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ente emisor

English translation: issuing establishment

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15:45 May 23, 2003
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial / Monetary
Spanish term or phrase: ente emisor
The institution in charge of monetary policies...

What is the equivalent in English?

Thanks
Madeleine Pérusse
Local time: 03:30
English translation:issuing establishment
Explanation:
Oxford Spanish -English Dictionary
emisor - sora adj 1 (banco/entidad) issuing (before n)
emisor -sora (m, f 1 FIN issuer

often it is the central bank that is responsible for this task (monetary policy), so if you are sure this term corresponds to the central bank, I think it would be preferable to use central bank
Selected response from:

Lorianne Weston
Local time: 03:30
Grading comment
Thanks for your quickness... And thank you to everybody, especially Manuel, since I really appreciate good references... I'm sorry I can't grade everybody!

Madeleine
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4issuing establishmentLorianne Weston
5 +2Central bankafsdfds
5Central Bank/ Reserve Bank/ Federal Reserve / Federal Reserve SystemManuel Cedeño Berrueta
5issuing agency or authority
Henry Hinds


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
issuing establishment


Explanation:
Oxford Spanish -English Dictionary
emisor - sora adj 1 (banco/entidad) issuing (before n)
emisor -sora (m, f 1 FIN issuer

often it is the central bank that is responsible for this task (monetary policy), so if you are sure this term corresponds to the central bank, I think it would be preferable to use central bank

Lorianne Weston
Local time: 03:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 81
Grading comment
Thanks for your quickness... And thank you to everybody, especially Manuel, since I really appreciate good references... I'm sorry I can't grade everybody!

Madeleine

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Parrot: or entity
4 mins

agree  posada: si
12 mins

agree  MJ Barber
50 mins

agree  Claudia Orozco
2 hrs
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Central bank


Explanation:
son sinonimos

afsdfds
Argentina
Local time: 05:30
PRO pts in pair: 35

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maria-Jose Pastor
2 hrs
  -> Gracias, MJ

agree  Manuel Cedeño Berrueta
9 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
issuing agency or authority


Explanation:
Genérico como el original.


    Exp.
Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 02:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 26512
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Central Bank/ Reserve Bank/ Federal Reserve / Federal Reserve System


Explanation:
“Central Bank” is the key term used everywhere, even though the official name of the institution varies according to the country, as you can see from the references copied below.

Saludos,

Manuel

++++++

The Reserve Bank of Australia
In 1911, legislation established the Commonwealth Bank of Australia. In 1959, this original body corporate was preserved as the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) in legislation, specifically to carry on the central banking functions; at that same time, the commercial and savings banking functions were transferred into a new institution, which carried on the old name of Commonwealth Bank of Australia.
http://www.rba.gov.au/AboutTheRBA/History/history_of_the_rba...

++++++

Central banks apply short-term, activist monetary policy to reach their long-term targets. These short-term, activist policies need to be formalized to suit seasonal movements and business cycles. Policy implementation that disregards these factors can produce large swings in the financial markets. Short-term activist monetary policy actions may use intermediate targets which can be directly controlled by the central bank. These intermediate targets must be directly related to the ultimate goal.
http://www.tcmb.gov.tr/yeni/evds/konusma/ing/1997/MONPOL.htm...

+++++++

The Federal Reserve System (called the Fed, for short) is the nation's central bank. It was established by an Act of Congress in 1913 and consists of the seven members of the Board of Governors in Washington, D.C., and twelve Federal Reserve District Banks (for a discussion of the Fed's overall responsibilities, see The Federal Reserve System: Purposes and Functions).
The Congress structured the Fed to be independent within the government--that is, although the Fed is accountable to the Congress, it is insulated from day-to-day political pressures. This reflects the conviction that the people who control the country's money supply should be independent of the people who frame the government's spending decisions. Most studies of central bank independence rank the Fed among the most independent in the world.

http://www.frbsf.org/econrsrch/wklyltr/wklyltr99/el99-01.htm...

+++++++++

(…) When independent, the central bank is responsible for domestic monetary policy, while the government has authority for establishing international monetary commitments and only governments are members of the IMF. Except under flexible exchange rate regimes, the government and the central bank must co-operate in setting exchange rate policy. The relationship between the central bank and the government is generally not a matter of legislation. On the contrary, the Treaty attempts to be explicit. Article 109 is the result of harshly negotiated compromise. The supporters of a domestic price stability oriented policy, led by the German negotiators, feared that exchange rate policy could be used as a back door to governmental control over monetary policy. Other governments, led by the French government, who made concessions on the domestic side, feared to lose control on external monetary policy.

The balance of authority between the central bank and the government differs from country to country. In Germany, under exchange rate stabilisation arrangements such as the EMS, the government maintains its predominance. Under the flexible exchange rate regime that prevails vis-à-vis the dollar, the Bundesbank enjoys some de facto discretion (Henning, 1994). The government must consult with the Buba on exchange rate policy, and the bank is freed from its obligation to intervene when that would undermine domestic price stability. The bank owns all German official reserves and is responsible for conducting foreign exchange interventions. German officials proposed to give the European central bank extensive powers, more important than those now given to the Bundesbank.
http://www.europarl.eu.int/workingpapers/econ/101/chap3_en.h...
+++++++


Manuel Cedeño Berrueta
Local time: 04:30
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 1094
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