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norte americano

English translation: American / U.S. citizen

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:norte americano
English translation:American / U.S. citizen
Entered by: garci
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09:53 Nov 1, 2006
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Government / Politics / Puerto Rico
Spanish term or phrase: norte americano
What is a person from the United States called?

The term is commonly used among Spanish speakers to refer to U.S. natives, but that usage tends to irritate other north americans.

I want to hear your suggestions.
Myriam S
United States
Local time: 05:38
American / U.S. citizen
Explanation:
En efecto, para los latinos en general cuando los norteamericanos se designan como "Americans", la respuesta común gira alrededor de que todos los originarios del Continente Americano lo somos: sin embargo, si tu traducción está dirigida hacia los Estados Unidos, es perfectamente entendible ( y valido) utilizar "American"

Por contra, los canadienses no tienen ese prurito de ser llamados americanos, por formar parte del Continente Americano. (A national trait?)

Ojalá te sean útiles mis comentarios
Selected response from:

garci
Local time: 04:38
Grading comment
I was afraid of that answer, but have to accept it. I hope that over time and common usage this usurpation of the continents proper name will be transformed into something more appropriate, such as estadounidenses. Thank you all for your feedback and entertaining comments
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +10American / U.S. citizengarci
5United Statians, Usonians, Usans, Usarians, Ustatians, Unisians, Unitans, (See below)
Ronnie McKee
3 +1GRINGO!!!
Rolando Julio Arciniega


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
American / U.S. citizen


Explanation:
En efecto, para los latinos en general cuando los norteamericanos se designan como "Americans", la respuesta común gira alrededor de que todos los originarios del Continente Americano lo somos: sin embargo, si tu traducción está dirigida hacia los Estados Unidos, es perfectamente entendible ( y valido) utilizar "American"

Por contra, los canadienses no tienen ese prurito de ser llamados americanos, por formar parte del Continente Americano. (A national trait?)

Ojalá te sean útiles mis comentarios

garci
Local time: 04:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 27
Grading comment
I was afraid of that answer, but have to accept it. I hope that over time and common usage this usurpation of the continents proper name will be transformed into something more appropriate, such as estadounidenses. Thank you all for your feedback and entertaining comments

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  neilmac: "... les saludamos con alegria" :-)
36 mins
  -> Hi Neilmac, thanks

agree  Maria Garcia: they call themselves Americans. Y la canción... ¿no era os recibimos con alegría??
41 mins
  -> Yes, it is. Thanks María

agree  Matthew Smith
1 hr
  -> Thanks Matthew

agree  Carol Gullidge: we call them Americans too, in UK
1 hr
  -> Thanks Carol

agree  Laurel Clausen: I can confirm, I myself am an American
1 hr
  -> Thanks Laurel

agree  Ronnie McKee: Yes, we generally say Americans - I think it also comes from the name - United States of America
2 hrs
  -> I guess so. Thanks Ronnie

agree  Davorka Grgic
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Davorka

agree  Patricia Rosas: yes--just encountered this in a translation where the author used norteamericanos interchangeably con "los de los EEUU"
4 hrs
  -> Thanks Patricia

agree  xxxcmwilliams
6 hrs
  -> Thanks cmwilliams

agree  nedra: Americans, definitely. Those of us who live abroad might prefer a workaround, such as "from the (United) States", but this is definitely the adjective.
7 hrs
  -> Thanx Nedra
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
United Statians, Usonians, Usans, Usarians, Ustatians, Unisians, Unitans, (See below)


Explanation:
Valid tongue-in cheek-suggestions:

However, United Statians would surely cause problems in that people from "Los Estados Unidos de Mexico" might become confused with those from "The United States of America". Or, instead of saying Mexicans and Americans would could say "She is a United States of American" or "He is a United States of Mexican". Like the article below says, its a mouthful, but it works.


