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Cara de leoparda, Cara de hiena.

English translation: Talking about culture, it does not apply. But Spanish poetic

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08:39 May 10, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary / Drama Spain 1930's
Spanish term or phrase: Cara de leoparda, Cara de hiena.
Symbolic. I am trying to find out any symbolism for the animals in Spanish culture, especially during the 1930's.
justJack
English translation:Talking about culture, it does not apply. But Spanish poetic
Explanation:
metre requires, for a full rhyme, that both vowel AND consonant endings have the same sound. Hence:
"Bernarda/leoparda" qualifies as a full rhyme, as does "Magdalena/hiena".

A half-rhyming poem would only require the vowel ending.
Selected response from:

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 17:48
Grading comment
Thanks a lot for the info.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3"Leopard's Face, Hyena's Face"
Massimo Gaido
4 +1Talking about culture, it does not apply. But Spanish poetic
Parrot
4 +1Advice
Gustavo Garrido


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
"Leopard's Face, Hyena's Face"


Explanation:
I am sure you know it, but this is from Garcia Lorca. "La Casa de Bernada Alba".
""Ovejita, niño mio,
vámonos a la orilla del mar.
La hormiguita estará en su puerta,
Yo te daré la teta y el pan.
Bernada, cara de leoparda.
Magdalena, cara de hiena.
Ovejita.
Meee, meee
Vamos a los ramos del potral de Bel1n."

See site.

"Leopard's Face, Hyena's Face"

Ciao,
M.


    Reference: http://members.aol.com/navegadora/web_quest_lorca/federico_g...
Massimo Gaido
United States
Local time: 10:48
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 226

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Worklog: Bello Massimo, :-)
5 mins
  -> Grazie bellissima......{inchino}

agree  CNF: and you can find a good explanation (with spelling mistakes, though) to the leoparda and hiena metaphors here: http://www.purgatory.org/written/spanish/s-450.html
5 hrs

agree  xxxOso: ¶:^)
6 hrs
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Advice


Explanation:
The expression "with a face like a..." is followed by whatever animal you like, its a sort of joker of the English language. (1460 matches in Yahoo)
leoparda
m leopard; leopardo hembra leopardess


hiena:
f hyena

Good luck

Gustavo Garrido
Argentina
Local time: 12:48
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in pair: 139

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr. Chrys Chrystello
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Talking about culture, it does not apply. But Spanish poetic


Explanation:
metre requires, for a full rhyme, that both vowel AND consonant endings have the same sound. Hence:
"Bernarda/leoparda" qualifies as a full rhyme, as does "Magdalena/hiena".

A half-rhyming poem would only require the vowel ending.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 17:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7645
Grading comment
Thanks a lot for the info.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  CNF: vale aclarar que la rima se considera desde la última vocal acentuada. Mil gracias por tu explicación, me estaba preguntando últimamente cómo se diría rima consonante y asonante en inglés, y ahora justo vos me lo aclaraste con tu aporte. Thanks again! ;^)
3 hrs
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