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ta te ti, suerte para ti...

English translation: eeny, meeny, miny, moe...

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:ta te ti, suerte para ti...
English translation:eeny, meeny, miny, moe...
Entered by: xxxOso
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23:26 Aug 17, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Folklore
Spanish term or phrase: ta te ti, suerte para ti...
es un cantito que en Argentina usamos para elegir a alguien al azar en un grupo de gente... Cantamos eso a medida que vamos señalando a los integrantes del grupo...
Hay algún equivalente en inglés?
Gracias!
Gabriela Rodriguez
Argentina
Local time: 08:51
Eenie, Meenie, Mini, Mo
Explanation:
Una idea,
Oso ¶:^)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-08-17 23:37:05 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Eeny, meeny, miny, moe or eeny, meenie, minie, moe is a children\'s counting rhyme, used to select \"it\" in games and similar purposes. The rhyme has been around in various forms since the 1850s or earlier. Some historians have associated the words \"eenie meeny miny moe\" with Celtic Druid counting words. Since many similar counting rhymes existed earlier and since that time, it is difficult to ascertain the exact origin of the modern rhyme.

Today the most common version goes:

Eeny, meeny, miny, moe
Catch a tiger by the toe
If he hollers let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe


(\"It\" is often substituted for \"he\".)

Many alternative verses appear with this rhyme, especially after the third line. These verses are used by children when picking a person for an activity by pointing to a different person in the group at each word or syllable in the rhyme, until the last syllable, at which point the pointed-to person is either chosen or out, depending on the version. Sometimes an extra line is added at the end of the rhyme to draw out the selection process: \"My mother says that you are IT!\", or a variation of it.

Other variations on the second verse include:

My mother told me
To pick the very best one
And you are [not] it.


or

Out goes one
Out goes two
Out goes another one
And that is you.

Although many stories exist about the \"real\" meaning of the first line, they are apparently just nonsense syllables. The earliest known published versions in the English language date to 1855, one of which used the words eeny, meeny, moany, mite and the other hana, mana, mona, mike. Other versions have also appeared in both Britain and America, as well as in several other European languages. Some claim, though with little evidence, that the words are derived from a chant used by Celtic druids in order to choose sacrificial victims.

A controversial alternative version of this poem substitutes the word nigger for the word tiger, which in some eyes has tainted the entire rhyme. Some believe that the modern version is a politically correct version of the \"nigger\" version, but there is no clear supporting evidence. No versions are known to predate the oldest examples of \"tiger\" versions. It is also doubtful that the \"nigger\" version would have mutated into the \"tiger\" version in an era when political correctness was not an issue, or that it would have caught on so widely with few variations of similar popularity.

Residents of the southern United States, especially those who grew up before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 are more likely to report having heard or grown up with the \"nigger\" version of the rhyme, while many others have never heard that version and were not aware of its existence. There is no clear evidence of how many people are familiar with it, but most people who grew up since the 1960s have been taught the \"tiger\" version.\"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eenie_Meenie



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-08-17 23:40:02 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Disculpa, arriba le debí haber escrito así: ***Eeny, meeny, miny, moe***

Sorry ¶:^S

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-08-17 23:51:33 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sólo como Fun Fact te comparto que la versión que usamos en México (y por el comentario de MariTere veo que también en Panamá) es:

\"De tín marín, de do pingüé, cúcara, mácara, títere fue, yo no fui, fue Teté, pégale, pégale que ella fue.\" ¶:^)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-08-17 23:57:24 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Otras rimas infantiles para contar (ya me piqué) ¶;^)

\"Counting Out Rhymes

The person who \"counts out\" points to each person in the group as he or she recites the rhyme, one person per word, going around the group as many times as necessary to complete the rhyme. The person pointed to on the last word is the chosen person or \"it.\"

Eny, meny, mony, mite
Butter, lather, boney, strike,
Hair cut, froth neck,
Halico balico,
We, wo, wack.

As I went up the apple-tree,
All the apples fell on me;
Bake a pudding, bake a pie,
Did you ever tell a lie?
Yes, you did, you know you did,
You broke your mother\'s teapot-lid—
L-i-d, that spells lid.

Onery, uery, ickory, Ann,
Fillison, follason, Nicholas John,
Queevy, quavy, English navy,
Stinkalum, stankalum, John Buck.
B-u-c-k spells buck.

