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escaloña

English translation: shallot

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:escaloña
English translation:shallot
Entered by: Kate Major
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18:16 Apr 26, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / Menu item
Spanish term or phrase: escaloña
Is this a typo? No more context than what appears below, I´m afraid. This is from a menu for a restaurant specializing in German dishes. Any ideas? It's melted what? Cheese???For UK audience

Jugosa hamburguesa de ternera servida con ***escaloñas*** fundidas
Kate Major
Spain
Local time: 03:51
scallion / spring onion
Explanation:
AFAIK, that's what these are (spellings vary). Not sure how they plan on getting them "fundidas"...

http://books.google.es/books?id=_W8BAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA280&lpg=PA...

A scallion, also commonly known as spring onion or green onion, is associated with various members of the genus Allium that lack a fully-developed bulb.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scallion

Escalona, Escalunya o Escaluña: variedad de cebolla que no hace llorar
http://foroantiguo.infojardin.com/showthread.php?t=161235

Es común una variante del cultivo de la cebolla, a la que se denomina cebolla o cebolleta escalona, con el cual se aprovechan las cebollas en las que ha comenzado a brotar el tallo (y empeoran, por tanto, sus propiedades organolépticas).
www.cifaed.es/downloader.php?path=archivos/publicaciones/&n...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 32 mins (2008-04-26 18:49:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Now I've just found this, which seems to point more towards "shallot":

La chalote o escaloña es una pequeña cebolla pero con “dientes” como los ajos. Se trata de Allium cepa, variedad ascolonicum. Se consume cocida o troceada y frita. Procede de Asia menor.
Las mismas plagas y enfermedades que la cebolla.
http://www.mercasa.es/nueva/revista/pdf76/enciclopedia.pdf

And this:

La chalota, echalote o ***escalonia*** es una verdura de la familia de las aliáceas. Podemos situar su origen en Asia central. Su nombre procede de Ascalón ciudad de Israel donde se cultivaba.
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_ascalonicum

Which links to:

The term Shallot is used to describe two different Allium species of plant. The French grey shallot or griselle, which has been considered to be the "true shallot" by many, is Allium oschaninii, a species that grows wild from Central to Southwest Asia. Other varieties of shallot are Allium cepa var. aggregatum (multiplier onions), also known as A. ascalonicum.[citation needed]

This ambiguity is further confused by confusion with scallions, also known as spring or green onions. In some countries green onions are called shallots, and shallots are referred to by alternative names such as eschallot or eschalotte.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shallot


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 36 mins (2008-04-26 18:53:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK...so "melted shallots" does, apparently, exist (go figure):

SANDWICHES

Melted Cheese and Onion French Baguette with Oven-Dried Tomato, Melted Shallots, Cucumber and Arugula Salad
http://www.ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/BeijingFinancialStr...

Grilled Pizza – Sauteed Cremini Mushrooms, Melted Shallots, Smoked Bacon, Mozzarella, Goat Cheese and Truffle Oil
http://66.102.9.104/search?q=cache:1FQnVVnS9wIJ:www.brickhou...

Melted Shallots


20ea large shallots, cut in half vertically
1 # unsalted butter

Place the shallots in a half hotel pan with the butter. Cover with foil and bake @225F until very tender, about 5 hrs.
http://www.rainwaterrestaurant.com/Recipes/restaurant_recipe...
Selected response from:

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 03:51
Grading comment
Shallots. As Cindy put it first (albeit as a second thought) she must take the points, but I thank you too desertfox, for that precise answer and interesting explanation of the etymology of the term. Thanks to you both. Enjoy the rest of your weekend. :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5Shallot
Gad Kohenov
4 +4scallion / spring onionxxxtazdog


  

Answers


26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
scallion / spring onion


Explanation:
AFAIK, that's what these are (spellings vary). Not sure how they plan on getting them "fundidas"...

http://books.google.es/books?id=_W8BAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA280&lpg=PA...

A scallion, also commonly known as spring onion or green onion, is associated with various members of the genus Allium that lack a fully-developed bulb.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scallion

Escalona, Escalunya o Escaluña: variedad de cebolla que no hace llorar
http://foroantiguo.infojardin.com/showthread.php?t=161235

Es común una variante del cultivo de la cebolla, a la que se denomina cebolla o cebolleta escalona, con el cual se aprovechan las cebollas en las que ha comenzado a brotar el tallo (y empeoran, por tanto, sus propiedades organolépticas).
www.cifaed.es/downloader.php?path=archivos/publicaciones/&n...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 32 mins (2008-04-26 18:49:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Now I've just found this, which seems to point more towards "shallot":