American
Origin: 1776

When our representatives in General Congress, Assembled, on July 4, 1776, declared "That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be, Free and Independent States," the question immediately arose: What do you call the citizens of the newly named United States of America? Our answer was to shorten that mouthful to its last word and add n, a choice that has vexed our neighbors in Canada and Mexico ever since.

For are not they too Americans? But consider the alternatives. We could be called United Statesians, as Canadian and English writers have suggested. Our own citizens have proposed Usonians, Usans, Usarians, Ustatians, Unisians, Unitans, Fredonians, and Columbians. Columbia, in fact, was a serious possibility for the name of our country; it was already in use in 1775 by the poet Phyllis Wheatley, and it has been a favorite of poetic patriots ever since, as in the song "Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean." That name was taken so seriously that our nation's capital is located in the District of Columbia. But to this day nobody has improved on the flatly descriptive United States of America, and so its people have remained Americans.

The name America had been current ever since a German cartographer, Martin Waldseemüller, named the continent after explorer and navigator Amerigo Vespucci in 1507. Colonists from England, a century later, at first reserved the designation Americans for the original native inhabitants. Soon, however, the descendants of English settlers felt native enough to call themselves Americans, thereby to distinguish themselves from English visitors or immigrants. By 1700, writers on both sides of the Atlantic were discussing what it means to be an American--referring this time to the descendants of those who came from Europe. It remained for the Declaration of Independence to change all Americans from colonists of England to citizens of their own country.


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Ronnie McKee
Spain
Local time: 11:38
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
Notes to answerer
Asker: I enjoyed your comments. I like United Usonians, it has an extraterrestrial tone to it. However, nothing as accurate as the Spanish version, estadounidenses.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Rolando Julio Arciniega: The proper term is: ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS! It's in the Mexican Constitution. A SPANISH google search gives 1,730,000 hits for this term and only 28,400 for "Estados Unidos de Mexico". BTW, Estadounidense is ONE single word. :o)
12 hrs
  -> Excellent, its good to know. We're learning all kinds of things with the problem of what to call an Estado Unidense. I know its one word, I don't know why I wrote it like that..a cross-wired mind.
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
GRINGO!!!


Explanation:
Welll, it IS another option! And lots of United Staterns are familiar with the term!!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 horas (2006-11-02 01:11:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Pues Ronnie, resulta que en realidad es dificil encontrar a cierta luz cuál es la etimología correcta de Gringo. En Google se encuentran varias sugerencias respecto al origen de la palabra, pero parece que nadie "da pie con bola" y todo termina en conjeturas.

Busqué en Google la etimolgía de la palabra en francés y CURIOSAMENTE, una de las explicaciones que encontré ahí es exactamente la misma que me dijeron en la escuela secundaria en México hace como "chorrocientos" años.

Esto es lo que dice:

"Une autre injure, mais basée sur un fait historique, l’occupation du Mexique par les étasuniens. Les uniformes étasuniens étant vert, on leur cria: « Green Go ! », ce qui s’orthographie Gringo en castillan.
A ce jour, lorsque ce n’est pas une injure, Gringo est le nom fort péjoratif qui, dans la bouche d’un Hispanoaméricain désigne les Etasuniens.
Gringo peut désigner les non-hispanique en général, mais ce n’est pas vraiment péjoratif dans ce cas."

Lo que me parece más curioso ( y chistoso!) es que usan la palabra: "étasuniens"

Bueno, aquí están algunos de los lugares que ofrecen varias explicaciones:

http://www.wordorigins.org/wordorg.htm

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=gringo

************
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gringo
In informal Spanish speech, "gringo" offers a convenient shorthand, to refer to a person from the U.S., since the term "American" is used to refer to anyone from the entire American continent (North, Central and South).

The term does lend itself to derogatory, paternalistic or endearing connotations sometimes, depending on the context and the intent of the user.
***********


Rolando Julio Arciniega
Local time: 03:38
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ronnie McKee: But then the French might get irritated as Gringo is made up of a couple of words, combined phoenetically, which referred to French soldiers.
2 hrs
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