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secreto de ibérico

English translation: Iberico pork fillet

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:secreto de ibérico
English translation:Iberico pork fillet
Entered by: Charmian Davies
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09:41 Nov 6, 2007
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
Spanish term or phrase: secreto de ibérico
This comes in a menu - anyone have any idea what it is in English?
Charmian Davies
Local time: 10:35
Iberico "secreto" (Iberico pork fillet)
Explanation:
Rachel's research is correct, but a few further points can be made.

1. The cut known as secreto is a distinct piece, separated by fat both from the paletilla and the cabecero de lomo (this last is distinct from lomo and is also known as aguja).
2. It is present in ALL pigs, not just Ibericos, although there is a growing rumour that only ibericos have it (thus it can be sold at iberico prices!).
3. Ibericos are normally slaughtered at around 180kg, leaving a secreto of betw 600 and 700g, well worth cutting out.
4. Organic pigs are slaughtered at around 130 kgs in Spain, providing a secreto of approx 400/500g (my area of speciality!)
4. "Conventional" white pigs weigh in at slaughter at around 110 kgs, so the piece in them is hardly worth cutting out, hence the fact that it wasn't widely available until recently popularized.

Thus we shouldn't be calling it pork loin. But what to call it? Unofrtunately I do not have direct phone access to English butchers, so have to rely on charts and my own experience with export. A further problem is that continental and UK butchering cuts up into different pieces....

Acc to this chart for instance, the piece would fall between the rib loin/shoulder and the fore shoulder which is the bottom half of the paletilla in our terms: http://thefoody.com/basic/pork.html Not much use in other words!

And further trawling (both UK and US) produces not a trace of a mention of this cut. If there are any English trained butchers out there, perhaps they cd confirm, but imo we will have to stay with the Spanish term with an explanation. No need to use the English word secret, since the Spanish word is self-explanatory. As for Ibérico, since this is a term protected by law in Spain, then we can stay with it. There has been much discussion of this on other proz occasions. Rachel's "pork fillet" seems a good non-committal description but if a guest wanted more detail, you'd have to say sth along lines of low shoulder cut, or cut from just below the loin.... What will fit on the menu?


Selected response from:

Noni Gilbert
Spain
Local time: 10:35
Grading comment
Many thanks to everyone for their help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +4Iberico "secreto" (Iberico pork fillet)
Noni Gilbert
4 +2Lean Iberian pork loinRachel Stein
5Skirt meat of the Ibérico pigalbuck99
4from iberian secretMaria523


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
from iberian secret


Explanation:
(iberian a European Term)

Maria523
Local time: 04:35
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  neilmac: ... and why no capital letter on "Iberian" ?
3 hrs
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Lean Iberian pork loin


Explanation:
"Secreto de ibérico" is a special cut of the best Iberian pork located the between the "paletilla" (shoulder blade) and "tocino" (bacon/ loin). In other words, along the broad back of the pig.

I haven't been able to find a direct translation for that area of the pig. So "Iberian pork fillet" or "Iberian pork loin" are good options if you don't mind leaving it general. You could also throw in a "lean" or "fine" before to make it sound more appealing - "Fine/ Lean Iberian pork fillet/loin"

Another decent option would be to leave it in Spanish, given that it's a special part of the pig and you might not want the restaurant customer to think it's any old fillet or loin. In my reasoning, if you left it Iberian pork "secreto" this would force the customer to ask the waiter what "secreto" means and thus they would receive an explanation of why the meat is special.

Hope this was helpful!

Hope this explanation helps!



Rachel Stein
Local time: 10:35
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maria523: thanks
0 min

agree  Sinead --: Impressive research!
18 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Iberico "secreto" (Iberico pork fillet)


Explanation:
Rachel's research is correct, but a few further points can be made.

1. The cut known as secreto is a distinct piece, separated by fat both from the paletilla and the cabecero de lomo (this last is distinct from lomo and is also known as aguja).
2. It is present in ALL pigs, not just Ibericos, although there is a growing rumour that only ibericos have it (thus it can be sold at iberico prices!).
3. Ibericos are normally slaughtered at around 180kg, leaving a secreto of betw 600 and 700g, well worth cutting out.
4. Organic pigs are slaughtered at around 130 kgs in Spain, providing a secreto of approx 400/500g (my area of speciality!)
4. "Conventional" white pigs weigh in at slaughter at around 110 kgs, so the piece in them is hardly worth cutting out, hence the fact that it wasn't widely available until recently popularized.

Thus we shouldn't be calling it pork loin. But what to call it? Unofrtunately I do not have direct phone access to English butchers, so have to rely on charts and my own experience with export. A further problem is that continental and UK butchering cuts up into different pieces....

Acc to this chart for instance, the piece would fall between the rib loin/shoulder and the fore shoulder which is the bottom half of the paletilla in our terms: http://thefoody.com/basic/pork.html Not much use in other words!

And further trawling (both UK and US) produces not a trace of a mention of this cut. If there are any English trained butchers out there, perhaps they cd confirm, but imo we will have to stay with the Spanish term with an explanation. No need to use the English word secret, since the Spanish word is self-explanatory. As for Ibérico, since this is a term protected by law in Spain, then we can stay with it. There has been much discussion of this on other proz occasions. Rachel's "pork fillet" seems a good non-committal description but if a guest wanted more detail, you'd have to say sth along lines of low shoulder cut, or cut from just below the loin.... What will fit on the menu?




Noni Gilbert
Spain
Local time: 10:35
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 229
Grading comment
Many thanks to everyone for their help.
Notes to answerer
Asker: I think I am going for fillet - loin seems too specific to me too. What I am translating is not a menu as such, but a guide book which lists the specialities of each restaurant. Many thanks for your help


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  moken: It's been around Cádiz for donkeys. I'd been told that it was taken around the back of the neck, and that the name owed to its 'hidden' location. Bit of Andalusian porklore I suppose. :O) :O)
18 mins
  -> Great word! Thanks Álvaro.

agree  Vania de Souza: In Portugal we call it "secreto" when translating menus, andleave it at that
45 mins
  -> Good to know. Thanks.

agree  Elizabeth Joy Pitt de Morales: I usually see "secreto" on menus here in Malaga.
1 hr
  -> Thanks Elizabeth.

agree  neilmac: I prefer "Iberian" though...
2 hrs
  -> I can understand that - but the problem is over the technical (ie legal) meaning of Iberico - really if they say Iberian they could be giving you any old pork - not that I'm distrustful or anything....! Thanks Neil.
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1101 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Skirt meat of the Ibérico pig


Explanation:
Secreto Ibérico is the skirt meat - the flap of meat from inside the front end of the ribcage. It is the diaphragm, known as "skirt" in beef. I am a trained UK butcher, hope this helps. It would be almost impossible to find out just using translation techniques.

albuck99
Local time: 09:35
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