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Genero policial

English translation: police genre

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Genero policial
English translation:police genre
Entered by: Michael Powers (PhD)
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

14:58 May 26, 2003
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Cinema, Film, TV, Drama / Cinema
Spanish term or phrase: Genero policial
Dentro de lo que es cine y television. " La película XXX revolucionó el genero policial"
Accents
police genre
Explanation:
+

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:18:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

373 hits on Internet for \"police genre\"

one example

Domestic TV fiction, Country by country
1. The Reinforcement of Tendencies: French TV Fiction in 2000 (R. Chaniac, J.P. Jézéquel)
Contents:

The Audiovisual Landscape: A New Law
The Origins of Fiction: Offer Stabilisation
Domestic TV Fiction in 2000: The Weakness of Daytime
Successes and Failures: Always the Same
The Evolution of the Police Genre: Obsession with Social Problems

List of tables:
Market share of French TV channels



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:20:05 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

373 hits on Internet for \"police genre\"

one example

Domestic TV fiction, Country by country
1. The Reinforcement of Tendencies: French TV Fiction in 2000 (R. Chaniac, J.P. Jézéquel)
Contents:

The Audiovisual Landscape: A New Law
The Origins of Fiction: Offer Stabilisation
Domestic TV Fiction in 2000: The Weakness of Daytime
Successes and Failures: Always the Same
The Evolution of the Police Genre: Obsession with Social Problems

List of tables:
Market share of French TV channels

Another example\"



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:20:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Anoather example



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:21:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another example

Excerpt from Dissident Voices by Mike Wayne
Counter-Hegemonic Strategies
in Between the Lines

The police genre, like most genres, depends on a high level of recurrent visual imagery (or iconography), thematic obsessions and recycled narrative strategies.í Despite this standardisation, the police genre, like all genres, is not fixed and static but dynamic and changeable. The possibilities for ëbendingí the genre have attracted left cultural workers who have wanted to both dramatise contemporary social and political issues and reach large audiences. Writers, directors and producers like John McGrath, Troy Kennedy Martin, G. F. Newman, Tony Garnett and John Wilsher have all worked within the genre for this purpose. One of my intentions in this chapter is to give, as far as space allows, some voice to the intentions and perspectives of such cultural workers in the television industry. Yet such ëauthorsí do not work in a vacuum.

The accumulated history of the police genre pushes the cultural worker in certain directions, determining how and what can be said. But at the same time, a genre is more or less malleable and open to reinscription. How far the genre can be inflected in new directions depends on the wider contexts of production and consumption as much as on the individual cultural workers concerned. The context of consumption, for example, asserts itself via the conventions of genres which establish a kind of ëcontractí with audiences, mapping out the terms on which cultural workers and audiences meet and communicate in the semiotic space of the text. To paraphrase Martin Barker, a whole range of social relationships are implicitly sedimented into generic conventions.2 Thus we can expect wider sociocultural contradictions to be inscribed into the terms of the contract which such conventions establish with their audiences. I will explore this in relation to the role of the police hero/heroine in the narrative structure.

As far as the context of production is concerned, writers, producers, directors, etc., also work with and within definite industrial facilities, constraints and pressures. Central to this context is the way the text is enmeshed in processes that produce and define it as a cultural commodity. ëCulturalí because televisionís texts are ó in the broadest sense of the term ó symbolic goods, resonating with the meanings, values, desires and anxieties in wider social circulation. ëCommodityí because televisionís texts are also economic goods, attempting to accumulate profits, if advertising funded, and/or (for the BBC) to compete in the ratings wars.

The cultural and economic dimensions of the text are often pulling in different directions and, as has been argued in relation to the single play, economic considerations may transform or even erase the text.3 I will trace some of the tensions between Between the Lines as a cultural good and as an economic good, across a few key textual strategies. Essentially, I have been summarising Tom Ryallís recasting of Marxian theory into the model illustrated in Figure 2.1. This offers a methodology for exploring the relationships between cultural workers, audiences, genres, texts and contexts. As can be seen from the diagram, Ryall completes the methodology by circumscribing cultural production and consumption within the wider sociopolitical context. I want to start with a brief sketch of this wider context.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:22:06 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The final example

