KudoZ home » Spanish to English » General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters

taca, taca, taca de la alarma

English translation: wee-oo, wee-oo-wee-oo (from the alarm)

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:taca, taca, taca (de la alarma)
English translation:wee-oo, wee-oo-wee-oo (from the alarm)
Entered by: Michael Powers (PhD)
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

20:04 Jul 5, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Spanish term or phrase: taca, taca, taca de la alarma
Pero vamos, sube para arriba, parquéate atrás de mí, no hay nadie aquí.

Mira, la comida, eh, tú, (UI) pero la cogí.

Dame un pedacito ahí.

¿Qué pasó? La vieja no te dejó coger el carro, ¿no?

(UI), ¿no sentiste el taca, taca, taca de la alarma?

No.
Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 20:59
the clang, clang, clang of the alarm (onomatopoeia)
Explanation:



Onomatopoeia (also spelled onomatopœia, from Greek ονοματοποιία) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "bunk", "clang," "buzz," "bang," or animal noises such as "oink", "slurp", or "meow".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onomatopoeia
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-07-05 22:02:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------




Onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:
[edit]Bird singing
In Brazilian Portuguese, piu-piu
In Catalan, piu piu
In Czech, píp píp /peep, peep/
In Dutch, twiet twiet, "pok pok pok" (hen(chicken))
In English, chirp chirp, tweet
In Finnish, tviit, piip piip, ti-pi-tii, ti-ti-tyy (Great Tit)
In French, cui, cui
In German, tschiwitt
In Polish, ćwir ćwir
In Portuguese, piu piu
In Sinhalese, kumu kumu (කුමු-කුමු)
In Spanish, pío, pío
In Filipino, twitwittwit
In Turkish, cik cik /dʒik dʒik/
In Russian, chirik chirik (чирик, чирик)
In Italian, cip cip, pio pio (for chicks)
[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onomatopoeia
Selected response from:

mikellys
United States
Grading comment
I agree with Juliana Starkman's suggestion to Heidi - I can hear the alarm squaling these sounds. - Mike :)
1 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +9the clang, clang, clang of the alarm (onomatopoeia)mikellys
3 +4the alarm beep beep beep
Heidi C
3 +1tock, tock, tock of the alarm
Robin Levey
4tick, tick, tick or ring, ring, ringMónica Sauza


Discussion entries: 14





  

Answers


24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
the alarm beep beep beep


Explanation:
or the
car alarm´s beep beep beep

Heidi C
Local time: 20:59
Meets criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sp-EnTranslator: alarms go off w/ a beep sound- not tock tock nor tick (like a clock) nor ring (telephone) nor clang clang (?)
2 hrs
  -> I think so too... Thanks Claudia :)

agree  Ana Cizmich
18 hrs
  -> Thanks :)

agree  Heather Oland: Beep seems most appropriate for an alarm.
19 hrs
  -> Thanks Heather :)

agree  Juliana Brown: Alarms in English go beep beep or wee-oo wee-oo, bells go clang clang
20 hrs
  -> I love the wee-oo... That would be a u-ah in Spanish, I think. (those obnoxious things that go on all night) Thanks Juliana! :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
tock, tock, tock of the alarm


Explanation:
"taca, taca, taca" is typically used to denote the sound made by a machine gun. It's neither a 'gong', nor a 'beep' ... it's a 'tock'.

Prescribe my sick, sick computer. | Ask Metafilter"Tock!" "Tock!" "Tock!" There are reasons this will happen on occasion, the biggest one being thermal recalibration as the drive warms up. ...
ask.metafilter.com/50591/Prescribe-my-sick-sick-computer - 21k - Cached - Similar pages

WoW Forums -> Post Search24 Jun 2008 ... 06/28/2008 10:20:45 PM PDT by Zerahei search Guild: Wild Blades Realm: Blackrock. Tick tock tick tock tick tock tock tock tock tock.... tock ...
forums.worldofwarcraft.com/search.html;jsessionid=01F389F190C96271B0EDD5730067AA2E.app11_07?characterId=3... - 91k - Cached - Similar pages

Ghost storiesExactly at midnight, he was woken once again by an ever nearing Tock-Tock-Tock- noise. The footsteps became closer and closer and stood still directly in ...
www.youthwork-practice.com/games/ghost-stories.html - 13k - Cached - Similar pages


Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 21:59
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxjacana54: you're right !
39 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
tick, tick, tick or ring, ring, ring


Explanation:
or ring, ring, ring.
Another option, though.

Mónica Sauza
Local time: 19:59
Meets criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 26
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
the clang, clang, clang of the alarm (onomatopoeia)


Explanation:



Onomatopoeia (also spelled onomatopœia, from Greek ονοματοποιία) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "bunk", "clang," "buzz," "bang," or animal noises such as "oink", "slurp", or "meow".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onomatopoeia
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-07-05 22:02:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------




Onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:
[edit]Bird singing
In Brazilian Portuguese, piu-piu
In Catalan, piu piu
In Czech, píp píp /peep, peep/
In Dutch, twiet twiet, "pok pok pok" (hen(chicken))
In English, chirp chirp, tweet
In Finnish, tviit, piip piip, ti-pi-tii, ti-ti-tyy (Great Tit)
In French, cui, cui
In German, tschiwitt
In Polish, ćwir ćwir
In Portuguese, piu piu
In Sinhalese, kumu kumu (කුමු-කුමු)
In Spanish, pío, pío
In Filipino, twitwittwit
In Turkish, cik cik /dʒik dʒik/
In Russian, chirik chirik (чирик, чирик)
In Italian, cip cip, pio pio (for chicks)
[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onomatopoeia


mikellys
United States
Meets criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 5
Grading comment
I agree with Juliana Starkman's suggestion to Heidi - I can hear the alarm squaling these sounds. - Mike :)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nelida Kreer: Yes, why not. Also it could be something like "tick-a-tock" to align it more with the sound of the source text onomatopoeia
11 mins
  -> Thanks Niki-K, and thanks for the suggestion

agree  Enrique Huber
16 mins
  -> Thanks Enrique

agree  Flor M. Vargas: Yeah, that sounds like "clock, clock, clock".
22 mins
  -> Thanks M. Vargas. You know I am always surprised to hear that onomatopoeic sounds have a translation like: chirp chirp, tweet translates as pio, pio, pio. Did they ask the chickens which do they prefer?

agree  Robert Mota
1 hr
  -> Thanks Robert.

agree  Carla_am
1 hr
  -> Thanks Carla

agree  Gerardo Garcia Ramis: "Clang" seems more akin to "taca".
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Gerardo.

agree  Egmont
2 hrs
  -> Thank you AVRVM.

agree  Maru Villanueva
3 hrs
  -> Thank you Maru.

agree  Steven Huddleston: I can't imagine a car alarm that sounds like that, (my ignorance, I admit), but it is onomatopoeic "fer sure".
7 hrs
  -> Thanks Steven
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Jul 11, 2008 - Changes made by Michael Powers (PhD):
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/52429">Michael Powers (PhD)'s</a> old entry - "taca, taca, taca (de la alarma)" » "wee-oo, wee-oo-wee-oo (from the alarm)"


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search