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titulo de faquir

English translation: you need to be a (fully qualified) fakir

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08:36 Aug 11, 2004
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Spanish term or phrase: titulo de faquir
Sentence: Si usted bailar uno de estos temas sin romperse n brazo o una pierna deberia tener el titulo de faquir.

How would you say titulo de faquir in English?
AnkeSR
Spain
Local time: 14:20
English translation:you need to be a (fully qualified) fakir
Explanation:
¡Hi Anke!

This should not be taken literally down to the last word, since it's not how you'd say it in English. Here 'tener título de' in this context means to be qualified and is obviously intended jokingly.

The "título de" is only there for emphasis. You could even leave that part out, since (British) English humour is generally more subtle and doesn't need this type of emphasis to drive the punch line home.

As for faquir, a number of spellings are acceptable: fakir, faquir, fakeer. I am more familiar with the 1st, fakir, but that doesn't mean anything.

Suerte y sonrisas,

Álvaro

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Note added at 1 hr 48 mins (2004-08-11 10:24:58 GMT)
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You\'d have to be (better than need to be)

You\'d have to be a fakir to dance these numbers (without breaking an arm or a leg).

That\'s how I\'d say it. I wouldn\'t even translate the arm and leg bit - as I said, in English these emphases don\'t assist the general humour - on the contrary, not only are they redundant, but they seem to me to be treating the listener as an idiot. This is quite acceptable in Spanish for some reason...

:O)
Selected response from:

moken
Local time: 13:20
Grading comment
Sorry forgot to grade this ques.... I like your comments best! Anke
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3you have earned the right to be called a fakirMargarita Palatnik
5 +2you need to be a (fully qualified) fakir
moken
5dervish/fakeer skills
Alicia Jordá
4the title of fakir
Andrew Vdovin
3YOU COULD CALL YOURSELF A YOGIBaadshah


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
dervish/fakeer skills


Explanation:
I believe the sentence is in figurative sense, as there is no degree to obtain the condition of a dervish/fakeer


Noun 1. fakeer - a Muslim or Hindu mendicant monk who is regarded as a holy man
fakir, faqir, faquir
Islamist, Mohammedan, Moslem, Muhammadan, Muhammedan, Muslim - a believer or follower of Islam
dervish - an ascetic Muslim monk; a member of an order noted for devotional exercises involving bodily movements
holy man, holy person, saint, angel - person of exceptional holiness


    Reference: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/fakeer
Alicia Jordá
Local time: 14:20
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 4
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
you have earned the right to be called a fakir


Explanation:
even though we're perpetuating an incorrect use of the word :-)

fakir , [Arab.,=poverty], in Islam, usually an initiate in a Sufi order. The title fakir is borne with the understanding that poverty is the need to be in relation to God. This term, along with its Persian equivalent, dervish, was extended in Western usage to Indian ascetics and yogis, and incorrectly used generally for itinerant magicians and wonder-workers.

Margarita Palatnik
Local time: 09:20
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  LisaR
18 hrs
  -> thanks :-)

agree  Mijo Schyllert: or to call yourself a fakir?
22 hrs
  -> yes! :-)

agree  cecilia_fraga: yes, could be the proposed option or the one by Miko. Good luck!
1 day17 hrs
  -> yes, thanks Cecia!
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
the title of fakir


Explanation:
the title of fakir

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 mins (2004-08-11 08:42:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or the title of A fakir

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2004-08-11 08:48:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

... The term fakir is from the Arabic word for \'poor man\'. In Islamic cultures
the fakir renounces the material world and follows Allah as a beggar. ...
www.occultopedia.com/f/fakir.htm

Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 19:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
you need to be a (fully qualified) fakir


Explanation:
¡Hi Anke!

This should not be taken literally down to the last word, since it's not how you'd say it in English. Here 'tener título de' in this context means to be qualified and is obviously intended jokingly.

The "título de" is only there for emphasis. You could even leave that part out, since (British) English humour is generally more subtle and doesn't need this type of emphasis to drive the punch line home.

As for faquir, a number of spellings are acceptable: fakir, faquir, fakeer. I am more familiar with the 1st, fakir, but that doesn't mean anything.

Suerte y sonrisas,

Álvaro

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 48 mins (2004-08-11 10:24:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You\'d have to be (better than need to be)

You\'d have to be a fakir to dance these numbers (without breaking an arm or a leg).

That\'s how I\'d say it. I wouldn\'t even translate the arm and leg bit - as I said, in English these emphases don\'t assist the general humour - on the contrary, not only are they redundant, but they seem to me to be treating the listener as an idiot. This is quite acceptable in Spanish for some reason...

:O)

moken
Local time: 13:20
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 51
Grading comment
Sorry forgot to grade this ques.... I like your comments best! Anke

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ma. Fernanda Blesa: Yes, I like "You'd have to be a fakir to dance these numbers" with or without the "arms & legs" bit
2 hrs
  -> ¡Thank you Mª Fernanda! :O) :O)

agree  Mapi: yup, second option better
5 hrs
  -> ¡gracias mapi! :O) :O)
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
YOU COULD CALL YOURSELF A YOGI


Explanation:
YOGI S ARE MORE NOTED FOR THEIR CONTORTION SKILLS THAN FAKIRS

Baadshah
Local time: 14:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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