La chalote o escaloña es una pequeña cebolla pero con “dientes” como los ajos. Se trata de Allium cepa, variedad ascolonicum. Se consume cocida o troceada y frita. Procede de Asia menor.
Las mismas plagas y enfermedades que la cebolla.
http://www.mercasa.es/nueva/revista/pdf76/enciclopedia.pdf

And this:

La chalota, echalote o ***escalonia*** es una verdura de la familia de las aliáceas. Podemos situar su origen en Asia central. Su nombre procede de Ascalón ciudad de Israel donde se cultivaba.
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_ascalonicum

Which links to:

The term Shallot is used to describe two different Allium species of plant. The French grey shallot or griselle, which has been considered to be the "true shallot" by many, is Allium oschaninii, a species that grows wild from Central to Southwest Asia. Other varieties of shallot are Allium cepa var. aggregatum (multiplier onions), also known as A. ascalonicum.[citation needed]

This ambiguity is further confused by confusion with scallions, also known as spring or green onions. In some countries green onions are called shallots, and shallots are referred to by alternative names such as eschallot or eschalotte.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shallot


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 36 mins (2008-04-26 18:53:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK...so "melted shallots" does, apparently, exist (go figure):

SANDWICHES

Melted Cheese and Onion French Baguette with Oven-Dried Tomato, Melted Shallots, Cucumber and Arugula Salad
http://www.ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/BeijingFinancialStr...

Grilled Pizza – Sauteed Cremini Mushrooms, Melted Shallots, Smoked Bacon, Mozzarella, Goat Cheese and Truffle Oil
http://66.102.9.104/search?q=cache:1FQnVVnS9wIJ:www.brickhou...

Melted Shallots


20ea large shallots, cut in half vertically
1 # unsalted butter

Place the shallots in a half hotel pan with the butter. Cover with foil and bake @225F until very tender, about 5 hrs.
http://www.rainwaterrestaurant.com/Recipes/restaurant_recipe...

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 03:51
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 212
Grading comment
Shallots. As Cindy put it first (albeit as a second thought) she must take the points, but I thank you too desertfox, for that precise answer and interesting explanation of the etymology of the term. Thanks to you both. Enjoy the rest of your weekend. :)
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Cindy! And special thanks to Liz who emailed through too. "Melted shallots"! It´s rather flowery isn´t it! But completely correct, as far as I can tell from all your helpful references everyone! :)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  karcsy: scallion or otherwise known as shallots. There are a lot of melted shallot recipes.
8 mins
  -> thanks, I had never heard of melted shallots before but now I see that there are, indeed, quite a few refs. to them

agree  liz askew: Shallot. I sent this to Kate privately, as I couldn't do this via Proz earlier, for some unknown reason.
35 mins
  -> yes, shallot does appear more likely

agree  Terry Burgess: No question about it! Nice to see you after so long, Cindy:-)) Muchos salu2!
1 hr
  -> hi Terry...where've you been all this time?

agree  Ana Roca
2 hrs
  -> thanks, Ana

disagree  Daniel Parra: Cindy, I don't like to use the disagree, but the "escaloña" is not a spring onion nor a scallion.
2 hrs
  -> Scallion was what my initial research led me to, but I found the better refs. to "shallot" a few minutes later, and posted them...well before the other answer. Did you not read what I posted before disagreeing?

agree  Rachel Fell: shallot - ref as per DF and: abbrev'd. Alan Davidson History of Food: 300 BC Theophrastus called shallot askolonion...scallion... >shallot, spring onion (esp. USA), et al
3 hrs
  -> thanks, Rachel

agree  PB Trans: shallot
3 hrs
  -> thanks, Pina

disagree  Oscar Medina: escaloña = ascaluña = echalote = echalot = chalote (Allium cepa var. Aggregatum): shallot.
1 day8 hrs
  -> what, another person who didn't bother to read my whole answer (or the asker's comments, for that matter)? see my response to Daniel Parra, above.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Shallot


Explanation:
דפדף

shallot
s. cebolla escalonia, cebollino, cebolleta, chalote
The name comes from the Israeli city of Ashqelon of Ascalon 14 km North of Aza.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2008-04-26 20:50:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Aza is of course Gaza.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2008-04-26 20:52:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As schevallier mentions in French its echalote.

Gad Kohenov
Israel
Local time: 04:51
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in HebrewHebrew

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  psicutrinius
4 mins
  -> !mil gracias!

agree  schevallier: absolutely right: "fondue d'échalote" in this case
1 hr
  -> !Mil gracias!

agree  Daniel Parra: Yes, we use the "escaloña" often; we buy them right across the border in France where they're called "'échalotes".
2 hrs
  -> !mil gracias!

agree  Rosina Peixoto
2 hrs
  -> !Mil gracias!

agree  Rachel Fell: http://www.theworldwidegourmet.com/?action=recette_show&id=1...
2 hrs
  -> Much obliged!
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