Between good and evil, duty and self; an existence on a knife\'s edge, leaning on either one side would bring disastrous consequences. The relationship between Michael Wong and Anthony Wong is a continuation of Long and Winding Road and Armageddon and, together with all the changes after 1997, the responsibility carried by the characters is even heavier and more paradoxical. The structure of the film is unusual, using the conventions of the police genre and triad genre to simplify the story, leaving room for details that builds the characterization. Except for a middle section that lacks development, the script is accomplished in its depiction of characters, examination of roles and control of atmosphere. Keeping a delicate balance between commerce and personal expression, this is an admirable work. - Keeto

Selected response from:

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 13:12
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1police dramaJane Lamb-Ruiz
4 +1police genre
Michael Powers (PhD)


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
police genre


Explanation:
+

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:18:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

373 hits on Internet for \"police genre\"

one example

Domestic TV fiction, Country by country
1. The Reinforcement of Tendencies: French TV Fiction in 2000 (R. Chaniac, J.P. Jézéquel)
Contents:

The Audiovisual Landscape: A New Law
The Origins of Fiction: Offer Stabilisation
Domestic TV Fiction in 2000: The Weakness of Daytime
Successes and Failures: Always the Same
The Evolution of the Police Genre: Obsession with Social Problems

List of tables:
Market share of French TV channels



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:20:05 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

373 hits on Internet for \"police genre\"

one example

Domestic TV fiction, Country by country
1. The Reinforcement of Tendencies: French TV Fiction in 2000 (R. Chaniac, J.P. Jézéquel)
Contents:

The Audiovisual Landscape: A New Law
The Origins of Fiction: Offer Stabilisation
Domestic TV Fiction in 2000: The Weakness of Daytime
Successes and Failures: Always the Same
The Evolution of the Police Genre: Obsession with Social Problems

List of tables:
Market share of French TV channels

Another example\"



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:20:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Anoather example



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:21:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another example

Excerpt from Dissident Voices by Mike Wayne
Counter-Hegemonic Strategies
in Between the Lines

The police genre, like most genres, depends on a high level of recurrent visual imagery (or iconography), thematic obsessions and recycled narrative strategies.í Despite this standardisation, the police genre, like all genres, is not fixed and static but dynamic and changeable. The possibilities for ëbendingí the genre have attracted left cultural workers who have wanted to both dramatise contemporary social and political issues and reach large audiences. Writers, directors and producers like John McGrath, Troy Kennedy Martin, G. F. Newman, Tony Garnett and John Wilsher have all worked within the genre for this purpose. One of my intentions in this chapter is to give, as far as space allows, some voice to the intentions and perspectives of such cultural workers in the television industry. Yet such ëauthorsí do not work in a vacuum.

The accumulated history of the police genre pushes the cultural worker in certain directions, determining how and what can be said. But at the same time, a genre is more or less malleable and open to reinscription. How far the genre can be inflected in new directions depends on the wider contexts of production and consumption as much as on the individual cultural workers concerned. The context of consumption, for example, asserts itself via the conventions of genres which establish a kind of ëcontractí with audiences, mapping out the terms on which cultural workers and audiences meet and communicate in the semiotic space of the text. To paraphrase Martin Barker, a whole range of social relationships are implicitly sedimented into generic conventions.2 Thus we can expect wider sociocultural contradictions to be inscribed into the terms of the contract which such conventions establish with their audiences. I will explore this in relation to the role of the police hero/heroine in the narrative structure.

As far as the context of production is concerned, writers, producers, directors, etc., also work with and within definite industrial facilities, constraints and pressures. Central to this context is the way the text is enmeshed in processes that produce and define it as a cultural commodity. ëCulturalí because televisionís texts are ó in the broadest sense of the term ó symbolic goods, resonating with the meanings, values, desires and anxieties in wider social circulation. ëCommodityí because televisionís texts are also economic goods, attempting to accumulate profits, if advertising funded, and/or (for the BBC) to compete in the ratings wars.

