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Aqui/Ahí donde le ves

English translation: XXX here is... / There goes a ...

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Aqui/Ahí donde le ves
English translation:XXX here is... / There goes a ...
Entered by: Cinnamon Nolan
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

07:23 Mar 30, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Cinema, Film, TV, Drama
Spanish term or phrase: Aqui/Ahí donde le ves
It's simple, but I can't come up with a good equivalent.
Spanish to USA English; general conversation in a script.

Presenting the person:
Juan, aquí donde lo ves, acabará la carrera pronto...

Talking about him after he's just left:
Ahí donde le ves, es una persona muy buena y generosa.
Cinnamon Nolan
Spain
Local time: 18:58
Aqui donde lo ves: Meet/Ahí donde lo ves: There goes
Explanation:
Presenting the person: "Meet Juan, who ..."

afterwards, after he's gone "There goes a good and very generous person"

In my experience, the latter phrase can be said with a great deal of affection of someone who has departed...

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-03-30 09:16:45 GMT)
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Sorry, but I'm UK EN! Don't know if this makes a difference, but might inspire a natural sounding expression in US EN - I hope!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-03-30 09:18:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Instead of the rather bald "Meet Juan..", you could always use something softer, such as "I'd like to introduce you to Juan...", or any of those standard expressions of introduction
Selected response from:

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:58
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for their help. The presentation actually took another form, but this would work very well.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5believe it or not
Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
3 +5Aqui donde lo ves: Meet/Ahí donde lo ves: There goes
Carol Gullidge
5right here / right there
Carla_am
4Right before your eyes / behold / there you havexxxtazdog
4See Juan here/There he goes a.....
bcsantos
3Who you can see here/there
Edward Tully
3as you see him/as people gofranglish
3That person you saw here
jude dabo


  

Answers


37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Right before your eyes / behold / there you have


Explanation:
Hmm...see what you mean!

Maybe "right before your eyes" or "Behold" for the first one and "there you have" for the second one? (And there you have him, a very good and generous person.)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 39 mins (2008-03-30 08:02:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Behold Juan, who...
Here, right before your eyes, is Juan, who...
or even "Here you see Juan, who..."

I think I prefer the first one.

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 18:58
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 27
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
as you see him/as people go


Explanation:
Juan, as you se him, will...

As people go, he's a very good and generous person

franglish
Switzerland
Local time: 18:58
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 7
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Aqui donde lo ves: Meet/Ahí donde lo ves: There goes


Explanation:
Presenting the person: "Meet Juan, who ..."

afterwards, after he's gone "There goes a good and very generous person"

In my experience, the latter phrase can be said with a great deal of affection of someone who has departed...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-03-30 09:16:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Sorry, but I'm UK EN! Don't know if this makes a difference, but might inspire a natural sounding expression in US EN - I hope!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-03-30 09:18:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------


Instead of the rather bald "Meet Juan..", you could always use something softer, such as "I'd like to introduce you to Juan...", or any of those standard expressions of introduction

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 34
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for their help. The presentation actually took another form, but this would work very well.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bubo Coromandus
41 mins
  -> thanks Deborah!

agree  Sinead --
1 hr
  -> thanks Sinead!

agree  Noni Gilbert: For UK, greta. Any US comments? Another of those expressions we take for granted...
2 hrs
  -> thanks Noni - yes it certainly is

agree  Egmont
2 hrs
  -> thanks AVRVM!

agree  Marina56: ok
4 hrs
  -> thanks Marina!
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Who you can see here/there


Explanation:
Another option, "Juan, who you can see here/there"...

Edward Tully
Local time: 18:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 65
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
believe it or not


Explanation:
Suerte

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Note added at 2 horas (2008-03-30 09:43:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Este dicho se utiliza mucho en español para expresar el sentido de "lo creas o no lo creas"...

Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
Spain
Local time: 18:58
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 62

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxjacana54
3 hrs
  -> Gracias Lucia

agree  rdom: Yes, it is a slightly ironical expression.
15 hrs
  -> Gracias rdom

agree  moken: Difícil encontrar una equivalencia exacta. Para mí, este es el giro más cercano. :O) :O)
23 hrs
  -> Gracias Álvaro

agree  Gabriel Bustos
1 day7 hrs
  -> Gracias Gabriel

agree  Ce_Lanzillotta
2 days17 hrs
  -> Gracias Cecilia
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
That person you saw here


Explanation:
cheers

jude dabo
Local time: 17:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
See Juan here/There he goes a.....


Explanation:
It is a colloquial expression difficult to translate. hope this sounds good.

bcsantos
Gibraltar
Local time: 18:58
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day21 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
right here / right there


Explanation:
That's what it sounds like to me

Carla_am
Argentina
Local time: 13:58
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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