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maestro nacional de educación física vs. profesor nacional de educación física

English translation: National Diploma in Physical Education (primary/elementary) vs. Higher National Diploma in Phys. Ed.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:maestro nacional de educación física vs. profesor nacional de educación física
English translation:National Diploma in Physical Education (primary/elementary) vs. Higher National Diploma in Phys. Ed.
Entered by: Charles Davis
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00:17 Sep 30, 2012
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Education / Pedagogy / analítico
Spanish term or phrase: maestro nacional de educación física vs. profesor nacional de educación física
Estoy traduciendo el analítico de un licenciado en educación física de Argentina. En el analítico figuran los títulos anteriores.
Cómo puedo hacer la diferencia entre "maestro nacional de educación física" y "profesor nacional de educación física"
Ambos títulos fueron obtenidos en un instituto terciario.
rominadiaz
National Diploma in Physical Education (primary/elementary) vs. Higher National Diploma in Phys. Ed.
Explanation:
There wasn't enough room in the box to write "Physical Education" in full at the end, but I would do so, rather than abbreviating it.

I would use these terms, on the following grounds:

In Argentina, as in Spain, "maestro" is a primary or elementary teacher and "profesor" is a secondary or high school teacher. "Profesor" is also, of course, a teacher in higher education, but that's not relevant here.

We need to see what kind of qualifications these terms denote in Argentina. Lorena has cited a useful source on this. The key points are:

1) These are the names of qualifications. As often happens in Spanish, they refer to the person who holds the qualification ("maestro", "profesor"), whereas in English it is normal to refer to the qualification itself ("degree", "diploma", "certificate", or whatever).

2) These are NON-UNIVERSITY qualifications, so I don't think it's correct to call them degrees. They are awarded by Institutes of Physical Education. Argentine universities award higher qualifications, normally called "Licenciado en Educación Física" or something similar. These are degrees. Sometimes people who have obtained a MNEF and PNEF at an Institute go on to do a Licenciatura at a university. Here's an example:
http://www.alejandrokohan.com/staff/pablo-dolce.pdf

3) Maestro Nacional is a three-year course which (as the name implies) qualifies you to teach physical education at primary level (elementary, as you would call it in the US). It is awarded when you have complete the primer ciclo (3 years). Profesor Nacional is a four-year course, involving a further segundo ciclo (1 year) and entitles you to teach physical education at all school levels:

"1.5 Ciclos y duración de la carrera:
a) Primer ciclo: tres años
b) Segundo ciclo: un año
1.6 Títulos que ofrece la carrera:
a) Al aprobar el primer ciclo: Maestro Nacional de Educación Física
b) Al aprobar el segundo ciclo: Profesor Nacional de Educación Física
1.7 Habilitación de los títulos:
Maestro Nacional de Educación Física:
- Docente para el nivel primario
- Habilitante para el nivel medio
Profesor Nacional de Educación Física:
- Docente para todos los niveles."
http://www.danielpallarola.com.ar/archivos/Decreto_926_80.pd...

In some cases they are two years and three years respectively.

I would use the word "diploma", which would be standard for this kind of qualification in the UK and a number of other countries, and I think would work also in the US, by analogy with the Diploma in Nursing, for example. I would add "primary", or "elementary" for the US, after the "Maestro" qualification, and use the word "Higher" for the "Profesor", to show that it is not just an alternative curriculum but involves further study.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 02:39
Grading comment
Thank you, Charles.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1National Diploma in Physical Education (primary/elementary) vs. Higher National Diploma in Phys. Ed.
Charles Davis
4PE teacher/instructor at national primary and secondary level
neilmac


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
PE teacher/instructor at national primary and secondary level


Explanation:
I think something like this would be understood on either side of the Atlantic.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2012-09-30 08:26:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I believe the common abbreviation in the USA is Phys. Ed.
http://education-portal.com/articles/Physical_Education_Teac...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2012-09-30 08:27:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Wikipedia:
"Physical education (often abbreviated Phys. Ed. or P.E.) or gymnastics (gym or gym class) is a course taken during primary and secondary education that encourages psychomotor learning in a play or movement exploration setting."

neilmac
Spain
Local time: 02:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 224
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
National Diploma in Physical Education (primary/elementary) vs. Higher National Diploma in Phys. Ed.


Explanation:
There wasn't enough room in the box to write "Physical Education" in full at the end, but I would do so, rather than abbreviating it.

I would use these terms, on the following grounds:

In Argentina, as in Spain, "maestro" is a primary or elementary teacher and "profesor" is a secondary or high school teacher. "Profesor" is also, of course, a teacher in higher education, but that's not relevant here.

We need to see what kind of qualifications these terms denote in Argentina. Lorena has cited a useful source on this. The key points are:

1) These are the names of qualifications. As often happens in Spanish, they refer to the person who holds the qualification ("maestro", "profesor"), whereas in English it is normal to refer to the qualification itself ("degree", "diploma", "certificate", or whatever).

2) These are NON-UNIVERSITY qualifications, so I don't think it's correct to call them degrees. They are awarded by Institutes of Physical Education. Argentine universities award higher qualifications, normally called "Licenciado en Educación Física" or something similar. These are degrees. Sometimes people who have obtained a MNEF and PNEF at an Institute go on to do a Licenciatura at a university. Here's an example:
http://www.alejandrokohan.com/staff/pablo-dolce.pdf

3) Maestro Nacional is a three-year course which (as the name implies) qualifies you to teach physical education at primary level (elementary, as you would call it in the US). It is awarded when you have complete the primer ciclo (3 years). Profesor Nacional is a four-year course, involving a further segundo ciclo (1 year) and entitles you to teach physical education at all school levels:

"1.5 Ciclos y duración de la carrera:
a) Primer ciclo: tres años
b) Segundo ciclo: un año
1.6 Títulos que ofrece la carrera:
a) Al aprobar el primer ciclo: Maestro Nacional de Educación Física
b) Al aprobar el segundo ciclo: Profesor Nacional de Educación Física
1.7 Habilitación de los títulos:
Maestro Nacional de Educación Física:
- Docente para el nivel primario
- Habilitante para el nivel medio
Profesor Nacional de Educación Física:
- Docente para todos los niveles."
http://www.danielpallarola.com.ar/archivos/Decreto_926_80.pd...

In some cases they are two years and three years respectively.

I would use the word "diploma", which would be standard for this kind of qualification in the UK and a number of other countries, and I think would work also in the US, by analogy with the Diploma in Nursing, for example. I would add "primary", or "elementary" for the US, after the "Maestro" qualification, and use the word "Higher" for the "Profesor", to show that it is not just an alternative curriculum but involves further study.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 02:39
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 404
Grading comment
Thank you, Charles.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  neilmac: ... with all your comments. These are the names of the qualifications; am not sure if that's what the asker wants for the CV though... ;)
5 hrs
  -> Not sure either, but should be OK for a CV. You can always do something like "holder of" or "holds a", if necessary. Many thanks, Neil ;)
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Changes made by editors
Jan 2, 2013 - Changes made by Charles Davis:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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