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A no presumir de mozo que el cuero no da para lonjas

English translation: "don't bite off more than you can chew"

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:A no presumir de mozo que el cuero no da para lonjas
English translation:"don't bite off more than you can chew"
Entered by: Richard C. Baca, MIM
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

20:01 Aug 30, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Spanish term or phrase: A no presumir de mozo que el cuero no da para lonjas
Es un texto en español de los años 40. Un médico ve a su paciente que ya está casi recuperado de una caída al intentar hacer algo audaz y le dice que cuando se levante de la cama se tome las cosas con calma. "Y recuerde: A no presumir de mozo que el cuero no da para lonjas".
Tengo que encontrar un dicho en inglés que represente esa idea, algo como "Que no se haga el valiente porque..."
Liliana Garfunkel
Argentina
Local time: 04:57
"don't bite off more than you can chew"
Explanation:
Un dicho en ingles que equivale.
Selected response from:

Richard C. Baca, MIM
Mexico
Local time: 01:57
Grading comment
Gracias, R.C.!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4"don't bite off more than you can chew"
Richard C. Baca, MIM
4 +2take it easy and don't go gadding about/aroundBubo Coromandus
4you're no spring chicken anymore.trans4u


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
"don't bite off more than you can chew"


Explanation:
Un dicho en ingles que equivale.

Richard C. Baca, MIM
Mexico
Local time: 01:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Gracias, R.C.!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lydia De Jorge: Perfecto en el contexto!
6 hrs

agree  franglish
10 hrs

agree  María T. Vargas
13 hrs

agree  Janine Libbey
20 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
take it easy and don't go gadding about/around


Explanation:
ejemplos del uso de "go gadding about":

http://www.google.es/search?hl=es&q="go gadding about"&meta=

otra referencia:

http://www.wordmagicsoft.com/diccionario/en-es/gad about.php

Bubo Coromandus
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 310
Notes to answerer
Asker: Muchas gracias, Deborah!!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Egmont
2 hrs
  -> thanks Alberto, happy Sunday! :-) Deborah

agree  Marian Martin
17 hrs
  -> thanks Marian, enjoy your Sunday! :-) Deborah
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1 day8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
you're no spring chicken anymore.


Explanation:
another option

be no spring chicken (humorous)
to not be young any more. He must be ten years older than Grace, and she's no spring chicken.
http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/be no spring chicken

SPRING CHICKEN - "We find the expression 'now past a chicken,' meaning 'no longer young,' recorded as early as 1711 by Steele in 'The Spectator': 'You ought to consider you are now past a chicken; this Humour, which was well enough in a Girl, is insufferable in one of your Motherly Character.' 'No spring chicken,' an exaggeration of the phrase, is first recorded in America in 1906." From "Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins" by Robert Hendrickson (Facts on File, New York, 1997).

: : The figurative meaning comes from the literal meaning: a young chicken, having tender meat. Some restaurant menus describe an offering as spring chicken to convince customers that the bird was slaughtered at the peak of perfection. This phrase doesn't seem to be applied to people very often anymore. Middle-aged and elderly women used to say "I'm no spring chicken," meaning they were past young adulthood, when talking about thttp://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/30/messages/1168.ht... attractiveness or their health and energy level.


trans4u
Local time: 01:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 18
Notes to answerer
Asker: Gracias, trans4u! Qué buena tu expresión. Fue muy difícil tener que elegir una.

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Changes made by editors
Sep 1, 2008 - Changes made by Richard C. Baca, MIM:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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