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Gran Proeza

English translation: Great Achievement

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Gran Proeza
English translation:Great Achievement
Entered by: JaneTranslates
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06:51 Feb 2, 2009
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - History / Literature; Caribbean historiography
Spanish term or phrase: Gran Proeza
Does this phrase, capitalized, have some specific significance that I'm missing?

The text is a scholarly work on Caribbean historiography. The author suggests that in the works of Spanish historians (Pedro Mártir, Oviedo, Las Casas) of the Colonial period,

"Los héroes son los Estados o sus delegados. Sus "hazañas" son: la conquista, la fundación de los centros del poder metropolitano, la creación de las instituciones de gobierno colonial..., y, finalmente, la defensa de los territorios conquistados ante las amenazas de todo tipo --ataques de los "caribes", sublevaciones indígenas, rebeliones de esclavos africanos, agresiones de las potencias enemigas--. Su ***Gran Proeza,*** en fin, fue la conquista del trópico; en consecuencia, sus gestores son presentados como agentes civilizadores."

Is this just "noble deed," "masterwork," "great achievement"? If so, why is it capitalized? Is the phrase used in literary analysis? Or am I looking for the fifth leg of the cat?
JaneTranslates
Puerto Rico
Local time: 20:16
Great Achievement
Explanation:
I think he capitalises the phrase to distance himself in a slightly ironic way from those (presumably imperialistic) historians he is talking about. Modern historians rather look down on the old what they call "Great Man" version of history, for example, and Sellar & Yeatman in 1066 And All That famously satirised the historical discourse of their day by classifiying events as either A Good Thing or A Bad Thing. I think it's capitalised rather in this spirit and would preserve the capitalisation in English translation. Great Achievement strikes me as being as good as any equivalent.

I hope that helps - and may all your cats have four legs!
Selected response from:

David Ronder
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:16
Grading comment
Thanks, David. Your explanation makes perfect sense to me. Meow!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5Great Achievement
David Ronder
4 +1Historic Exploits
Carmen Schultz
3"Great Source of Bragging Rights", "Greatest Claim to Fame"Bubo Coromandus


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
"Great Source of Bragging Rights", "Greatest Claim to Fame"


Explanation:
I think "gran proeza" has been capitalized because it's an idiom:

it was no mean feat -> fue una gran proeza
http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/mean

In Latin America "proeza" also means a "boast" (or what you might call "bragging rights")
http://diccionario.reverso.net/espanol-ingles/proeza



Bubo Coromandus
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 82
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks, Deborah. If the context were different I could really go for "no mean feat"! I'll keep it in mind for another occasion. Cheers!

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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
Great Achievement


Explanation:
I think he capitalises the phrase to distance himself in a slightly ironic way from those (presumably imperialistic) historians he is talking about. Modern historians rather look down on the old what they call "Great Man" version of history, for example, and Sellar & Yeatman in 1066 And All That famously satirised the historical discourse of their day by classifiying events as either A Good Thing or A Bad Thing. I think it's capitalised rather in this spirit and would preserve the capitalisation in English translation. Great Achievement strikes me as being as good as any equivalent.

I hope that helps - and may all your cats have four legs!

David Ronder
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 48
Grading comment
Thanks, David. Your explanation makes perfect sense to me. Meow!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Biling Services
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  LadyofArcadia: Totally agree with your comment!
5 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Marjory Hord: It might be a play on the astronauts "Great achievement for mankind" on landing on the moon
5 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  jtruzzi: this is it
1 day4 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Arusha Topazzini
2 days15 hrs
  -> Thanks
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Historic Exploits


Explanation:
Washington Times - 'Moon' celebrates Apollo exploitsSep 28, 2008 ... honored the opportunity to meet and commemorate the achievement of astronauts who participated in those historic exploits.
www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008/sep/28/moon-celebrates-ap... - 87k - Cached - Similar pages
Don't tread on me : a novel of the historic exploits, military and ...Alibris has Don't tread on me : a novel of the historic exploits, military and gallant, of Commodore John Paul Jones. With eye-witness accounts of his many ...

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Note added at 12 mins (2009-02-02 07:03:55 GMT)
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www.alibris.com/.../Don't%20tread%20on%20me%20:%20a%20nove... - 121k - Cached - Similar pages
Canoe Hill Adventures - Sea Kayak Tours and Rentals, Courses (Bay ...Depart Northern Harbor and paddle across the "Ships Run" to our base camp on historic Exploits Island. After setting up your tents again we will spend the ...
www.canoehilladventures.nl.ca/k-easy.html - 12k - Cached - Similar pages
Life and Exploits of Robert Rogers, the Ranger: A Paper Read ... - Google Books Resultby Joseph Burbeen Walker - 1885 - 15 pages
books.google.com/books?id=wEpxAAAAMAAJ...

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Note added at 13 mins (2009-02-02 07:05:34 GMT)
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Pocket Oxford Spanish Dictionary © 2005 Oxford University Press:

proeza sustantivo femenino (logro) feat, exploit;
(Mil) heroic deed o exploit


Diccionario Espasa Concise: Español-Inglés English-Spanish
© Espasa-Calpe, S.A., Madrid 2000:
proeza f exploit

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Note added at 1 day1 hr (2009-02-03 08:13:20 GMT)
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Note: If you decide to use achievement then something like "CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT" would render the idea too; you have more than one option as you do in Spanish with proeza and hazaña, which are interchangeable.


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Note added at 1 day1 hr (2009-02-03 08:17:16 GMT)
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Urban Dictionary:

1. crowning achievement
(n.) The action that is considered to be the greatest of any person, organisation or government.


Carmen Schultz
Local time: 19:16
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks, Carmen! Your "crowning achievement is a great suggestion. But what I really needed was some reassurance re the capital letters, and David gave me that. I did, in fact, ask for that in my question. I really appreciate your taking time to help me out.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Aoife Kennedy: I like "exploits", but how about "Greatest exploits"? Souns a bit more literary :)
23 mins
  -> thanks

neutral  Carol Gullidge: Agree, but doesn't explain the capital letters. It's as though this is referring to some title in particular (a book, a film...??)/// she specifically asks "If so, why is it capitalized?", which is the reason for her confusion... Hence my earlier comment
1 hr
  -> the asker has not mentioned anything as you suggest at all--perhaps you are over-analyzing. Anyhow, the ball is in her court now.
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Changes made by editors
Feb 7, 2009 - Changes made by JaneTranslates:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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