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dexa señores (archaic Iberian Spanish)

English translation: leave them being gentlemen

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:dexa señores (archaic Iberian Spanish)
English translation:leave them being gentlemen
Entered by: Miguel Falquez-Certain
Options:
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23:12 Jul 20, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - History / archaic Spanish
Spanish term or phrase: dexa señores (archaic Iberian Spanish)
From a text written by a madrileño on Spain in sixteenth century Italy. The author is quoting from a primary source:

"El marques ... dela Exçelente çibdad E Reyno de napoles muchos años ha no podrá dezir que le ha ydo mal con aquel offiçio, pues que desde alli ha casado e colocado tan bien sus hijos e hijas e todos los **dexa señores** e bien Eredados con titulos e estados grandes"
Patricia Rosas
United States
Local time: 07:24
leave them being gentlemen
Explanation:
An option
Selected response from:

Miguel Falquez-Certain
United States
Local time: 10:24
Grading comment
AH, I SEE THE LIGHT! Thanks to everyone for the comments--I actually didn't understand Nigel's answer until others spoke up. Thanks Nigel!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +12leave them being gentlemen
Miguel Falquez-Certain
5Gentlemen
Brigith Guimarães


  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +12
dexa señores (archaic Iberian Spanish)
leave them being gentlemen


Explanation:
An option

Miguel Falquez-Certain
United States
Local time: 10:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
AH, I SEE THE LIGHT! Thanks to everyone for the comments--I actually didn't understand Nigel's answer until others spoke up. Thanks Nigel!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marina Soldati: Si, se refiere a dejarlos en buena posición (económica y social)
6 mins
  -> Gracias

agree  Juan Jacob: Ahora tiene sentido: los deja como señores...
45 mins
  -> Gracias.

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: like Portuguese ie deixar...I would say "leave-them-be"
46 mins
  -> Gracias

agree  María Teresa Taylor Oliver: I don't envy Patricia at all, sounds like a tough job!! :)
1 hr
  -> Gracias.

agree  JaneTranslates: I ran into several of these quotations from primary sources in a translation involving Caribbean colonial history. I was told to read it out loud and listen to it, and try substituting a J whenever an X doesn't sound right. Worked for me!
2 hrs
  -> Gracias.

agree  Malena Garcia
4 hrs
  -> Gracias

agree  Edmond Laporte: si. La interpretación de Marina es la correcta.
6 hrs
  -> Gracias

agree  Muriel Vasconcellos: Good thinking!
6 hrs
  -> Gracias

agree  Michele Fauble
7 hrs
  -> Gracias.

agree  Brigith Guimarães
11 hrs
  -> Gracias.

agree  Margarita Gonzalez: Correcto. El consejo de Jane Translates es muy acertado; también la F por H, como en Fazer por Hacer.
13 hrs
  -> Gracias

agree  Gabo Pena
21 hrs
  -> Gracias
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Gentlemen


Explanation:
I agree entirely with Nigelguy above, but had no space to complement his answer, so here goes, as "add":
Around 5% of the population were considered gentlemen. Their numbers increased throughout the 16th century. 'Gentlemen' are people who do not work with their hands. The middle class was larger; they were usually literate and included craftsmen and tradesmen. The vast majority of the population is poor and termed 'peasants' or 'common people'. They were mostly illiterate and suffered the most when famines occurred and the currency was debased.

In 1509, there was one duke, one marquis, ten earls, and thirty barons in England. The peerage increased to 51 by the end of Henry VIII's reign and had reached 57 when Elizabeth I became queen. But she was stingy with granting peerages and the only duke left in England (Norfolk) was executed in 1572. A new duke was not titled until 1http://englishhistory.net/tudor/tudorlife.html623.


Just one example of far too many during this period



Brigith Guimarães
Portugal
Local time: 15:24
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
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