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flan

English translation: flan

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:flan
English translation:flan
Entered by: Sandra Alboum
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23:59 Mar 28, 2004
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
Spanish term or phrase: flan
Es una preparación con leche, huevos, azúcar y una cobertura de azúcar quemada.
¿Egg custard o creme caramel?
Muchas gracias
DanielaRLo
Local time: 15:22
flan
Explanation:
Leave it as such. Even Vietnamese restaurants now serve "flan" !!
Selected response from:

Sandra Alboum
United States
Local time: 14:22
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +15flan
Sandra Alboum
4 +13creme caramel
Jackie Bowman
5creme caramel/caramel custardjfrb
4 +1pudding
swisstell


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +15
flan


Explanation:
Leave it as such. Even Vietnamese restaurants now serve "flan" !!


Sandra Alboum
United States
Local time: 14:22
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 34

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxx-Translator
12 mins
  -> Thanks.

agree  Luisa Ramos, CT: Agree. But, if anything, it would be custard.
21 mins
  -> I guess, but flan is so much more than just simple custard :-)

agree  Henry Hinds
1 hr
  -> Thank you!

agree  Paul Weideman: I agree, leave it.
1 hr
  -> Yes, thanks.

agree  Trudy Peters: or crème brulée - depending on the restaurant :-)
1 hr
  -> Thanks!

agree  Sol: Yes, it might be a kind of custard, but it is "flan".
2 hrs
  -> Thank you.

neutral  Sandy T: I would leave it between brackets. Eventhough, many people may know what it is, the spanish word is not used everywhere...
3 hrs
  -> I put it in italics.

agree  sktrans: check Spanish flan on the Internet
4 hrs
  -> Yummy!

agree  Huijer
6 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  EdithK
6 hrs
  -> Gracias, EdithK.

agree  lincasanova: it is NOT creme brulée!!! just flan
14 hrs
  -> Yes, the French would probably be offended we're comparing flan to creme brulee :-)

agree  Marsha Wilkie
15 hrs
  -> Thanks!

neutral  louisajay: to me (UK English) a flan is something entirely different, almost like a pie or tart. That said, custard is also something very different here... (creme anglaise)
16 hrs
  -> That's very interesting. I think I would like Spanish flan more than British flan :-)

agree  mbc
16 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  Ivan Costa Pinto
21 hrs
  -> Gracias, Ivan.

agree  Pamela Peralta: Flan, yes
1 day52 mins

agree  Refugio: A flan is a flan is a flan.
1 day6 hrs

neutral  Emma Cox: A flan in England is like a quiche or a tart as Louisajay says!!! Stick to CREME CARAMEL if this is for a British market, as this is a British "flan" - and mine taste the same as Spanish flan I hasten to add!!!
2 days7 hrs

neutral  Lisa McCarthy: Definitely not 'flan' as we know it in Ireland or the UK, if that's your target audience
2941 days
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
pudding


Explanation:
if you absolutely insist on putting this into English, but FLAN is a rather common designation for custards, puddings and the likes. YOu can categorize it into such specialities as milk flan, caramel flan,
etc.

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 20:22
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ivan Costa Pinto
21 hrs
  -> obrigado, Ivan

agree  Alina Rubiano
1 day2 hrs

disagree  Emma Cox: "pudding" is a generic term and encompasses all postres, including English and Spanish equivalents of flan... so you MUST insist on putting it into English, otherwise a milk flan would sound like baked milk in a pastry case - yuck!
2 days7 hrs
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +13
creme caramel


Explanation:
.

Jackie Bowman
Local time: 14:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rantes
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Peter Haden
4 hrs
  -> Ta!

agree  yeswhere: this is definitely the English equivalent of the 'flan' served in most Spanish restaurants; custard is something else and creme brule is richer with cream
4 hrs
  -> Gracias

agree  Paul Stevens
6 hrs
  -> Obrigada

agree  Sheilann: This is it in Spain.
6 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  aniles: It's definitely creme caramel. Custard does not taste the same, although it is similar.
11 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Maria Lorenzo: Definitely creme caramel
14 hrs
  -> Gracias!

agree  louisajay: yep, most English people know what this is
16 hrs
  -> Cheers.

agree  Ivan Costa Pinto
21 hrs
  -> Thanks, Ivan

agree  neilmac: This is it, my favourite sweet, and anything but an English flan
22 hrs
  -> Ta!

agree  Emma Cox: Definitely...
2 days6 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Mar Brotons
9 days
  -> Thank you

agree  Lisa McCarthy
2941 days
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8 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
creme caramel/caramel custard


Explanation:
Propongo dos términos - uno nuevo - y les doy una explicación larga para todos los traductores comilones sin trabajo. "Creme caramel" está muy bién, y más usada que "caramel custard", pero tal vez le apetezca más algo verdaderamente inglés.

El problema es que si uno va a un restaurante de un país hispanohablante y pide un flan, puede recibir una gran variedad de postres. La palabra "flan" es usada en ciertos lugares en inglés para describir esta cosa de que hablamos, pero en otros lugares, se comprende como algo muy diferente. Digamos que "flan" no es la traducción de la palabra española "flan", pero que hoy en dia ALGUNA gente la entiende. Acá en Inglaterra, la mayoría de la gente no la entendería. Echa una ojeada a esta página:-

http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/flan.htm

Esta página contiene una discusión sobre una pregunta parecida, pero la mejor página es la de abajo. Tiene fotos y recetas!

http://webfoodpros.com/wwwboard/bd/messages/1701.html

(Por cierto, la crema catalan contiene alimidón de maíz y creme brulee se hace de crema y no leche. Las dos tienen una cobertura caramelizada.)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 days (2004-04-06 16:27:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Unas referencias a \"caramel custard\":-
México (flan = caramel custard):
http://www.globalgourmet.com/destinations/ mexico/caracust.html
Panamá (flan de caramelo = caramel custard):
http://expedition.bensenville.lib.il.us/CentralAmerica/ Panama/recipes/FlandeCaramelo.htm


    Reference: http://www.meilleurduchef.com/cgi/mdc/l/en/recettes/creme_de...
jfrb
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:22
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
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