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bajada

English translation: subhead

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:bajada
English translation:subhead
Entered by: xxxtazdog
Options:
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08:57 Jun 23, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Advertising / Public Relations / Brand identity
Spanish term or phrase: bajada
The problem as I see it is that they are inventing this term, so how can I translate it? Any ideas out there?

neilmac
Spain
Local time: 19:59
subhead
Explanation:
They didn’t make it up. It’s used in journalism, although from what I could see, it comes up more in texts from Argentina, so I don't know if it's a local meaning or not.

Bajada: frases que completan la idea del título y que se ubica por debajo de él.
http://www.rrppnet.com.ar/diccionario.htm

1. Titulo principal.
2. Volanta o antetítulo.
3. Bajada o subtítulo.
4. Copete o lead
http://www.rrppnet.com.ar/mediosgraficos.htm

sub•head
n. In both senses also called subheading.
1. The heading or title of a subdivision of a printed subject.
2. A subordinate heading or title.
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=subhead

The online magazine Salon not only employed the headline "Starr Wars" but also added a ***subordinate headline (a "subhead" or "subhed," in parlance).***
http://www.mcsweeneys.net/1998/12/01headlines.html

And here’s a text using subhead in your type of context, i.e., in a brochure.

Subhead: The function of a good subhead is to create a transition between the headline and the body of the text. Check newspaper stories. You have an attention grabbing headline, then some smaller text with more "teaser text" to lead you into the main text of the story. Your ads and brochures should use the same techniques. Don't have a headline, then an illustration, then body text, without some sub text to gently lead the reader.
http://www.smalltownmarketing.com/adsthatsell.html

Also see previous Kudoz question: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/495989
Selected response from:

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 19:59
Grading comment
The best by far - useful links too. Cheers Cindy :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1subheadxxxtazdog
4loss of market sharejeff robson
4downturn
David Hollywood
3downstreamGabo Pena


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
downturn


Explanation:
:)

David Hollywood
Local time: 14:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 43
Grading comment
I'm afraid you've got the wrong end of the stick this time, thanks anyway
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer
Comment: I'm afraid you've got the wrong end of the stick this time, thanks anyway

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
loss of market share


Explanation:
downturn is good too. this might be more appropriate for describing a specific product or company. also colloquial "is in a rut", or, more economically based "report a loss".

jeff robson
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
subhead


Explanation:
They didn’t make it up. It’s used in journalism, although from what I could see, it comes up more in texts from Argentina, so I don't know if it's a local meaning or not.

Bajada: frases que completan la idea del título y que se ubica por debajo de él.
http://www.rrppnet.com.ar/diccionario.htm

1. Titulo principal.
2. Volanta o antetítulo.
3. Bajada o subtítulo.
4. Copete o lead
http://www.rrppnet.com.ar/mediosgraficos.htm

sub•head
n. In both senses also called subheading.
1. The heading or title of a subdivision of a printed subject.
2. A subordinate heading or title.
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=subhead

The online magazine Salon not only employed the headline "Starr Wars" but also added a ***subordinate headline (a "subhead" or "subhed," in parlance).***
http://www.mcsweeneys.net/1998/12/01headlines.html

And here’s a text using subhead in your type of context, i.e., in a brochure.

Subhead: The function of a good subhead is to create a transition between the headline and the body of the text. Check newspaper stories. You have an attention grabbing headline, then some smaller text with more "teaser text" to lead you into the main text of the story. Your ads and brochures should use the same techniques. Don't have a headline, then an illustration, then body text, without some sub text to gently lead the reader.
http://www.smalltownmarketing.com/adsthatsell.html

Also see previous Kudoz question: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/495989

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 19:59
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 114
Grading comment
The best by far - useful links too. Cheers Cindy :-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marina Soldati
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
downstream


Explanation:
/

Gabo Pena
Local time: 10:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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