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maliciada

English translation: over-sophisticated / sceptical

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:maliciada
English translation:over-sophisticated / sceptical
Entered by: Bubo Coromandus
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

10:03 Apr 5, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Cinema, Film, TV, Drama / Third (world) cinema
Spanish term or phrase: maliciada
Maybe I'm just tired - I can't perform the mental gymnastics required to work out what 'maliciada' might mean here. Any help would be appreciated.

También toleramos bien el melodrama, en desuso en Occidente: un referente histórico duro y una sociedad atrasada justifican tanto la intensidad desgarrada como la “ingenuidad” de la dramaturgia, recursos que nuestra *** maliciada ficción *** ya no soporta pero que nos gusta ver cuando el guión (histórico) lo exige.
Cath St Clair
Spain
Local time: 16:48
over-sophisticated
Explanation:
"maliciarse" has two distinct meanings, as per the two dictionary entries below:

maliciarse

reflex.
(sospechar) to be suspicious
(malear) to go bad, become spoiled
http://education.yahoo.com/reference/dict_en_es/spanish/mali...

maliciar.

1. tr. Recelar, sospechar, presumir algo con malicia. U. t. c. prnl.

2. tr. malear (‖ echar a perder).
http://rae2.es/maliciar

- in your context "maliciada" seems to contrast with the "ingenuidad" mentioned just before, which is why I have suggested "over-sophisticated" (i.e. it has lost its ingenuousness). This would correspond to the second of the two dictionary meanings ("spoiled").
Selected response from:

Bubo Coromandus
Grading comment
I ended up consulting the author, as the suggestions here were so varied. He said that his intention was the opposite of 'ingenuous', for which reason I chose 'over-sophisticated'. I also liked 'sceptical' which I am including in the glossary. Thanks to all.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4sceptical
Carol Gullidge
5 +1jaded
Sandra Rodriguez
4surmising fictionMaria Kisic
4over-sophisticatedBubo Coromandus
3 +1Wicked
Gad Kohenov
4malevolentmargaret caulfield
4maligned/much maligned
bcsantos


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
maligned/much maligned


Explanation:
Does this help?

bcsantos
Gibraltar
Local time: 17:48
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
malevolent


Explanation:
Just my version here.

margaret caulfield
Local time: 17:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
sceptical


Explanation:
incredulous; disbelieving; etc

The closest I can find in Collins: maliciarse = to suspect; to have one's suspicions

This would tie in with ingenuousness ("ingenuidad" de la dramaturgia). People are either delighted by ingenuousness, or suspicious/sceptical of it!

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:48
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 34

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gracie: yes, as maliciar means to suspect (Oxford Bilingual)
19 mins
  -> many thanks, Gracie! Collins only has maliciarse

agree  Egmont
1 hr
  -> thanks AVRVM!

agree  De Novi
5 hrs
  -> thanks Zanne!

agree  lluvia39
1 day4 hrs
  -> thanks lluvia!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Wicked


Explanation:
Otra opcion.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2008-04-05 12:05:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

DISTRUSTED is to be taken into consideration too (looks better than sceptical in my opinion).

Gad Kohenov
Israel
Local time: 18:48
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in HebrewHebrew

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Florcy: Me parece la mejor opción, porque maliciada NO es sinónimo de maligna ni de malévola... sutilezas del lenguaje.Suerte!
6 mins

neutral  Carol Gullidge: I'm trying to figure out WHY it looks better than sceptical! (in what way, on what grounds...?) And, talking about "ingenuidad", surely it should be distrustING, not distrusted - which brings us back to "sceptical"
4 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
jaded


Explanation:
jaded
Dulled by surfeit; sated
Cynically or pretentiously callous.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/jaded

Also: malicious/ blasé / jaundiced


Sandra Rodriguez
Puerto Rico
Local time: 11:48
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Janine Libbey
3 hrs
  -> Gracias!
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
surmising fiction


Explanation:
Another option...

Maria Kisic
Local time: 11:48
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
over-sophisticated


Explanation:
"maliciarse" has two distinct meanings, as per the two dictionary entries below:

maliciarse

reflex.
(sospechar) to be suspicious
(malear) to go bad, become spoiled
http://education.yahoo.com/reference/dict_en_es/spanish/mali...

maliciar.

1. tr. Recelar, sospechar, presumir algo con malicia. U. t. c. prnl.

2. tr. malear (‖ echar a perder).
http://rae2.es/maliciar

- in your context "maliciada" seems to contrast with the "ingenuidad" mentioned just before, which is why I have suggested "over-sophisticated" (i.e. it has lost its ingenuousness). This would correspond to the second of the two dictionary meanings ("spoiled").

Bubo Coromandus
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 79
Grading comment
I ended up consulting the author, as the suggestions here were so varied. He said that his intention was the opposite of 'ingenuous', for which reason I chose 'over-sophisticated'. I also liked 'sceptical' which I am including in the glossary. Thanks to all.
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Changes made by editors
Apr 16, 2008 - Changes made by Bubo Coromandus:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/131402">Cath St Clair's</a> old entry - "maliciada " » "over-sophisticated/sceptical"


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