KudoZ home » Russian to English » Poetry & Literature

Kut'ia

English translation: here it's metonymy

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
17:49 Dec 3, 2004
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Russian term or phrase: Kut'ia
Ugrium Reka

Kut'ia, obmanshchik!
Emily Justice
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:24
English translation:here it's metonymy
Explanation:
here "kutja" is used as metonymy (a figure of speech in which an attribute is substituted for the whole)

A parish priest is associated with the "church" ritual food used on some (rare) occasions, and this goes like as an 'ad hoc' nickname. You may consider changing it for another term that would be more clear for the English reader, without delving too deep in explanation of the old customs, like, for example, "hey you, church bells", or "you church candles", or such.
Selected response from:

Alya
Russian Federation
Local time: 23:24
Grading comment
Thanks, and sorry I didn't provide more context.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +5here it's metonymy
Alya
4Here: sin-hound or holy JoexxxIreneN
41. Boiled rice or 2. doggy
Levan Namoradze


Discussion entries: 9





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
1. Boiled rice or 2. doggy


Explanation:
Since there is no additional context, please see two versions:
1. boiled rice with raising and honey (каша, которую едят на поминках);
2. doggy - a pet name, i.e. the Slavs use to call a dog "кутья".

Levan Namoradze
Georgia
Local time: 00:24
Native speaker of: Native in GeorgianGeorgian
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Here: sin-hound or holy Joe


Explanation:
Based on colleagues' research and the context, it's like calling a doctor 'a clyster'. I guess we need to find some trade attribute or word in English used to mock or offend clergymen.

I propose 2 options, both of which have nothing to do with the direct translation already stated by Kirill.

xxxIreneN
United States
Local time: 15:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 52
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
here it's metonymy


Explanation:
here "kutja" is used as metonymy (a figure of speech in which an attribute is substituted for the whole)

A parish priest is associated with the "church" ritual food used on some (rare) occasions, and this goes like as an 'ad hoc' nickname. You may consider changing it for another term that would be more clear for the English reader, without delving too deep in explanation of the old customs, like, for example, "hey you, church bells", or "you church candles", or such.

Alya
Russian Federation
Local time: 23:24
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
Thanks, and sorry I didn't provide more context.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  recobra: OK, church candle or church rat
34 mins
  -> спасибо :)

agree  nekogda
1 hr

agree  Anatoliy Babich
13 hrs

agree  Vassyl Trylis: you, beard... (not You, Alya!)
17 hrs

agree  xxxIreneN
2 days12 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search