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горько

English translation: Нет такого обычая больше нигде (см.)

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12:44 Aug 4, 2004
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Russian term or phrase: горько
Горько! Горько! Горько! (на фоне продолжительного поцелуя :) - то, которое кричат на свадьбе.
1. Как бы вы перевели?
2. Есть ли в каких-то странах аналогичная традиция?
Neon
English translation:Нет такого обычая больше нигде (см.)
Explanation:
Обычай , связанный с поцелуями, я нашел только в Венгрии (см. чуть ниже)
Придется перевести : Например, "Gorko!"-Wedding Kisses or "Sweetener Kisses" или что-нибудь еще в таком роде

Вот тут описание нашей традиции на аглицком:

http://www.womenrussia.com/wedding1.htm
Here we come close to the most popular and prominent Russian wedding tradition. For the first toast people usually drink Champagne, and after the first sip somebody says "Gor'ko!" ("Bitter!"); it means the vine is bitter. All guests together start to shout "Gor'ko! Gor'ko!" To make the vine sweet, the newlywed couple must kiss each other. They must stand up and kiss each other for as long as possible, and all the guests start counting "1, 2, 3, 4 , 5..." while they are kissing. If the couple was not kissing long enough, the guests can insist that the vine is still bitter, and request another kiss. This happens after almost every following toast, so the couple has lots of kissing during the wedding.

The second toast is always for the parents; and after a witness announced the toast, the bride and the groom have their say of "Thank you" to both bride's and groom's parents. (With another "Gor'ko!" and kissing afterwards.)

А вот тут подборка свадебных обычаев разных стран. Дабы избежать праведного гнева модераторов, привожу в сокращении, но рекомендую заглянуть по ссылочке

Africa / African American:

Jumping the Broom: In the times of slavery in this country, African American couples were not allowed to formally marry and live together. To make a public declaration of their love and commitment, a man and woman jumped over a broom into matrimony, to the beat of drums. ( The broom has long held significant meaning for the various Africans, symbolizing the start of homemaking for the newlywed couple. In Southern Africa, the day after the wedding, a kgatla bird assisted the other women in the family in sweeping the courtyard, indicating her dutiful willingness to help her in-laws with housework till the newlyweds could move to their new home.) Some African- American couples today are choosing to include this symbolic rite in their wedding ceremony, directly before the recession.
Cowrie Shells- Smooth cowrie shells, which encourage fertility, are worn in bridal necklaces used to trim gowns, jackets, and headpieces in silver and white- as decorative accents. Cowrie shells, found of the coast of West Africa, were once used as money and today are used for purification. The shell is also used for purification. The shell is also a symbol of beauty and power.
China:

Chinese brides receive pocketbooks filled with gold jewelry from female relatives, which bestows status on the bride.
In old China, the color of love and joy is red, which is the favorite color choice for the bride's dress, candles, gift boxes, and the money envelopes that are presented to the bride and guests.

England:

Traditionally, the village bride and her wedding party always walk together to the church. Leading the procession: a small girl strewing blossoms along the road, so the bride's path through life will always be happy and laden with flowers.
Brides sew a good luck charm, such as the silver horseshoe worn by royal British brides, to the hem of their wedding gown.

France:

During the rein of LousXVI, the bride gave her bridesmaids her fans, decorated with mythological paintings, as wedding presents.
Many couples drink the reception toast from an engraved two-handled cup (the coupe de mariage) as did newlyweds from days past. This cup will be passed on to future generations.

Germany:

To mark their bethrothal, a couple give eachother gold bands, worn on their left hands. Throughout their engagement, the couple are referred to as bride and bridegroom.
During the ceremony, when the couple kneel, the groom may kneel on the bride's hem to show that he'll keep her in line. The bride may step on his foot when she rises, to reassert herself.
Hungary:

The couple exchange betrothal rings. The groom also gives the bride a bag of coins: the bride gives the groom either three or seven handkerchiefs (believed to be a lucky number).
Guests dance with the bride at the reception, and give her a few pence in exchange for a kiss.


Ireland:

The traditional wedding cake of the Emerald Isle is a rich fruitcake. In true Irish spirit, the recipe is laced with brandy or bourbon.
A lucky horseshoe is given to the bride and groom to keep in their home.