Enna, mena, mina, mo,
Catch a rabbit by the toe;
If he hollers, let him go,
Ena mena mina mo!

Monkey, monkey, bottle of beer;
How many monkeys are there here?
One, two, three, out goes he (or she)! \"

http://www.sos.state.mi.us/history/museum/musefaye/games.htm...
Selected response from:

xxxOso
Grading comment
muchas gracias a todos!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +16Eenie, Meenie, Mini, MoxxxOso
5my mother and your mother...
Lynda Tharratt
5tic-tac-toe (AmE), noughts and crosses (BrE)
María T. Vargas


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +16
Eenie, Meenie, Mini, Mo


Explanation:
Una idea,
Oso ¶:^)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-08-17 23:37:05 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Eeny, meeny, miny, moe or eeny, meenie, minie, moe is a children\'s counting rhyme, used to select \"it\" in games and similar purposes. The rhyme has been around in various forms since the 1850s or earlier. Some historians have associated the words \"eenie meeny miny moe\" with Celtic Druid counting words. Since many similar counting rhymes existed earlier and since that time, it is difficult to ascertain the exact origin of the modern rhyme.

Today the most common version goes:

Eeny, meeny, miny, moe
Catch a tiger by the toe
If he hollers let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe


(\"It\" is often substituted for \"he\".)

Many alternative verses appear with this rhyme, especially after the third line. These verses are used by children when picking a person for an activity by pointing to a different person in the group at each word or syllable in the rhyme, until the last syllable, at which point the pointed-to person is either chosen or out, depending on the version. Sometimes an extra line is added at the end of the rhyme to draw out the selection process: \"My mother says that you are IT!\", or a variation of it.

Other variations on the second verse include:

My mother told me
To pick the very best one
And you are [not] it.


or

Out goes one
Out goes two
Out goes another one
And that is you.

Although many stories exist about the \"real\" meaning of the first line, they are apparently just nonsense syllables. The earliest known published versions in the English language date to 1855, one of which used the words eeny, meeny, moany, mite and the other hana, mana, mona, mike. Other versions have also appeared in both Britain and America, as well as in several other European languages. Some claim, though with little evidence, that the words are derived from a chant used by Celtic druids in order to choose sacrificial victims.

A controversial alternative version of this poem substitutes the word nigger for the word tiger, which in some eyes has tainted the entire rhyme. Some believe that the modern version is a politically correct version of the \"nigger\" version, but there is no clear supporting evidence. No versions are known to predate the oldest examples of \"tiger\" versions. It is also doubtful that the \"nigger\" version would have mutated into the \"tiger\" version in an era when political correctness was not an issue, or that it would have caught on so widely with few variations of similar popularity.

Residents of the southern United States, especially those who grew up before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 are more likely to report having heard or grown up with the \"nigger\" version of the rhyme, while many others have never heard that version and were not aware of its existence. There is no clear evidence of how many people are familiar with it, but most people who grew up since the 1960s have been taught the \"tiger\" version.\"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eenie_Meenie



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-08-17 23:40:02 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Disculpa, arriba le debí haber escrito así: ***Eeny, meeny, miny, moe***

Sorry ¶:^S

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-08-17 23:51:33 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sólo como Fun Fact te comparto que la versión que usamos en México (y por el comentario de MariTere veo que también en Panamá) es:

\"De tín marín, de do pingüé, cúcara, mácara, títere fue, yo no fui, fue Teté, pégale, pégale que ella fue.\" ¶:^)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-08-17 23:57:24 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Otras rimas infantiles para contar (ya me piqué) ¶;^)

\"Counting Out Rhymes

The person who \"counts out\" points to each person in the group as he or she recites the rhyme, one person per word, going around the group as many times as necessary to complete the rhyme. The person pointed to on the last word is the chosen person or \"it.\"

Eny, meny, mony, mite
Butter, lather, boney, strike,
Hair cut, froth neck,
Halico balico,
We, wo, wack.

As I went up the apple-tree,
All the apples fell on me;
Bake a pudding, bake a pie,
Did you ever tell a lie?
Yes, you did, you know you did,
You broke your mother\'s teapot-lid—
L-i-d, that spells lid.

Onery, uery, ickory, Ann,
Fillison, follason, Nicholas John,
Queevy, quavy, English navy,
Stinkalum, stankalum, John Buck.
B-u-c-k spells buck.

