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Few, but not for you!


Explanation:
Do you have roubles?
I have few, but not for you!

с некоторой натяжкой мне кажется подойдет! :-)

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Note added at 2004-03-29 19:40:18 (GMT) Post-grading
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2 kirill - как и все выражения такого рода они в просторечии давно уже значат чтото совсем другое .

например \"мамзель\" - из той же оперы.
так и \"про вашу честь.\" в поезде едут сибирские рудничные мужики - они выражаются как устоялось. я для аскера пытаюсь прояснить откуда фраза произошла. а перевод пусть сама ищет


Sergei Tumanov
Local time: 23:02
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 12
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