Japan:

On her wedding day , the bride and her family visit the groom's house. Traditionally, she wears a triangular band on her head, known as the tsunokakushi, or horn cover, to hide the horns of jealousy, which supposedly all women posses.

Russia:

Wedding guests don't only give presents-they get them! The bride gives friends and relatives favors of sweets. They give her money after the wedding.
After the couple are crowned in a Russian Orthodox ceremony, they race to stand on a white rug. It is believed that whoever steps on it first will be the master of the household.

Scotland:

Friends carry on an old good-natured custom: they wash the feet of both the bride and groom, preparing them to set off on a new path.
The sword dance, similar to an Irish jig or a Highland fling, is usually performed at a Scottish wedding gathering.


Ukraine:

A mock capture of the bride is carried out at wedding receptions to remind everyone present of the many times their homeland was invaded.
Instead of cake, Ukranian couples share korovai, a sacred wedding bread decorated with symbolic motifs that represent eternity and the joining together of two families.

Wales:

Here, and throughout the British Isles, the bride gives her attendants cuttings of myrtle (symbolizing love) for her bouquet. According to custom, if the plant roots and blossoms, they will marry soon.
Attendants race home form the ceremony with news of the marriage; first to arrive wins a pint of ale.

Selected response from:

Sergey Strakhov
Local time: 06:58
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +6Нет такого обычая больше нигде (см.)
Sergey Strakhov
4 +3In US I don't think there is a word for it (more)IrinaGM
3Same in BulgariaYoana Yotova


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
горько
In US I don't think there is a word for it (more)


Explanation:
people just tap the wineglass with a spoon or the fork until the groom kisses the bride

IrinaGM
United States
Local time: 00:58
Native speaker of: Native in GeorgianGeorgian
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxkire: exactly
4 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Andrey Belousov
4 hrs
  -> Thank you Andrey

agree  Alexander Onishko
2 days35 mins
  -> Spasibo Alexander
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
горько
Нет такого обычая больше нигде (см.)


Explanation:
Обычай , связанный с поцелуями, я нашел только в Венгрии (см. чуть ниже)
Придется перевести : Например, "Gorko!"-Wedding Kisses or "Sweetener Kisses" или что-нибудь еще в таком роде

Вот тут описание нашей традиции на аглицком:

http://www.womenrussia.com/wedding1.htm
Here we come close to the most popular and prominent Russian wedding tradition. For the first toast people usually drink Champagne, and after the first sip somebody says "Gor'ko!" ("Bitter!"); it means the vine is bitter. All guests together start to shout "Gor'ko! Gor'ko!" To make the vine sweet, the newlywed couple must kiss each other. They must stand up and kiss each other for as long as possible, and all the guests start counting "1, 2, 3, 4 , 5..." while they are kissing. If the couple was not kissing long enough, the guests can insist that the vine is still bitter, and request another kiss. This happens after almost every following toast, so the couple has lots of kissing during the wedding.

The second toast is always for the parents; and after a witness announced the toast, the bride and the groom have their say of "Thank you" to both bride's and groom's parents. (With another "Gor'ko!" and kissing afterwards.)

А вот тут подборка свадебных обычаев разных стран. Дабы избежать праведного гнева модераторов, привожу в сокращении, но рекомендую заглянуть по ссылочке

Africa / African American:

Jumping the Broom: In the times of slavery in this country, African American couples were not allowed to formally marry and live together. To make a public declaration of their love and commitment, a man and woman jumped over a broom into matrimony, to the beat of drums. ( The broom has long held significant meaning for the various Africans, symbolizing the start of homemaking for the newlywed couple. In Southern Africa, the day after the wedding, a kgatla bird assisted the other women in the family in sweeping the courtyard, indicating her dutiful willingness to help her in-laws with housework till the newlyweds could move to their new home.) Some African- American couples today are choosing to include this symbolic rite in their wedding ceremony, directly before the recession.
Cowrie Shells- Smooth cowrie shells, which encourage fertility, are worn in bridal necklaces used to trim gowns, jackets, and headpieces in silver and white- as decorative accents. Cowrie shells, found of the coast of West Africa, were once used as money and today are used for purification. The shell is also used for purification. The shell is also a symbol of beauty and power.
China:

Chinese brides receive pocketbooks filled with gold jewelry from female relatives, which bestows status on the bride.
In old China, the color of love and joy is red, which is the favorite color choice for the bride's dress, candles, gift boxes, and the money envelopes that are presented to the bride and guests.

