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Banking stuff!

English translation: from what I've seen and helped out with

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16:34 Jan 10, 2003
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial / Banking, Internet
Spanish term or phrase: Banking stuff!
I'm confused (nothing new there!) I'm translating a guide to how to use Internet Banking. At first I thought it was dealing with a private bank account since terms like, una remesa permanente activa, and domiciliacion permanente, are used, which I took to mean standing order and direct debits. But then it goes on to talk about 'librados' and charging them etc, which sounds more like a company, since I believe librados refers to drawees, which we normal private bank account folk don't have to deal with.

I've spoken to the agency but have received no answer yet. In the meantime, does anyone know if these terms are reconciable? and in which case, what kind of banking to they both belong to?
Sorry to be so longwinded, but this project has a quick turnaround time and it's driving me crazy!!
Anna Moorby DipTrans
Local time: 12:31
English translation:from what I've seen and helped out with
Explanation:
librados are customers / clients of a business or company that charges a fee / amount periodically. This can be done very quickly by Internet banking, (I have two private schools and do this monthly) and it only requires setting up a database program usually provided by the bank and then sending the data at the time you wish to enact the transactions. Does that clear anything up? Hope so.
Selected response from:

johnclaude
Local time: 12:31
Grading comment
johnclaude you're a star!
Thanks everyone, all your answers helped clarify things a lot.
xx
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1libradosdiego asensio
5 +1see answerDavid Welch
5from what I've seen and helped out with
johnclaude


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
librados


Explanation:
If the text comes from Argentina; and I think it does; librados attached to a place or a dAte should mean that they were checks or other kind of payments were finally signed.
best luck.
d

diego asensio
Local time: 12:31
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 17

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxEDLING
13 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
from what I've seen and helped out with


Explanation:
librados are customers / clients of a business or company that charges a fee / amount periodically. This can be done very quickly by Internet banking, (I have two private schools and do this monthly) and it only requires setting up a database program usually provided by the bank and then sending the data at the time you wish to enact the transactions. Does that clear anything up? Hope so.

johnclaude
Local time: 12:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 460
Grading comment
johnclaude you're a star!
Thanks everyone, all your answers helped clarify things a lot.
xx
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
see answer


Explanation:
librado = drawee
librador = drawer

in finance, the drawer draws a bill of exchange on the drawee , ie in internet banking someone (the drawer) presents a bill to the internet bank drawn on the account of the drawee, who is the payor of the bill with the drawer becoming the payee.

el banco librado = the issuing bank

un cheque librado contra el banco "A" = a check drawn against the bank "A"

IN this context only:

librar = to draw or to issue

David Welch
United States
Local time: 06:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 124

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Herman Vilella: Librador = the drawer (taker). Librado = entity having funds to PAY the librador -- after perhaps many a bill of exchange or promisory note ( in "people terms" : I.O.U. or "pagaré") comes to the librado-to-be via circuitous routes.
1 hr
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