Enna, mena, mina, mo,
Catch a rabbit by the toe;
If he hollers, let him go,
Ena mena mina mo!

Monkey, monkey, bottle of beer;
How many monkeys are there here?
One, two, three, out goes he (or she)! \"

http://www.sos.state.mi.us/history/museum/musefaye/games.htm...

xxxOso
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
muchas gracias a todos!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  colemh: sin lugar a dudas
7 mins
  -> Muy amable, Colemh ¡Muchas gracias! Aunque debí escribir: "Eeny, meeny, miny, moe" ¶8^)

agree  MargaEsther: Tu rigor me deslumbra y la información me apasiona. O sea que significa lo mismo que de tin, marín de do pingüé.
8 mins
  -> Hola Marga, te agradezco de corazón. Sí, nuestro famoso "de tín, marín de do pingüé, cúcara, mácara, títere fue, yo no fui, fui Teté, pégale, pégale que ella fue"! ¶:^))))

agree  María Teresa Taylor Oliver: Eso, eso, Oso, Oso. Tin marín de dos pingüé <;-P || Híjole, no me acordaba del resto por más que lo intenté :P y siempre pensé que era "DOS pingüé" jajaja Ahora quiero saber de donde salió eso.
10 mins
  -> Hola MariTere, gracias mil; me alegra mucho que compartamos este recuerdo infantil: "de tín, marín, de do pingüé, cúcara, mácara, títere fue, yo no fui, fui Teté, pégale, pégale que ella fue" ¶:^D

agree  Marijke Singer: My daughter does this regularly with her friends (UK): the tiger version!
11 mins
  -> ¡Mil gracias por el dato y por tu agrí, Marijke! Saludos ¶:^)

agree  Fabiana Yampolsky: Buen trabajo, Oso!
16 mins
  -> ¡Muy amable, Fabiana! Mil gracias ¶:^)

agree  Adriana de Groote: Excelente Osito!
21 mins
  -> Te agradezco mucho, Adriana. Saludos mil ¶:^)

agree  David Hollywood: spot on Monsieur :)
28 mins
  -> Muchisimas gracias, David ¶:^)

agree  Claudia Luque Bedregal: una respuesta completísima! saludos oso!
29 mins
  -> ¡Saludos cordiales, clb! Muchas gracias ¶:^)

agree  Lynda Tharratt: excelente
32 mins
  -> Muy amable, Lynda. Muchas gracias ¶:^)

agree  Elizabeth Lyons: Perfect.
52 mins
  -> Saludos y muchas gracias, Elizabeth ¶:^)

agree  Luis Rey Ballesteros (Luiroi): ¡¡¡Sehr gut, herr Bear!!!
53 mins
  -> Dankeschön, Lui! ¶:^)

agree  teju: Claro que si
1 hr
  -> Muchas gracias y saludos, teju ¶:^)

agree  milliecoquis: agree oso si!
1 hr
  -> Muchísimas gracias, milliecoquis ¶:^)

agree  Ismael Torres
2 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias, Ismael ¶:^)

agree  zemba: Excelente explicación. I agree!!
3 hrs
  -> ¡Hola zemba! Welcome back! Muchas gracias y un abrazo ¶:^)

agree  Philippe Maillard
8 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias, Phillipe ¶:^)
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
tic-tac-toe (AmE), noughts and crosses (BrE)


Explanation:
En el Oxford Superlex se encuentran los equivalentes en inglés de EE.UJU. y en británico y te lo he copiado. Suerte, y me trajiste muchos recuerdos de mi infancia cordobesa, ahora que vivo en España hace 30 años.

María T. Vargas
Spain
Local time: 13:51
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
my mother and your mother...


Explanation:
Just for the sake of it...

<<My mother and your mother were out hanging clothes, my mother punched your mother right in the nose, what colour was the blood?>> Second Child: <<orange>> (for example) First Child (indicating a group member with each letter and then each word) : O - R - A - N - G - E , and that spells orange! The person with "orange" was "it".

Gee, I haven't even thought about that in a long time. Thanks for the memories!

Lynda Tharratt
Local time: 07:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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Changes made by editors
Aug 19, 2005 - Changes made by xxxOso:
FieldOther » Art/Literary
Field (specific)Other » Folklore


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