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pido gancho, el que me toca es un chancho!

English translation: Time Out

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:pido gancho, el que me toca es un chancho!
English translation:Time Out
Entered by: Rafa Lombardino
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16:20 May 18, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Spanish term or phrase: pido gancho, el que me toca es un chancho!
Hola, gentes queridas, soy yo de nuevo. Me encantaron sus sugerencias para "qué te importa". necesito sus cerebros nuevamente. Un equivalente para esta frase, que se usa en Argentina cuando estás jugando a algo y quieres salir del juego por un rato, y no te pueden tocar ni atrapar por ese ratito. Ejemplo, jugar a la mancha y decir "pido gancho" para parar el juego y explicar algo o cuando se juega a las escondidas y se sale del escondite por alguna urgencia o porque sucedió algo y se tiene que parar el juego. GRACIAS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! in case you're wondering de donde sale todo esto, es una traducción de una obra de teatro infantil.
Desdemona
Local time: 18:15
time out
Explanation:
Time Out

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Note added at 3 mins (2005-05-18 16:24:28 GMT)
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Alternative: \"I need a break! I\'m not playing anymore! I\'m off the hook\"

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Note added at 7 mins (2005-05-18 16:28:33 GMT)
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\"Time Out\"
Main Entry: time-out
Pronunciation: \'tIm-\'aut
Function: noun
: a brief suspension of activity : BREAK; especially : a suspension of play in an athletic game
http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dicti...
Selected response from:

Rafa Lombardino
United States
Local time: 14:15
Grading comment
thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4time out
Rafa Lombardino
4jinxRefugio
3time out!
Rebecca Hendry


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
time out!


Explanation:
This is what they tend to say in some sports like basketball. I've heard kids use it too.

Rebecca Hendry
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 80
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
time out


Explanation:
Time Out

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 mins (2005-05-18 16:24:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Alternative: \"I need a break! I\'m not playing anymore! I\'m off the hook\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2005-05-18 16:28:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Time Out\"
Main Entry: time-out
Pronunciation: \'tIm-\'aut
Function: noun
: a brief suspension of activity : BREAK; especially : a suspension of play in an athletic game
http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dicti...

Rafa Lombardino
United States
Local time: 14:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Miguel Falquez-Certain
3 mins
  -> ¡Gracias, Nigelguy!

agree  María Teresa Taylor Oliver
9 mins
  -> ¡Gracias, Maria Teresa!

agree  rguerra
46 mins
  -> ¡Gracias RGuerra!

agree  xxxBAmary: Sí, y pido aguja, el que me toca es una bruja!!!/ En Argentina: el último es cola de perro!
55 mins
  -> ¡Gracias BAmary! --> Que entretenido esto de la bruja, ¡que yo no conocía! En Brasil decimos algo parecido cuando niños se ponen a competir, corriendo a toda prisa: "¡Quién llegue por último será la novia del sacerdote!"

neutral  sbrowne: Pero 'el último es cola de perro' no se aplica acá; se usa para ver quién llega 1° . Quiero decir que estoy de acuerdo con 'time out', pero no con 'el último es cola de perro' porque no corresponde al contexto.
2 hrs
  -> The thing is that if I try to imagine kids playing, I can only see them saying "Time out! My Mom is calling" or "Time out! I gotta go to the bathroom" or something like that. I can't think of a childish saying as "I'm rubber, you're glue" for the context
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44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
jinx


Explanation:
I don't know whether children still say this, but in the mid-twentiteth century the word was like a magic charm to protect you temporarily from getting tagged, etc.

Refugio
Local time: 14:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 64

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Rafa Lombardino: As far as I'm concerned, the saying is a kind of a jinx, something like "if you touch me you'll become a pig", but I'm not sure kids would say "Jinx!" to ask for "time out" during a game...
31 mins
  -> Kids did say "Jinx!" as an exact equivalent to the phrase asked. I already stated that I am not sure they still do, since "Jinx!", at least in California, now is said when two people say the same thing at the same time.
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