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templado de vainill

English translation: (warm?) crème moulée

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13:56 Apr 23, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / Menu
Spanish term or phrase: templado de vainill
coming to the end now...
Dado de leche frita con helado de canela y templado de vainill
Edward Tully
Local time: 05:36
English translation:(warm?) crème moulée
Explanation:
Hi again Ed,

Not much to go on on the web, so I must admit that this is more of a gut feeling than anything else and that it simlpy refers to custard, which doesn't soundsmuch like haute cuisine to me. You'll find a variety of names in French according to exactly how it's served, so you can judge for yourself whether any of them fit the bill better than crème moulée. See below:

Custard is a range of preparations based on milk and eggs, thickened with heat. Most commonly, it refers to a dessert or dessert sauce, but custard bases are also used for quiches and other savoury foods. As a dessert, it is made from a combination of milk or cream, egg yolks, sugar, and vanilla. Sometimes flour, corn starch, or gelatin are also added. In French cookery, custard—called simply "crème" or more precisely "crème moulée"—is never thickened in this way: when starch is added, it is pastry cream crème pâtissière; when gelatin is added, it is crème anglaise collée. Depending on how much egg or thickener is used, custard may vary in consistency from a thin pouring sauce (crème anglaise), to a thick blancmange like that used for vanilla slice or the pastry cream used to fill éclairs.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Custard

Good luck again!

Álvaro :O)

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Note added at 17 hrs (2008-04-24 07:11:00 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Welcome Ed. I'd just like to note though that this is only an approximation - I just saw MargoZ' coulis suggestion and a warm vanilla coulis would sound very chic. You'll find a number of results for vanilla coulis or coulis de vainilla, indicating that a coulis does not necessarily have to be fruit or vegetable, and the 'warm' would be called for since coulis is normally cold. :O)
Selected response from:

moken
Local time: 04:36
Grading comment
great help again - thank you Álvaro! ;-) I will never do a menu again!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3(warm?) crème moulée
moken


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
(warm?) crème moulée


Explanation:
Hi again Ed,

Not much to go on on the web, so I must admit that this is more of a gut feeling than anything else and that it simlpy refers to custard, which doesn't soundsmuch like haute cuisine to me. You'll find a variety of names in French according to exactly how it's served, so you can judge for yourself whether any of them fit the bill better than crème moulée. See below:

Custard is a range of preparations based on milk and eggs, thickened with heat. Most commonly, it refers to a dessert or dessert sauce, but custard bases are also used for quiches and other savoury foods. As a dessert, it is made from a combination of milk or cream, egg yolks, sugar, and vanilla. Sometimes flour, corn starch, or gelatin are also added. In French cookery, custard—called simply "crème" or more precisely "crème moulée"—is never thickened in this way: when starch is added, it is pastry cream crème pâtissière; when gelatin is added, it is crème anglaise collée. Depending on how much egg or thickener is used, custard may vary in consistency from a thin pouring sauce (crème anglaise), to a thick blancmange like that used for vanilla slice or the pastry cream used to fill éclairs.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Custard

Good luck again!

Álvaro :O)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2008-04-24 07:11:00 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Welcome Ed. I'd just like to note though that this is only an approximation - I just saw MargoZ' coulis suggestion and a warm vanilla coulis would sound very chic. You'll find a number of results for vanilla coulis or coulis de vainilla, indicating that a coulis does not necessarily have to be fruit or vegetable, and the 'warm' would be called for since coulis is normally cold. :O)

moken
Local time: 04:36
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 87
Grading comment
great help again - thank you Álvaro! ;-) I will never do a menu again!
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