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fierro

English translation: Metal pole/rod/bar, unidentified metal object

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20:04 Jan 18, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Automotive / Cars & Trucks
Spanish term or phrase: fierro
Fierro has a lot of different meanings, but in this case it is being used to describe something that was broken off of the top of a city truck in an accident, when the truck passed under a bridge. The "fierro" extended above the top of the cab, and so it broke off. Could it be an antenna? I can't find anything anywhere confirming that fierro can mean that. How about those metal rail things on the tops of larger vehicles? (I don't know what those are officially called in English.) Is there anything else it could be? The term is used by a Spanish speaker who has spent many years in the US, who was probably originally from Mexico or Central America. Thank you for your help.
xxx1279
Local time: 02:22
English translation:Metal pole/rod/bar, unidentified metal object
Explanation:
In Spanish, "fierro" is often used to refer to some metal pole/bar. The material doesn't matter much, as long as it's metal, it could be iron, tin, whatever.

In the case you are mentioning, perhaps an exhaust pipe or something like that. I would say not an antenna, since the person would've said "antenna". The way you say "those metal rail things" is exactly the same level of precision the word "fierro" is used in this case, which is to say, vague. That is, the speaker does not know the technical term for the metal object he's referring to.

I hope this helps!
Selected response from:

Matt Timm
Argentina
Local time: 03:22
Grading comment
Thanks for your comments, Matt. I will choose a very general term, as you've suggested.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2(piece of) ironpclews
5Metal pole/rod/bar, unidentified metal object
Matt Timm
4rack
bigedsenior


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Metal pole/rod/bar, unidentified metal object


Explanation:
In Spanish, "fierro" is often used to refer to some metal pole/bar. The material doesn't matter much, as long as it's metal, it could be iron, tin, whatever.

In the case you are mentioning, perhaps an exhaust pipe or something like that. I would say not an antenna, since the person would've said "antenna". The way you say "those metal rail things" is exactly the same level of precision the word "fierro" is used in this case, which is to say, vague. That is, the speaker does not know the technical term for the metal object he's referring to.

I hope this helps!

Matt Timm
Argentina
Local time: 03:22
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks for your comments, Matt. I will choose a very general term, as you've suggested.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
(piece of) iron


Explanation:
"Fierro" is old Spanish, and like many other words, the "F" has become an "H" (Fablar/Hablar, Facer(Hacer). It seems some of these antiquated terms are still used in S. America.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-01-18 21:23:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Matt, you beat me by seconds! BTW, that should be a slash, not a left parenthesis in Facer/Hacer.


    Reference: http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsulta?TIPO_BUS=3&LEMA=fie...
pclews
Spain
Local time: 08:22
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Matt Timm: Absolutely. We also use "pollera", an archaic word for "falda". Our "vos" is also old form for "tú".
23 mins
  -> Tenés razón. Gracias.

agree  Daniel Parra: I was born in Fierro, Grant County, NM. It means "IRON".
1 hr
  -> Well, there you go, then!
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1 day1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
rack


Explanation:
Buses have light racks and luggage racks. Part of all of it could have come off.

bigedsenior
Local time: 23:22
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 342
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