England:

Traditionally, the village bride and her wedding party always walk together to the church. Leading the procession: a small girl strewing blossoms along the road, so the bride's path through life will always be happy and laden with flowers.
Brides sew a good luck charm, such as the silver horseshoe worn by royal British brides, to the hem of their wedding gown.

France:

During the rein of LousXVI, the bride gave her bridesmaids her fans, decorated with mythological paintings, as wedding presents.
Many couples drink the reception toast from an engraved two-handled cup (the coupe de mariage) as did newlyweds from days past. This cup will be passed on to future generations.

Germany:

To mark their bethrothal, a couple give eachother gold bands, worn on their left hands. Throughout their engagement, the couple are referred to as bride and bridegroom.
During the ceremony, when the couple kneel, the groom may kneel on the bride's hem to show that he'll keep her in line. The bride may step on his foot when she rises, to reassert herself.
Hungary:

The couple exchange betrothal rings. The groom also gives the bride a bag of coins: the bride gives the groom either three or seven handkerchiefs (believed to be a lucky number).
Guests dance with the bride at the reception, and give her a few pence in exchange for a kiss.


Ireland:

The traditional wedding cake of the Emerald Isle is a rich fruitcake. In true Irish spirit, the recipe is laced with brandy or bourbon.
A lucky horseshoe is given to the bride and groom to keep in their home.

Japan:

On her wedding day , the bride and her family visit the groom's house. Traditionally, she wears a triangular band on her head, known as the tsunokakushi, or horn cover, to hide the horns of jealousy, which supposedly all women posses.

Russia:

Wedding guests don't only give presents-they get them! The bride gives friends and relatives favors of sweets. They give her money after the wedding.
After the couple are crowned in a Russian Orthodox ceremony, they race to stand on a white rug. It is believed that whoever steps on it first will be the master of the household.

Scotland:

Friends carry on an old good-natured custom: they wash the feet of both the bride and groom, preparing them to set off on a new path.
The sword dance, similar to an Irish jig or a Highland fling, is usually performed at a Scottish wedding gathering.


Ukraine:

A mock capture of the bride is carried out at wedding receptions to remind everyone present of the many times their homeland was invaded.
Instead of cake, Ukranian couples share korovai, a sacred wedding bread decorated with symbolic motifs that represent eternity and the joining together of two families.

Wales:

Here, and throughout the British Isles, the bride gives her attendants cuttings of myrtle (symbolizing love) for her bouquet. According to custom, if the plant roots and blossoms, they will marry soon.
Attendants race home form the ceremony with news of the marriage; first to arrive wins a pint of ale.




    Reference: http://www.google.de/search?hl=de&ie=UTF-8&q=%22For+the+newl...
Sergey Strakhov
Local time: 06:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in category: 22
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yelena.
1 hr
  -> :-)

agree  mk_lab
2 hrs
  -> :-)

agree  David Knowles
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, David:)

agree  Kurt Porter: I'd just interpret/translate "Kiss! Kiss! Kiss." This is truly one of the occassions where the concept has to be translated, vice the word.
3 hrs
  -> Agree with you, Kurt! A propos, "Kiss! Kiss! Kiss" is used in Russian as well: to call a cat:))

agree  xxxkire: + as Irina said, in the US they tap wine glasses
4 hrs

agree  Vladimir Dubisskiy: with putting Gor'ko (Bitter) with further explanation if required. But 'it's 'kis-kis-kis' (one 's') for the cat :-))
6 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
горько
Same in Bulgaria


Explanation:
The tradition exists also in Bulgaria. It may happen a lot of times during one wedding:) The idea is that the first kisses as husband and wife a very sweet and because so much sweet is not good people shout "Горчиво" (bitter) - same word but in Bulgarian any time the two start to kiss... Or when they decide that it is time the new husband and wife to kiss each other :)

I would leave it "Gorko" and would add an explanation in brackets or under the text what it is.

Yoana Yotova
Local time: 07:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in BulgarianBulgarian
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