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...liubuiu Katiukhu vybirai!...Ya, bratsy-razboinichki, srazu trekh zakhorovozhu

English translation: -

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Russian term or phrase:...liubuiu Katiukhu vybirai!...Ya, bratsy-razboinichki, srazu trekh zakhorovozhu
English translation:-
Entered by: Natalie
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20:45 Mar 30, 2004
Russian to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Russian term or phrase: ...liubuiu Katiukhu vybirai!...Ya, bratsy-razboinichki, srazu trekh zakhorovozhu
Novel circa 1900.
A former convict is talking about how his new life will be (I think - possibly he is talking about his former life..I can't be sure until I know the answer to my question).

Is Katiukha a diminuitive of Ekaterina?
Does this particular name signify anything in particular?
And finally, is the next sentence related to these Katiukhas? Is he talking about three 'Katiukhas'?
Emily Justice
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:24
You can choose any woman you like....Boys,I'll take three of them at once....
Explanation:
This is really Russian name.But it has the suffix from Kate(the full name Ekaterina)-iukha- it is something between scornful and diminutive, may be "cool"- in contemporary meaning.I agree with Galina that he didn't mean anybody in particular- just any possible woman(liubuiu).Then-he said to his mates(accurate translation will be: brothers-bandits, but I dont think you should put it this way)- just-boys or men.The reason is that the word "bandits"goes with another suffix, in Russian it has diminutive meaning "chek or pl-chki", so it can be his friends/mates. But the last word didn't mean something bad.In Russian villages "zakhorovodit devushku or zenshinu" meant - to make her be attracted to you,pay attention,even fall in love. "Chorovod" is the old Russian game/dance,when young people went around the circle and while doing it-could choose and came close to person they like.It is close to "turn smb.'s head"-I even wanted to write it but wasn't sure about "three heads at once".In Russian- you can say-"vskruzit golovu srazu 3 zenshinam". I know that it is possible here( in real life)-but what about the phrase?You should know better.
Selected response from:

Ann Nosova
United States
Local time: 12:24
Grading comment
Thanks for all answers. Most helpful. Anna your answer was very interesting. I really like this idea of 'turning heads'. I am going with something like 'I'll turn the heads of three at once". ('of' 3 women ).

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1Yes, Katyukha is derived form Ekaterina, but not diminutive,
Sergey Strakhov
4You can choose any woman you like....Boys,I'll take three of them at once....
Ann Nosova
4Katiukha is a very common Russian name
Galina Blankenship


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Yes, Katyukha is derived form Ekaterina, but not diminutive,


Explanation:
rather familiar, without any ceremony

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Note added at 6 mins (2004-03-30 20:52:03 GMT)
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No, he doesn\"t mean that he is able to pick up three \"Katyukhas\" at one time: just three girls at once, not necessarily Ekaterina by name:)

Sergey Strakhov
Local time: 18:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in category: 22

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Сергей Лузан
22 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Katiukha is a very common Russian name


Explanation:
So probably by "Katiuha" he simply means a woman, any woman. If he talks about his new life then he probably talks about some ideal life when he can pick up any woman he wants. Moreover, he can pick up/do/have three women at once...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 37 mins (2004-03-30 23:22:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ЗАХОРОВОДИТЬ - Принять в преступную группу; заманить в притон; увлечь.
http://www.bratok.com/dictionary/dict_09.html

... по музыке, говорить байковым языком; подначить,
захороводить, подкупить прислугу ...
http://psyonline.ru/info/?tree_id=11&qid=2163

Galina Blankenship
United States
Local time: 09:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ann Nosova: Галя,это же 1900,тогда еще небыло "братков" и их жаргона,не было преступных групп(в современном понятии); нет,я не могу согласиться с этим толкованием "захороводить"(см.ответ)
6 hrs
  -> я думаю, что это одно из тех "старородных" слов, которое как-то прижилось в современном жаргоне: нельзя отрицать связь слов во времени, особенно принадлежащих к одному тому же "разбойничему" миру. Опять-таки "захороводить" подразумевает "увлечь, заманить"
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
You can choose any woman you like....Boys,I'll take three of them at once....


Explanation:
This is really Russian name.But it has the suffix from Kate(the full name Ekaterina)-iukha- it is something between scornful and diminutive, may be "cool"- in contemporary meaning.I agree with Galina that he didn't mean anybody in particular- just any possible woman(liubuiu).Then-he said to his mates(accurate translation will be: brothers-bandits, but I dont think you should put it this way)- just-boys or men.The reason is that the word "bandits"goes with another suffix, in Russian it has diminutive meaning "chek or pl-chki", so it can be his friends/mates. But the last word didn't mean something bad.In Russian villages "zakhorovodit devushku or zenshinu" meant - to make her be attracted to you,pay attention,even fall in love. "Chorovod" is the old Russian game/dance,when young people went around the circle and while doing it-could choose and came close to person they like.It is close to "turn smb.'s head"-I even wanted to write it but wasn't sure about "three heads at once".In Russian- you can say-"vskruzit golovu srazu 3 zenshinam". I know that it is possible here( in real life)-but what about the phrase?You should know better.

Ann Nosova
United States
Local time: 12:24
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
Grading comment
Thanks for all answers. Most helpful. Anna your answer was very interesting. I really like this idea of 'turning heads'. I am going with something like 'I'll turn the heads of three at once". ('of' 3 women ).
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Changes made by editors
Aug 15, 2005 - Changes made by Natalie:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


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