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escopeta

English translation: blunderbuss / musket

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:escopeta
English translation:blunderbuss / musket
Entered by: tangotrans
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15:58 Aug 31, 2006
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - History / Americas/ Nicaragua
Spanish term or phrase: escopeta
This is an old text (1529) Oviedo and Valdez. He is describing about the crater of the Masaya volcano. I have no idea how to translate escopeta. I think this must be a VERY old type of escopeta.... any ideas?


Context:
"...y era tan grande y redondo que ninguna escopeta (a mi parecer) alcanzaría de una parte a la otra”(…)” y es una plaza redondísima y tan grande que podrían jugar a las cañas mas de 100 caballos...
tangotrans
Local time: 11:34
blunderbuss / musket
Explanation:
Al principio iba a decir shotgun, pero sucede que en esa época, la palabra shotgun aún no existía. Estas son mis opciones.
Acá les copio parte de un texto sobre historia de armas.

Shotguns have also been referred to as "scatterguns", "fowling pieces" or "two-shoot guns" historically, and were used as a replacement for the blunderbuss. The first recorded use of the term shotgun was in 1776 in Kentucky. It was noted as part of the "frontier language of the West" by James Fenimore Cooper. During its long history, it has been favored by bird hunters, guards and law enforcement officials.

Essentially, early muzzle-loading shotguns were identical to muskets, in that they were both smoothbore weapons that were often used to fire multiple projectiles (see "buck and ball"). However, the musket was generally a longer-barreled weapon than a true shotgun.
Selected response from:

Carlos Ruestes
Argentina
Local time: 07:34
Grading comment
thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2rifle/shot gun
Marina Herrera
5gun
Henry Hinds
4blunderbuss / musket
Carlos Ruestes
3arquebus / harqebusEnrique Espinosa


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
rifle/shot gun


Explanation:
Vear cualquier diccionario

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Note added at 29 mins (2006-08-31 16:28:40 GMT)
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Escopetas estaban en uso desde mediados del siglo XV. Shot gun tal vez sea para escopetas más modernas. But rifle es escopeta.
See this in Wikepedia,
The origins of rifling are difficult to trace, but some of the earliest practical experiments seem to have occurred in Europe during the fifteenth century. Archers had long realized that a twist added to the tail feathers of their arrows gave them greater accuracy. Early muskets produced large quantities of smoke and soot, which had to be cleaned from the action and bore of the musket frequently; either the action of repeated bore scrubbing, or a deliberate attempt to create 'soot grooves' might also have led to a perceived increase in accuracy, although no-one knows for sure. True rifling dates from the mid-15th century, although the precision required for its effective manufacture kept it out of the hands of infantrymen for another three and a half centuries.

Marina Herrera
Local time: 06:34
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 20
Notes to answerer
Asker: my question is really if you would use "shot gun" for a text that is so old, would the escopeta be called shot gun 1529?

Asker: sorry, in 1529


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Thomas Dihrberg: totalmente de acuerdo
0 min

agree  Claudia Aguero
7 mins

agree  Maria Bedoya: I would use rifle, the shot gun was not invented until around 1870
24 mins

disagree  bigedsenior: Although,rifling was invented in 1550, the term 'rifle' did not come into use until the late 1700's and was used to distinguish the the rifled bore arm from the smooth bore musket. (Ref:Wikipedia)
1 hr
  -> You're probably right, however, 15th cent. is mid 1400!
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
arquebus / harqebus


Explanation:
Entonces puede ser arcabuz, aquellas viejas armas que portaban los españoles cuando invadieron América en el siglo XVI. No es una escopeta en el sentido técnico, pero puede ser un sinónimo.

http://www.answers.com/topic/harquebus

El arcabuz evolucionó al mosquete (musket) que tampoco es una escopeta, pero eran armas comunes de los españoles de la época.

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Note added at 36 mins (2006-08-31 16:34:56 GMT)
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perdón, no es harqebus, sino harquebus

Enrique Espinosa
Local time: 05:34
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 6
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42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
gun


Explanation:
que ninguna escopeta (a mi parecer) alcanzaría de una parte a la otra = that no gun (from what I see) would be in range from one side to the other

La palabra "gun" es tan genérica que no te tienes que preocupar por el tipo de arma que pudiera ser.

Henry Hinds
Local time: 04:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 48
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43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
blunderbuss / musket


Explanation:
Al principio iba a decir shotgun, pero sucede que en esa época, la palabra shotgun aún no existía. Estas son mis opciones.
Acá les copio parte de un texto sobre historia de armas.

Shotguns have also been referred to as "scatterguns", "fowling pieces" or "two-shoot guns" historically, and were used as a replacement for the blunderbuss. The first recorded use of the term shotgun was in 1776 in Kentucky. It was noted as part of the "frontier language of the West" by James Fenimore Cooper. During its long history, it has been favored by bird hunters, guards and law enforcement officials.

Essentially, early muzzle-loading shotguns were identical to muskets, in that they were both smoothbore weapons that were often used to fire multiple projectiles (see "buck and ball"). However, the musket was generally a longer-barreled weapon than a true shotgun.


Carlos Ruestes
Argentina
Local time: 07:34
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
thanks
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