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ATERRIZAR

English translation: "About to" and "ready to"

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:ATERRIZAR
English translation:"About to" and "ready to"
Entered by: Edward Tully
Options:
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10:21 Feb 4, 2009
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Aerospace / Aviation / Space
Spanish term or phrase: ATERRIZAR
What is the difference between
"El avión está por aterrizar"
y
"El avión está para aterrizar"
?
Many thanks.
Daniel Armand
"About to" and "ready to"
Explanation:
the difference is that the first refers to time and the second to having everything in position etc...a small difference, but it does exist!
http://209.85.229.132/search?q=cache:hmkyHnmx4jYJ:forum.word...|lang_en

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Note added at 6 hrs (2009-02-04 17:16:56 GMT)
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it should be said, as per Jairo's comments, that this structure is rarely used...I can't remember the last time I heard it, but it does officially exist, although nowadays people would be more likely to use "preparado", "listo", "en condicones" etc.
Selected response from:

Edward Tully
Local time: 03:54
Grading comment
Thanks to Edward Tully for clarifying this point.
Daniel
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3"About to" and "ready to"
Edward Tully
4 +1to land
David Russi
4to touch land
Carmen Schultz


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
to touch land


Explanation:
another option if you need to use variety in the text (other than 'to land')

Carmen Schultz
Local time: 20:54
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
aterrizar
to land


Explanation:
El avión está por aterrizar > the airplane is about to land
El avión está para aterrizar > this is incorrect Spanish, it would imply that it it there in order to land, but you would not say this.

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Note added at 2 hrs (2009-02-04 12:34:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here is an explanation of "el tren está por/para salir"

I guess using the same logic you cold envision a pilot saying this, but I don't see it too likely... more likely: "estamos listos para aterrizar".



http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=174838



David Russi
United States
Local time: 19:54
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jairo Payan: Coincido, el avión está para aterrizar no es español, así como tampoco lo es "el tren está para salir"
3 hrs
  -> I think these are study examples to try and teach the difference between por and para. Unfortunately, sometimes these examples stretch the limits of verisimilitude...
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
"About to" and "ready to"


Explanation:
the difference is that the first refers to time and the second to having everything in position etc...a small difference, but it does exist!
http://209.85.229.132/search?q=cache:hmkyHnmx4jYJ:forum.word...|lang_en

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2009-02-04 17:16:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

it should be said, as per Jairo's comments, that this structure is rarely used...I can't remember the last time I heard it, but it does officially exist, although nowadays people would be more likely to use "preparado", "listo", "en condicones" etc.

Edward Tully
Local time: 03:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Thanks to Edward Tully for clarifying this point.
Daniel

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  margaret caulfield: Yep!
58 mins
  -> thank you Margaret! ;-)

agree  Carmen Schultz
2 hrs
  -> thank you Carmen! ;-)

agree  PeterIII
4 hrs
  -> thank you Peter! ;-)

neutral  Jairo Payan: Con tu venia, la expresíon "el avión está para aterrizar" debe ser un regionalismo y mal empleado entre otras cosas. La expresión simplemente no existe en español. Si todo está en posición, los aviadores no decimos "el avión está para aterrizar". Saludoss
4 hrs
  -> Well, it does exist...thank you anyway Jairo! ;-)
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Changes made by editors
Feb 9, 2009 - Changes made by Edward Tully:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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