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tunas/panteones

English translation: There are "tunas" and then there are "nopales". Panteon is cementery.

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10:46 Oct 23, 2002
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Spanish term or phrase: tunas/panteones
Hola gente!

Espero que esteis todos bien. Una vez más solicito vuestro buen hacer para echarme una manita con estos términos porque estoy un poco perdida. Es de un texto escrito por un mejicano y el contexto exacto es: "recuerdo que mi abuelo aunque ya estaba muy viejo siempre andaba vendiendo tunas por las esquinas de los panteones".

La cosa es que no sé muy bien el significado de estas palabras en castellano, lo que me hace imposible pasarlas al inglés.

Muchas gracias de antemano porñ la ayuda.

Saludos,

E.
Elena Vazquez Fernandez
Spain
Local time: 18:52
English translation:There are "tunas" and then there are "nopales". Panteon is cementery.
Explanation:
I have to comment on this 'cause I have a lot of "tunas" prickly pears in my fridge at the moment. You slice off skin and eat flesh and seeds - just swallow them right down! They are delicious and sweet, excellent cold; everyone loves them! They grow on top of the main part of the cactus and could be considered the fruity part.
However, I have no "nopales" which, according to Simon&Schuster's International Spanish Dictionary, is also prickly pear. One of these terms is wrong, because they are definitely two different things. Nopales are the equivalent of cactus rubbery "leaves" which are scraped, boiled and later chopped up to mix into scrambled eggs with tomato, onion and garlic, tacos, etc. They are said to be good for lowering blood pressure and about anything else that ails you. That said, they take a bit of getting used to, as they are rather tough and release an oozing liquid - that's why you boil them, to get rid of the ooze. Is this more than you wanted to know about tunas?
Selected response from:

Jan Castillo
Local time: 13:52
Grading comment
Muchas gracias a todos por la ayuda :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2There are "tunas" and then there are "nopales". Panteon is cementery.Jan Castillo
5 +2Tunas/tunas, panteones/cementeriosMagda Miño
5 +1prickly pear fruit / cemeteries
Henry Hinds
5NO ES POR PUNTOS
starlinx
2 +1prickly pears / cemetery or pantheon
Hazel Whiteley


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Tunas/tunas, panteones/cementerios


Explanation:
Las tunas son una clase de fruta y por lo general en algunos lugares se refiere a los cementerios como panteones.... o sea, el anciano era un vendedor ambulante que iba con su cacharrito vendiendo tunas :-)

Espero que esto te ayude.

Saludos :-)

Magda Miño
United States
Local time: 13:52
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Henry Hinds: Era tunero panteonero.
2 hrs

agree  LoreAC
4 hrs
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
prickly pears / cemetery or pantheon


Explanation:
Suena extraño eso de ir vendiendo peras por los cementerios.

Esto es lo que he encontrado en wordreference pero a ver qué sugieren los demás (yo tampoco soy de México...)


    wordreference
Hazel Whiteley
Local time: 18:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 548

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Sheilann: a prickly pear is the pear-shaped fruit of a cactus. You peel it and eat it.
32 mins

agree  Refugio: Yes, Sheila, and it is called a tuna.
15 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
prickly pear fruit / cemeteries


Explanation:
...he was always selling prickly pear fruit on street corners by the cemeteries.

No todo el mundo conoce las tunas pero aquí en la frontera las tenemos de a montones.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-23 13:57:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Pricky pear\" es \"nopal\" en castellano; también aparte de la fruta comemos \"nopalitos\", o sea la misma planta; ricos en la ensalada o cocidos con chile colorado...


    Exp.
Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 11:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 26512

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  starlinx: NOPAL = Prickly pear cactus.
7 hrs
  -> That's 4 more Kudoz... thanks.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
There are "tunas" and then there are "nopales". Panteon is cementery.


Explanation:
I have to comment on this 'cause I have a lot of "tunas" prickly pears in my fridge at the moment. You slice off skin and eat flesh and seeds - just swallow them right down! They are delicious and sweet, excellent cold; everyone loves them! They grow on top of the main part of the cactus and could be considered the fruity part.
However, I have no "nopales" which, according to Simon&Schuster's International Spanish Dictionary, is also prickly pear. One of these terms is wrong, because they are definitely two different things. Nopales are the equivalent of cactus rubbery "leaves" which are scraped, boiled and later chopped up to mix into scrambled eggs with tomato, onion and garlic, tacos, etc. They are said to be good for lowering blood pressure and about anything else that ails you. That said, they take a bit of getting used to, as they are rather tough and release an oozing liquid - that's why you boil them, to get rid of the ooze. Is this more than you wanted to know about tunas?

Jan Castillo
Local time: 13:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 66
Grading comment
Muchas gracias a todos por la ayuda :-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Henry Hinds: Right. You can eat it all, and for some folks in Mexico it's a good part of their diet.
57 mins

agree  starlinx
7 hrs
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
NO ES POR PUNTOS


Explanation:
Solo quiero agregar a los comentarios anteriores las diferencias en cuanto a lo que es la tuna y el nopal.

TUNA:(Higo de la India, Higo chumbo) Prickly pear, Indian fig, Barbary fig.

NOPAL: Prickly pear cactus, Indian fig tree, Barbary fig tree.

Los dos son deliciosos!! Saludos!!

starlinx
PRO pts in pair: 12
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