The cultural and economic dimensions of the text are often pulling in different directions and, as has been argued in relation to the single play, economic considerations may transform or even erase the text.3 I will trace some of the tensions between Between the Lines as a cultural good and as an economic good, across a few key textual strategies. Essentially, I have been summarising Tom Ryallís recasting of Marxian theory into the model illustrated in Figure 2.1. This offers a methodology for exploring the relationships between cultural workers, audiences, genres, texts and contexts. As can be seen from the diagram, Ryall completes the methodology by circumscribing cultural production and consumption within the wider sociopolitical context. I want to start with a brief sketch of this wider context.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:22:06 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The final example

Between good and evil, duty and self; an existence on a knife\'s edge, leaning on either one side would bring disastrous consequences. The relationship between Michael Wong and Anthony Wong is a continuation of Long and Winding Road and Armageddon and, together with all the changes after 1997, the responsibility carried by the characters is even heavier and more paradoxical. The structure of the film is unusual, using the conventions of the police genre and triad genre to simplify the story, leaving room for details that builds the characterization. Except for a middle section that lacks development, the script is accomplished in its depiction of characters, examination of roles and control of atmosphere. Keeping a delicate balance between commerce and personal expression, this is an admirable work. - Keeto



Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 13:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 82

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  colemh
14 mins
  -> thank you, colemh :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
police drama


Explanation:
BRITTISH POLICE DRAMA;THE BILL, bold, bold, My Favorite Links:Other Links
I like to look At! The Bill Offical Website, The Bill Visual Updates Site, ...
www.geocities.com/embug232410772003/ BRITTISH_POLICE_DRAMA.html - 8k - Cached - Similar pages

City By The Sea a solid, no-frills police drama | The Guelph ...
City By The Sea a solid, no-frills police drama Saturday September 21, 2002 GREG
ROTHWELL The Guelph Mercury Sitting through City By The Sea, I started to ...
www.guelphmercury.com/entertainment/rothwell/ entertainment_rothwell_0209219218.html - 20k - Cached - Similar pages

Ray Liotta returns to form in police drama Narc | The Guelph ...
Ray Liotta returns to form in police drama Narc Saturday January 18, 2003 GREG ROTHWELL
The Guelph Mercury The seedy, dangerous netherworld of the undercover ...
www.guelphmercury.com/entertainment/rothwell/ entertainment_rothwell_0301188024.html - 21k - Cached - Similar pages

BBC NEWS | Entertainment | TV and Radio | 'Corrupt' police drama ...
... Monday, 22 July, 2002, 17:30 GMT 18:30 UK 'Corrupt' police drama to air in UK Los
Angeles police were angered by their portrayal A television police drama that ...
news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/ tv_and_radio/2144703.stm - 40k - Cached - Similar pages

MRC FilmFinder-Crime & Police Drama Filmography
... MRC FilmFinder-Crime & Police Drama Filmography MRC Home | Filmfinder
Records 1 - 50 ...
www.lib.unc.edu/house/mrc/films/genre.php?genre_id=6 - 48k - Cached - Similar pages

PoughkeepsieJournal.com - Dispatchers juggle police drama



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:35:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

TV= police drama OR series



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:37:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

MOVIES

... give splendid performances in \"Training Day,\" a character-driven police drama. ... IMDb
Genre Browser - Drama Find out more about dramatic movies by perusing ...
homevideo.about.com/cs/drama/index_2.htm - 33k - Cached - Similar pages

Training Day - DVD Review and Product Summary
... The Bottom Line - Denzel Washington and Ethan Hawke give splendid performances
in \"Training Day,\" a character-driven police drama. ...
homevideo.about.com/library/weekly/aapr032702.htm - 34k - Cached - Similar pages
[ More results from homevideo.about.com ]

The Advocate Online Movies: Dark Blue\'s drama refreshing 02/28/ ...
... Poor (.). An audacious police drama, Dark Blue tells a story of institutionalized
corruption in the Los Angeles Police Department. Based ...
www.theadvocate.com/stories/022803/ mov_darkblue001.shtml - 17k - Cached - Similar pages



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-26 15:38:48 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Please NOTE: the word GENRE in English is used in FILM STUDIES and not in journalistic prose....

If you are referring to the CATEGORY used in the industry, use police drama

IF uou are referrring to an ARTISTIC and CRITICAL category, use GENRE



Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 40

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  María Isabel Estévez (maisa)
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Changes made by editors
May 21, 2005 - Changes made by Michael Powers (PhD):
FieldOther » Social Sciences


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